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what is the most dangerous city in fiction?

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message 1: by Christos (last edited Jun 03, 2017 12:04PM) (new)

Christos | 165 comments I read an article that said the town in the show Murder She wrote would be the murder capital of the world if it were real. Then I remembered that in the trailer for the upcoming movie Stephen Kings IT a character said the murder rate is 6x the average for adults and even worse for kids and that's just Pennywise the clowns victims not to mention all the other countless monsters in the King Universe with a high body count who all live in Maine. So what do you think is the the most dangerous city or town in all of fiction? And why the heck would anyone stay there? Batman's Gotham City has to be high up there


message 2: by Silvana (new)

Silvana (silvaubrey) | 1627 comments King's Landing


message 3: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8467 comments Small towns in murder mysteries are especially dangerous. I definitely think Cabot Cove, Maine, of Murder, She Wrote is the most dangerous cozy getaway. I recall the town lost 26% (!!!) of its population while Jessica Fletcher lived there. That's a death rate of 26,000 per 100,000 people. The only historical comparisons are the death rates during the Black Death and the bombing of Hiroshima.

For my money, though, the winner has to be Sunnydale. It's the only small town where you can be brutally murdered twice. (Bonus: mass murders take place an average of every 18 months. Take that, Cabot Cove. You too, Castle Rock. And you, Storybrooke. Also you, Chester's Mill. And you, Salem's Lot. Holy shit, we should stay the hell out of Maine! )


message 4: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments You guys are talking about cities full of dangerous people. If you want cities that are dangerous, you need to read Brian Hodge. In his stories, cities turn into Lovecraftian monsters that consume the souls of people who live there.


message 5: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8467 comments Sean wrote: "You guys are talking about cities full of dangerous people. If you want cities that are dangerous, you need to read Brian Hodge. In his stories, cities turn into Lovecraftian monste..."

Dark Astoria in Paragon City is literally populated by only ghosts, zombies and monsters, including a giant zombie kaiju.


message 6: by Christos (new)

Christos | 165 comments I forgot about Video Games, what about Resident Evil and Silent Hill where there were barely any survivors.


message 7: by Maclurker (new)

Maclurker | 122 comments Lankhmar in Nehwon. Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser had many a narrow escape here from wizards, gods, and the Thieves Guild.


message 8: by Shad (new)

Shad (splante) | 345 comments Haven, Maine was a pretty dangerous small town to live in.


message 9: by William (new)

William | 405 comments The city of Leng is not one that I would like to visit as I am quite convinced that I have an allergy to shoggoths and albino penguins.

There's also the little town of Midsomer. A quick search turns up 246 murders; twelve accidental deaths, eleven suicides and eight deaths from natural causes. In one year alone there were 12 locals strangled, 13 poisoned, 16 drowned – including one in a vat of soup! – four killed by bow and arrow attack, and six decapitated.

No shoggoths though, so that's good.


message 10: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (new)

Tassie Dave | 3532 comments Mod
South Park, Colorado (Even the kids are dangerous)
Racoon City from Resident Evil.

Mount Thomas (A TV fictional small town in rural Australia) is sometimes jokingly referred to as the 'Crime Capital of Australia' due to the constant stream of murders, thefts, kidnappings, explosions, shootings and assaults which happened on Blue Heelers on a weekly basis.


message 12: by Phil (new)

Phil | 1140 comments Waterdeep, Neverwinter, and Baldur's Gate and Menzoberranzan in the Forgotten Realms aren't particularly safe. The latter especially if you're not a dark-elf.


message 13: by Gary (new)

Gary R'lyeh


message 14: by Joseph (new)

Joseph | 2267 comments The village of Sandford, Gloucestershire, as depicted in the documentary film Hot Fuzz, seems pretty unsafe if you're not one of the proper folks.


message 15: by Trike (last edited Jun 04, 2017 10:01AM) (new)

Trike | 8467 comments Joseph wrote: "The village of Sandford, Gloucestershire, as depicted in the documentary film Hot Fuzz, seems pretty unsafe if you're not one of the proper folks."

I suspect the same is true of the wives of Stepford, Connecticut.

Which reminds me of Cornwall Coombe, Connecticut, the setting for Harvest Home. That town has the opposite gender dynamic of The Stepford Wives but the same darkness fueling it. Although in Cornwall Coombe, as long as you don't rock the boat you're mostly okay. (Except for a certain special subsection of the population. You know who I mean if you've read the book or seen the miniseries The Dark Secret of Harvest Home.)

What was it about Connecticut in 1972 that inspired these novels? (See also: The Other.) The state's small towns wouldn't be rehabilitated until the Gilmore Girls came along.


message 16: by Gary (last edited Jun 04, 2017 10:20AM) (new)

Gary Schierman (GSchierman) | 1 comments I was a big fan of the Thieves' World shared-world anthology series (edited by Robert Asprin) back in the 1980's, set in a city misleadingly named "Sanctuary". It wasn't very safe.


message 17: by Misti (new)

Misti (spookster5) | 475 comments After spending most of last week playing Batman Arkham Knight, Gotham City gets my vote.


message 18: by Allison (last edited Jun 05, 2017 10:41AM) (new)

Allison Hurd | 226 comments Trike wrote: "What was it about Connecticut in 1972 that inspired these novels? "

Have you been to CT? I'm a native of that state. It's fuckin' haunted, man. And very clannish. You drive through twisted woods and dynamite blasted mountains that weep constantly. Following roads that never go the direction you think they ought (ex. to go north, you take the local road south, that actually corkscrews north for a bit, to the part of the major highway that goes more or less east-west, and then about 60 miles away from the straight line you feel you should be taking to your destination, you finally turn north) and will just show up at a town that feels like time hasn't touched it.

