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Fatelessness
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1001 book reviews > Fatelessness by Imre Kertész

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message 1: by Diane (last edited Jun 03, 2017 10:17AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Diane | 2022 comments Rating: 4+ stars
Read: June 2017

Fatelessness is a semi-autobiographical novel about the experiences of a teenage boy during the Holocaust. He is sent away to a series of concentration camps, but does not really understand why or fully comprehend what is happening. He spends the book coming to terms with his fate. He seems to view his experiences with a sense of detachment, as though he is viewing them from the outside. He feels alienated from his fellow inmates since he doesn't really identify with the culture, religious practices, and language of the others. Some of the fellow prisoners don't consider him to be Jewish enough (or at all). This book seemed different from most Holocaust accounts in that it focused on a lot of the day to day events rather on the larger atrocities.

Not an easy subject to read about, but definitely a book that everyone should read.


Diane Zwang | 1218 comments Mod
Diane wrote: "Rating: 4+ stars
Read: June 2017

Fatelessness is a semi-autobiographical novel about the experiences of a teenage boy during the Holocaust. He is sent away to a series of concentration camps, but ..."


This was a good book. We read it as a group a few years back and I think everyone was impressed. There is also a movie if you are interested.


Diane | 2022 comments Diane wrote: "Diane wrote: "Rating: 4+ stars
Read: June 2017

Fatelessness is a semi-autobiographical novel about the experiences of a teenage boy during the Holocaust. He is sent away to a series of concentrati..."


Oh, wow, I didn't realize there was a movie. I would love to see it.


message 4: by George P. (last edited Aug 27, 2020 11:44AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

George P. | 431 comments In this novel a teenage boy who is “not really Jewish” is sent to concentration camps one year before liberation, and barely survives.
Told in a first-person, rambling, almost stream-of-consciousness style very different from the more usual journalistic style.
It was an effort to follow his thoughts at times, and it's not the best novel about the holocaust (that may be The Pianist, or Schindler's List if you consider that to be a novel) but certainly worth reading.
Three and a half stars.

I saw the film (titled "Fateless") about 10 years ago and rated it four stars. I don't remember it very well now, though. I see it has a 94% positive rating from critics on RottenTomatoes.


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