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The Hum and the Shiver (Tufa, #1)
This topic is about The Hum and the Shiver
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The Hum and the Shiver > THATS: Love the tribute, book was meh

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message 1: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3861 comments I'm glad that our leaders chose a book to honor Joanna as she was a well loved member of our group. My own interactions with her were always positive. She loved puns as do I, and I recall a number of her posts with whopper ones.

As for the book chosen, it certainly looks like a good choice on the face of it. Well reviewed, start of a series. The book left me fairly cold, though. It was fairly dull and nondescript through the first half, and only got into anything unlike modern mundanity towards the end. Even that was too little too late.

Some specifics, spoiler protected:
(view spoiler)

The ending was a bit abrupt and made me wonder if this was the start of a continuing story. I liked the last half of the book enough to consider reading more. A look through online sites, though, shows that there's more stories of the Tufa, but they are not particularly related. Bronwyn's story doesn't continue in the next book, although there seem to be some self pubbed shorts that tie up major plot points. Perhaps I'll pick up more during a slow period, but I'm not motivated to run out and read more.


AndrewP (andrewca) | 2447 comments I agree with John. A great idea for the tribute but a pretty meh book. It started out good but meandered along for over 200 pages then rushed to the end.

Another specific spoiler point that really annoyed me:
(view spoiler)


message 3: by Emma (last edited Jun 13, 2017 10:51AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Emma (coffee_addict) | 64 comments John (Taloni) wrote: "(view spoiler)"

I enjoyed the book, but this is probably one of my biggest issues with it. After being (view spoiler), there is absolutely no way there wouldn't be mental ramifications of some sort. I can understand (view spoiler) when she didn't fully remember what happened in Iraq, but after she remembers she continues on as if nothing changed.

(view spoiler)

The way that entire event was handled frustrated me. The fact that event was pointed out when she was having memory issues seemed superfluous, and the story would have been fine without it.

Edit: Actually, after thinking about it a little more, it really bothers me. So I'm changing my rating from "Really enjoyed it" to "it was ok".

AndrewP wrote: "I agree with John. A great idea for the tribute but a pretty meh book. It started out good but meandered along for over 200 pages then rushed to the end."

I completely agree with this. The book drug for me in the beginning and sped up at the end. For the amount of time it took to set the story up, everything resolved really quickly.


Brendan (mistershine) | 930 comments Danielle wrote: "After being (view spoiler), there is absolutely no way there wouldn't be mental ramifications of some sort."

I found this part of the book jarring, bizarre and poorly done. Felt out of place in this story that was otherwise about hillbilly fairies.


Trike | 8156 comments I never got the impression that she remembered what happened to her, just that she had read the report. Hence her disconnect from the experience.


Emma (coffee_addict) | 64 comments Trike wrote: "I never got the impression that she remembered what happened to her, just that she had read the report. Hence her disconnect from the experience."

You're right, I went back and looked. She did just read it in the report. Though that, to me, makes it worse. (view spoiler)

Granted, I'm extremely biased when it comes to this topic for very personal reasons.


message 7: by Trike (last edited Jun 13, 2017 12:32PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Trike | 8156 comments Danielle wrote: "Trike wrote: "I never got the impression that she remembered what happened to her, just that she had read the report. Hence her disconnect from the experience."

You're right, I went back and looked. She did just read it in the report. Though that, to me, makes it worse. (view spoiler)

Granted, I'm extremely biased when it comes to this topic for very personal reasons. "


I get that. I have similar trigger issues on this subject, hence my massive freak-out when the David Wong book was chosen as a club read.

Here though it felt to me like there was more uncertainty about what she experienced and the Army propaganda around the situation, which is why I didn't have the same visceral reaction.

I don't want to diminish your absolutely valid reaction to such topics. As you can see, I'm publicly outspoken on these things so I feel the same way.

ETA: the thread in question, which I've still never read in its entirety because of how I feel about the subject. https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


Sandra (whatlovelybooks) | 179 comments I wasn't cool with all the slut shaming in this book.
I agree though the book was very meh.


message 9: by Jessica (last edited Jun 23, 2017 06:12PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jessica (j-boo) | 321 comments I enjoyed a lot about this book - the characters, the setting, the mysterious/mystical ambiance. But we get introduced to a bunch of these interesting things right from the get go, then nothing much really happens with them for quite some time. There's a lot of Bronwyn saying, "I know I need to do that, but not right now, I'll do it later." Much of the book seems to be her putting things off. But things pick up by the end and overall it was alright, and a 3 star read for me.


Jenny (Reading Envy) (readingenvy) | 2833 comments I wonder... if the Tufa are able to heal physically so much more quickly than humans, is it possible that emotional wounds and trauma might go through the same process? I agree it isn't addressed explicitly but these songs... these people... they seem to have the possibility of this power.


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