Bright Young Things discussion

30 views
Fiction (1900-1945) > September 2017 - Fiction WINNER

Comments (showing 1-32 of 32) (32 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1653 comments Mod
Nominate a work of fiction for the group to read in September 2017. It should have been written or set in the period 1900 - 1945.


message 2: by Cordelia (last edited Jul 01, 2017 06:45AM) (new)

Cordelia (Anne21) "The Berlin Stories" by Christopher Isherwood. The Berlin Stories The Last of Mr Norris/Goodbye to Berlin by Christopher Isherwood Christopher Isherwood

The first story - first published 1935. The rest - 1939.


message 3: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1525 comments Does this have more than Mr Norris Changes Trains and Goodbye to Berlin? I think we read both of those. Although I am still reading Goodbye.


message 4: by Cordelia (new)

Cordelia (Anne21) Jan C wrote: "Does this have more than Mr Norris Changes Trains and Goodbye to Berlin? I think we read both of those. Although I am still reading Goodbye."

That will be the one. Sorry. Ignore my nomination.


message 5: by Ivan (new)

Ivan | 558 comments Jacob's Room by Virginia Woolf Jacob's Room by Virginia Woolf

This is the review Bennet posted:

So who is Jacob? Everyone wants to know. Everyone has an opinion. A few things are mostly agreed upon: he is a smart and handsome young man, and no doubt up to something, and prone to boating naked, and this in proper, pre-World War I England.

The story is like following Jacob around a rambling old house in the shoes of this or that observer(a friend, associate, aunt, lover), the rooms being this or that time, place and encounter, commencing in his childhood, proceeding through college and his travels abroad, ending with his death in the war. We are left with only a scattering of personal artifacts in his empty room, about which to continue speculating.

Occasionally we glimpse Jacob's perspective but are never allowed more than glimpses, and that is the point. No matter how intrigued we may be by another, or how compelling he seems, we are chasing shadows because:

"Life is a procession of shadows, and God knows why it is that we embrace them so eagerly, and see them depart with such anguish, being shadows. And why, if this and much more than this is true, why are we yet surprised in the window corner by a sudden vision that the young man in the chair is of all things in the world the most real, the most solid . . . for we know nothing about him. Such is the manner of our seeing. Such the conditions of our love . . . But something is always impelling one to him vibrating, like the hawk moth, at the mouth of the cavern of mystery, endowing Jacob Flanders with all sorts of qualities he had not at all -- for though, certainly, he sat talking to Bonamy, half of what he said was too dull to repeat, much unintelligible, and what remains is mostly a matter of guesswork. Yet over him we hang vibrating."

In that passage you can hear the author interjecting herself. This and other narrative devices made the book experimental for its time. I'm told it's an important read for that reason, but I have yet to read anything by Virginia Woolf that is not worth reading for the language alone.


message 6: by Cordelia (new)

Cordelia (Anne21) "Sunset Song" by Lewis Grassic Gibbon. Sunset Song (A Scots Quair, #1) by Lewis Grassic Gibbon

This is a wonderful book. Voted in 2005 as "The best Scottish book of all time" by the public.

It is set in a small rural crofting area of Scotland between the years 1911 and 1919. It tells the story of the small district (and the whole of Scotland) in the years leading up to and during the Great War. Gibbon shows how the war affected the village and a whole way of life in Scotland.


message 7: by Nigeyb (last edited Jul 02, 2017 10:24AM) (new)

Nigeyb Here's another exciting nomination, this one published in 1910...




'The History of Mr. Polly' by H.G. Wells

The History of Mr. Polly is a 1910 comic novel by H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells is often cataloged as a pioneer of science fiction (which he was) . . . but he was also a great Edwardian writer of immense fame and influence who deserves to be remembered as a major literary figure (Guardian)

A delightful comedy of everyday Edwardian England that draws inspiration from its author's own life . . . The story - still strikingly modern - is a comedy about a midlife crisis . . . a comedy of ordinary, provincial life, rooted in the everyday, with countless brilliantly observed details . . . The History of Mr Polly has a special charm as a novel in which, for once, Wells became carefree and relaxed, and described the thing he could never find for himself - peace of mind (Robert McCrum Guardian)

'The History of Mr Polly (1910) is a disturbing comic masterpiece . . . a more gently satirical and masculine counterpart to Flaubert's Madame Bovary . . . a classic of radical existentialism, and, after 100 years, still amusing, unsettling and powerfully contemporary ' (Washington Post)

It's also number 39 in the Guardian's 100 best novels

Here's what they say...

https://www.theguardian.com/books/201...


message 8: by Jennifer W (new)

Jennifer W | 1001 comments Mod
Nightwood by Djuna Barnes

Nightwood, Djuna Barnes' strange and sinuous tour de force, "belongs to that small class of books that somehow reflect a time or an epoch" (TLS). That time is the period between the two World Wars, and Barnes' novel unfolds in the decadent shadows of Europe's great cities, Paris, Berlin, and Vienna—a world in which the boundaries of class, religion, and sexuality are bold but surprisingly porous. The outsized characters who inhabit this world are some of the most memorable in all of fiction.


message 9: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia How about Save Me the Waltz by Zelda Fitzgerald? It offers an interesting slant on Fitzgerald's own better known novels, especially Tender Is The Night.


message 10: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1525 comments Roman Clodia wrote: "How about Save Me the Waltz by Zelda Fitzgerald? It offers an interesting slant on Fitzgerald's own better known novels, especially Tender Is The Night."

