Great Middle Grade Reads discussion

Diary of a Wimpy Kid (Diary of a Wimpy Kid, #1)
This topic is about Diary of a Wimpy Kid
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ARCHIVE - BOTM discussions > Book of the Season 5 - DIARY OF A WIMPY KID

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message 1: by Jemima (new) - added it

Jemima Pett | 1059 comments Mod
The order in which we ranked the seven books was:

1= Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH 24.5%
1= Counting by 7s 24.5%
3 Fever 1793 20.4%
4= The Teacher's Funeral : A Comedy in Three Parts 8.2%
4= Diary of a Wimpy Kid 8.2%
4= The Wednesday Wars 8.2%
7 Umbrella Summer 6.1%

You can read them over July and August in any order you choose - but please put your comments in the correct thread!

This thread is for DIARY OF A WIMPY KID

I hope you enjoy it. I'm going to see how I get on with the others first - it's readily available in the UK.


message 2: by Manybooks (last edited Jul 27, 2017 04:22PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Manybooks | 152 comments Diary of a Wimpy Kid

I can see how this story might well be a hit with reluctant readers and boys, but my own personal reaction was more than a bit lacklustre.

(view spoiler)


Georgie | 35 comments Manybooks, I agree that this book felt very much like an ideal read for reluctant readers, especially boys.
I enjoyed the humour of it, particularly the moments where Greg and Rowley's ideas got them into trouble, for example their Halloween house and the giant snowball.
I also think that the author struck a good balance in creating the character of Greg between being the underdog and victim of circumstances out of his control - particularly being subject to Rodrick's pranks and big brotherly antics and to his parents' sometimes misguided decisions, such as his mother making him sign up for the school play - and between being a flawed individual who doesn't always do what's right - particularly his treatment of Rowley. I think Greg had a rather inflated idea of himself (especially when contrasting himself to Rowley) at times but put this down to youthful cockiness.
As a book for reluctant middle-grade readers, or middle-graders who are more confident readers but enjoy a lighter read, I think it would work very well. As someone who works in a library, I can certainly say I have seen many MG age readers borrow this book and others in the series, and they are frequently requested as well.
A little 'light' for me, but a fun read nonetheless.


Manybooks | 152 comments Georgie wrote: "Manybooks, I agree that this book felt very much like an ideal read for reluctant readers, especially boys.
I enjoyed the humour of it, particularly the moments where Greg and Rowley's ideas got th..."


I can see the merits of the book, but I still did not really end up enjoying it all that much on a personal level. But yeah, anything that gets reluctant readers into books and retains their interest, I applaud, even if the book itself might not be all that much to my liking.


Manybooks | 152 comments Georgie wrote: "Manybooks, I agree that this book felt very much like an ideal read for reluctant readers, especially boys.
I enjoyed the humour of it, particularly the moments where Greg and Rowley's ideas got th..."


Greg's inflated ego with regard to Rowley might also be his way of coping with his own feelings of low self esteem and dysfunctional family. I can understand that to a point, but it does not really make me like Greg all that much as I happen to feel pretty sorry for Rowley throughout.


message 6: by Jemima (new) - added it

Jemima Pett | 1059 comments Mod
Manybooks wrote: "I can see the merits of the book, but I still did not really end up enjoying it all that much on a personal level. But yeah, anything that gets reluctant readers into books...."

I've picked this up and looked at it so many times, but I just can't bring myself to read it. The film has just come (is just coming) out, and the trailer puts me off even more. But it's hugely popular with the right age group in the UK... as is Captain Underpants.
It's where I shake my head and say, sorrowfully "kids today..." just as my parents did!


message 7: by Manybooks (last edited Aug 03, 2017 12:17PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Manybooks | 152 comments Jemima wrote: "Manybooks wrote: "I can see the merits of the book, but I still did not really end up enjoying it all that much on a personal level. But yeah, anything that gets reluctant readers into books...."

..."


It was intersting but not very enjoyable, and yeah, I feel like such a curmudgeon but like you, my thoughts are similar to my parents about "kids of today" (and I am just not that into graphic novels, especially the stick figure black and white types).


message 8: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (RDouglass) | 1510 comments Mod
Some books really are best left to the kids. I never got much out of Captain Underpants, but clearly he serves a purpose. Same with a lot of the really girly books. There's a whole series about fairies of every sort and for every aspect of life in the easy reader section at our library. The very covers make me want to puke, but they get a ton of use, so who am I to judge? Not *every* MG book is worth reading as an adult. And that is probably as it should be.


SaraKat | 48 comments I agree that this book didn't teach a valuable life lesson or give kids a good role model to emulate, but the book made me laugh. I loved seeing how the words would say one thing, but the illustrations would show something different- proving Greg a liar. I think the kids reading this will appreciate the humor and enjoy it without thinking that Greg is a great example of a human being. I think they laugh at Greg more than with him. After reading Counting by 7's, I needed a 'dessert' book that let me laugh without trying too hard. :)


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