Sir Walter Scott Appreciation discussion

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10 books in 1 year challenge > Rosemarie's Silver Ten

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message 1: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
My goal this year is to read books from my own collection whenever possible.


message 2: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "My goal this year is to read books from my own collection whenever possible."

When you have chosen one for the first decade I will post it on the bookshelf and anyone who wants to buddy read our choices can contact us.


message 3: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
I think I will read Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare for July. I have a copy on my shelf already.


message 4: by Rosemarie (last edited Nov 20, 2017 08:31PM) (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
Silver challenge:

The country refers to the country of birth of the author.

1800-1809: Tales from Shakespeare by Charles Lamb (England)
1810 - 1819: Ivanhoe by Walter Scott (Scotland)
1820 -1829: The Misfortunes of Elphin by Thomas Love Peacock(U.K.)
1830 - 1839: Einen Jux will er sich machen by Johann Nestroy (Austria)
1840 -1849: Poor Folk (Arme Leute) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky ( Russia)
1850 - 1859: La Tulipe Noire by Alexandre Dumas (France)
1860 -1869: Peer Gynt by Henrik Ibsen (Norway)
1870 - 1879: Rose in Bloom by Louisa May Alcott (U.S.A.)
1880 - 1889: Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ by Lew Wallace (U.S.A.)
1890 -1899: The Turn of the Screw by Henry James (U.S.)


message 5: by Rosemarie (last edited Jul 17, 2017 09:02PM) (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
I am reading Peer Gynt for the 1860's. Reading the play gives me more insight into the character of Peer, since I had already seen the play.


message 6: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
La Tulipe Noire is the first book by Dumas that I have read in its entirety. It was a very enjoyable read for me because it wasn't about French aristocrats, but had a Dutch horticulturist for a hero instead.


message 7: by Rosemarie (last edited Aug 19, 2017 07:00PM) (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
Ivanhoe was not as enjoyable as the other books I have read by Scott. I know he was describing the conditions of the time but I have real issues with his portrayal of Isaac.


message 8: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
Fyodor Dostoyevsky is one of my favourite authors. For the 1840s I read Arme Leute, which was not a disappointment.
It is one of his earliest works, but he already shows his insight into human nature and his humanity in the depiction of the lives of poor folk.


message 9: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "Fyodor Dostoyevsky is one of my favourite authors. For the 1840s I read Arme Leute, which was not a disappointment.
It is one of his earliest works, but he already sh..."


You are steaming ahead. Great work.


message 10: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
I have not made any plans this year, just finding great books as I go along.


message 11: by Rosemarie (last edited Oct 02, 2017 07:00PM) (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
I have finished reading the second of Walter Scott's novles for this year, Count Robert of Paris.

I didn't enjoy it as much as the other books I have read so far, but it was still a lot of fun.


message 12: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

On the whole, I really didn't like this book. I have never been a fan of this type of story. I can appreciate how well written the tale is, but it is not a book I will re-read.


message 13: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

On the whole, I really didn't like this book. I have never been a fan of this type of story. I can appreciate how well written the ta..."


No I wouldn't keep it on my bookshelf but what I found interesting was that I think James was hinting at that it was the governess all along that was hysterical. Tying it in with The Yellow Wallpaper; The Wallpaper Replies at the same time I think enhanced both for me. It's not my genre either but I am exploring how psychological disturbances are/were viewed and treated and pondering if anything much has changed. Being in the health care profession I would have to say that in some instances, no not really. For my own self, I have had fibromyalgia for more than 30 years and was ontinually treated as being 'a head case' and needing antidepressant treatment. Now finally I am diagnosed and being treated with holistic treatments and some pain meds (not an antidepressant in sight and voila...I am slowly getting better. So you can see how this perspective I can now bring to all such 'stories' of emotional behaviour in females.


message 14: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
My younger daughter's father-in-law has fibromyalgia, and they probably took him seriously. I am glad you are finally getting some treatment that works for you.
You may know this already, but the hyster in hysteria refers to the Greek word for uterus. That sums up the paternal attitude right there.

Back to the story, I had an opportunity to read it in one day, so I did. I really just wanted to finish the story.

What did you think of the children?


message 15: by Deborah (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) Rosemarie wrote: "I am reading Peer Gynt for the 1860's. Reading the play gives me more insight into the character of Peer, since I had already seen the play."

I truly enjoy Ibsen's plays. Enjoy his strong women characters


message 16: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "My younger daughter's father-in-law has fibromyalgia, and they probably took him seriously. I am glad you are finally getting some treatment that works for you.
You may know this already, but the h..."


I thought the children were innocent of everything and that they reacted to what the governess was suggesting rather than be the cause of it.


message 17: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
The Misfortunes of Elphin by Thomas Love Peacock was a delightful trip back to the time of King Arthur and the Welsh Bard Taliesin.
This book was light and entertaining, with comedic interjections by the author. It was an enjoyable break from some of the heavier books that I am reading.


message 18: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "The Misfortunes of Elphin by Thomas Love Peacock was a delightful trip back to the time of King Arthur and the Welsh Bard Taliesin.
This book was light and entertaining..."


I have never heard of this one. Looks interesting.


message 19: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
I bought it as an ibook(ebook) at a reasonable price. The book is extremely hard to find as an actual book. I really enjoyed it.


message 20: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "I bought it as an ibook(ebook) at a reasonable price. The book is extremely hard to find as an actual book. I really enjoyed it."

Seems to be the case. What will the world do if there few real books and limited or no power/electricity? If I read a book that I feel has real merit I am trying to track down a hard copy. This might sound strange but I am a great believer that we don't know what we have until we lose it and the power of the written word is too important to leave in the hands of a few. Just a bit of the world according to Tracey there :)


message 21: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
I have just finished reading Fahrenheit 451, so I know exactly how you feel.


message 22: by Rosemarie (last edited Oct 24, 2017 02:10PM) (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
Rose in Bloomis the sequel to Eight Cousins. It begins well as Rose is now a young lady and has to decide what to do with her life. She decides to help her community, since she is wealthy. The book begins well but towards the end becomes quite predictable and doesn't live up to the interesting beginning.


message 23: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
Einen Jux will er sich machen is a very entertaining comedy written by the prolific playwright, Johann Nestroy, who was also the actor/manager for his stage productions. It is funny, but I don't know if it translates well into English.


message 24: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ was an enjoyable book to read and had much more depth and breadth than the movie version.


message 25: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
What was your favourite book out of the list?


message 26: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 270 comments Mod
That is a difficult question. I enjoyed the books by Wallace, Nestroy and Peacock the most. I enjoyed Black Tulip more than I thought I would, since I abandoned La Reine Margot.
I don't know whether I like the James book or not, but it was well written.
The biggest disappointment was Rose in Bloom.


message 27: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 319 comments Mod
The Black Tulip was my first Dumas and I also enjoyed it but didn't enjoy The Three Musketeers


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