Did you check our archived discussions to see if we read this one? I've a vague feeling that we may have. I remember trying it but I had real difficulty reading it.

I know that in some cases we have re-read books..


message 11: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia Ah, sorry, I didn't check before posting - apologies, you read it in 2013 so ignore me!


message 12: by Nigeyb (last edited Jul 03, 2017 11:31AM) (new)

Nigeyb Hi Roman Clodia, You can always join in on the old discussions. Frequently a new comment will reignite an old discussion....

Click here to get involved in the BYT discussion about Save Me the Waltz by Zelda Fitzgerald.

To be honest Roman Clodia, you've probably dodged a bullet. Click here to read my review. A few readers seem to like it, so perhaps you might be in that number, but I, and many others, found it to be hard going and tedious.


message 13: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia Thanks, Nigeyb! I have read Waltz some time ago but rushed through it and having recently re-read Tender, thought it would be fun to go back to it more slowly with a group. I definitely liked it more than you did but agree it can be a difficult, even chaotic read.

Now that I've found the archives, I'll be interested to see what you all thought of it.


message 14: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb Likewise Roman Clodia, I'd love to read a few of your thoughts about Waltz


message 15: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1653 comments Mod
Yes - Nigeyb is right - our archive remains open so do check it out and add your comments to any discussion that takes your fancy: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/group...

I think, since we've been up and running since 2009, it is inevitable that our membership will change over time so if there is enough interest in re-reading a book then I'm up for that too...the polls are a good place to test that out so do shout up if you want to add anything.


message 16: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1653 comments Mod
How about...

The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley

When one long, hot summer, young Leo is staying with a school-friend at Brandham Hall, he begins to act as a messenger between Ted, the farmer, and Marian, the beautiful young woman up at the hall. He becomes drawn deeper and deeper into their dangerous game of deceit and desire, until his role brings him to a shocking and premature revelation. The haunting story of a young boy's awakening into the secrets of the adult world, The Go-Between is also an unforgettable evocation of the boundaries of Edwardian society.


message 17: by Nigeyb (last edited Jul 03, 2017 02:01PM) (new)

Nigeyb Ally wrote: "How about...

The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley"


I read The Go-Between last year and abso-blimmin-lutely loved it. It's brilliant.

Click here to read my review

5/5


message 18: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1653 comments Mod
I remembered your review Nigeyb and it helped towards my choice...I'm hoping that it will be a great reading choice for the 'dying days of summer'.


message 19: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 394 comments I loved loved loved the Go Between!


message 20: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb Great to see so much love for 'The Go-Between' and I agree that it is a perfect summer read, in much the same way as the superb 'A Month in the Country' (still my favourite BYT read ever ever ever - thanks again Ivan, you legend)


message 21: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia Just to add to the love for The Go-Between - and I'd certainly re-read it with the group.

A Month in the Country has been on my TBR for ages, so shame I missed it - glad to have found you guys!


message 22: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb Roman Clodia wrote: "A Month in the Country has been on my TBR for ages, so shame I missed it!"

I hope you read it and report back - reignite the discussion thread if and when you do get round to it. Nothing would make me happier than to read your thoughts.

Roman Clodia wrote: "....glad to have found you guys!"

We're glad you found us too Roman Clodia.

Welcome aboard the Good Ship BYT.


message 23: by Jennifer W (new)

Jennifer W | 1001 comments Mod
Nigeyb wrote: "Hi Roman Clodia, You can always join in on the old discussions. Frequently a new comment will reignite an old discussion...."

Likewise, Cordelia, feel free to revive the Berlin Stories!

Mr Norris:
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

Goodbye to Berlin: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 24: by Susan (last edited Jul 04, 2017 11:35PM) (new)

Susan | 774 comments Delighted to see The Go-Between is now available on kindle. I have never read it, so would love to do so.

By the way, delighted you joined the group Roman Clodia. I know we share a lot of overlap in books we enjoy and I look forward to your choices.


message 25: by Roman Clodia (new)

Roman Clodia Thanks, Susan - good to see you here! I think you'll enjoy The Go-Between if it gets chosen.


message 26: by Susan (new)

Susan | 774 comments Yes, I am sure I will. I have so many books to review, plus groups that I belong to, that I need to be tempted by the winner, but there are usually good nominations to choose from.


message 27: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1653 comments Mod
Any more nominations before I create the polls?


message 28: by Ally (new)


message 29: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1653 comments Mod
We have our winner...

The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley


message 30: by Susan (new)

Susan | 774 comments Looking forward to discussing The Go-Between. A book I had meant to read for a long time, but only got around to now.


message 31: by Ivan (new)

Ivan | 558 comments I have a lovely copy and will start reading when I finish The Edwardians.

My copy: The Go-Between by L.P. HartleyThe Go-Between


message 32: by Nigeyb (new)

Nigeyb Ally wrote: "We have our winner...

The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley"


I'll get the thread started


back to top