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message 1: by B.W. (new)

B.W. Morris (sixpackwriter) | 27 comments When I sit down to write, I often try to think of ways to end the chapter that will encourage people to keep reading. However, I've found that it doesn't always mean you have to some climatic event that happens at the end of the chapter.

Sometimes I do this, but I've found it can be just as useful to have a character ponder a question or an event and get the reader to wonder what it all means and how it's going to affect the character through the rest of the book.

What about you? What have you found to be effective ways of ending chapters and getting readers to keep turning the pages?


message 2: by Brigid (new)

Brigid Amos | 4 comments B.W. wrote: "When I sit down to write, I often try to think of ways to end the chapter that will encourage people to keep reading. However, I've found that it doesn't always mean you have to some climatic event..."
Good question! I realize that I think about these things more when I write plays than when I write fiction (i.e., how to get the audience to come back after intermission, LOL!) I do need to think more about this in fiction.


message 3: by Bethany (new)

Bethany Swafford (bethany_swafford) | 13 comments Actually, because I am a visual person, I always think of the end of chapters as commercial breaks for a tv show. Sometimes it is a dramatic pause, other times it's simply the end of the scene.


message 4: by Brett (new)

Brett Armstrong | 13 comments B.W. wrote: "When I sit down to write, I often try to think of ways to end the chapter that will encourage people to keep reading. However, I've found that it doesn't always mean you have to some climatic event..."

With my recent novel Day Moon I made a very conscious effort to end each chapter with some kind of question unanswered. Sometimes they were bigger scope questions that wouldn't be resolved quickly and others were more immediate issues. I feel like that was one of the strengths of The Hunger Games series. Whole chapters could be filled with introspection and the deeper content of the story, but by the end there was something that exclaimed, "Don't stop reading!"


message 5: by Greg (new)

Greg Turnquist | 2 comments This was a keen point in Writing the Breakout Novel by Donald Maass. He talks about the importance of raising the stakes. End every chapter with tension, if not every page. I've tweaked the ending of several chapters, some by swapping a couple sentences, to hopefully whet the reader's appetite and keep reading. It's what I'd want too!


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