Then you add the northern coldness and distrust of strangers (we didn't know the name of the people who'd lived behind us for a decade, for example. When I moved south, it took me several months to understand that the people I passed on the street weren't looking to start a fight when they said "hello" to me) you get a strange mixture of grace and pastoral beauty with a hint of something wrong, but you're not sure if it's just "rich people" weird, or if something is about to go down.

Sprinkle in a huge amount of drug trafficking and attendant organized crime operations thanks to I-95 running right through the state and the proximity to NY and Boston, plus a puritan history that's evident everywhere you turn, it's sort of a perfect mixture for "something will go wrong at any moment" vibes.

And it's all worth it for the pizza and apple fritters.

That said, I think Roanoke gets my vote for city that is itself dangerous, and NY has had how many seasons of detective shows covering murders? I think it might win. Sunnydale's a close second.


message 19: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8467 comments Interesting. I have been to CT but never got that sense. (But then I have what people call "resting danger face" and I give off a perp vibe, so I probably fit right in.)


message 20: by Joseph (new)

Joseph | 2267 comments Allison wrote: "Trike wrote: "What was it about Connecticut in 1972 that inspired these novels? "

Have you been to CT? I'm a native of that state. It's fuckin' haunted, man. And very clannish. You drive through t..."


That sounds positively Lovecraftian!

Another nominee: Snake Plissken's New York.


message 21: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3948 comments I'm thinking Ankh-Morpork might chart, even though the deaths are more implied in the shadows than stated.


message 22: by Aaron (last edited Jun 05, 2017 12:08PM) (new)

Aaron Nagy | 379 comments London, assuming you add up all the deaths from the various fictional worlds together.


message 23: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8467 comments Aaron wrote: "London, assuming you add up all the deaths from the various fictional worlds together."

Are we doing that? Because that would change the dynamic somewhat. I suspect NYC has been destroyed more often than any other city. Marvel has blown it up a dozen times this century alone.

Also, do we count versions of real cities? Inquiring minds want to know!


message 24: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Porter | 3 comments I always thought Cil-Aujas from R Scott Bakker's world of the second apocalypse was very dangerous... a place where the boundary between the living world was almost completely frayed due to the various atrocities committed there... more here:
http://princeofnothing.wikia.com/wiki...

endless byzantine tunnels, miles of darkness, constant threat by rampaging hordes of monsters...



""
There were galleries immediately below them, stretching many miles into the entombed fundament. Before, he had known this as an abstraction, as something drawn from the uncertain palette of memory. But now he could feel those wending spaces, not directly, but through the constellation of absences, the pits in the stitch of existence, that moved through them.

Chorae...

Tears of God, at least a dozen of them, borne by something that prowled the halls beneath their feet.

The riot of thought and passion that so often heralded disaster. The apprehension of meaning to be had where no sense could be found, not because he was too simple, but because he was too small and the conspiracies were too great.

Sarl was little more than a direction in the viscous black. "Run!" the Wizard cried. "Run!"
""


This was after quick search...sure a lot more can be brought up...but I need to finish up here at work before I can dive in deeper with descriptions


message 25: by Lariela (new)

Lariela | 79 comments Gotham City sounds really dangerous.


message 26: by William (last edited Jun 07, 2017 01:47PM) (new)

William | 405 comments John (Taloni) wrote: "I'm thinking Ankh-Morpork might chart, even though the deaths are more implied in the shadows than stated."

Ankh-Morpork actually has a very low murder rate:

"Murder was in fact a fairly uncommon event in Ankh-Morpork, but there were a lot of suicides. Walking in the night-time alleyways of The Shades was suicide. Asking for a short in a dwarf bar was suicide. Saying ‘Got rocks in your head?’ to a troll was suicide. You could commit suicide very easily, if you weren’t careful."
(From Men at Arms)

;-)


message 27: by Joe Informatico (new)

Joe Informatico (joeinformatico) | 888 comments Well, the cities in Philip Reeve's Hungry City Chronicles are mounted on gigantic caterpillar treads, and they literally hunt down and eat other cities.


message 28: by Allison (last edited Jun 07, 2017 12:51PM) (new)

Allison Hurd | 226 comments William wrote: "John (Taloni) wrote: "I'm thinking Ankh-Morpork might chart, even though the deaths are more implied in the shadows than stated."

Ankh-Morpork actually has a very low murder rate:

"Murder was in ..."


I feel like a city that drives you to suicide is just as dangerous as one full of rampaging murderers, no? In fact, it might be even scarier. You could ostensibly hide in Gotham or Sunnydale from the threats. I'm not sure how you hide from how own agency.


message 29: by J (new)

J Austill | 72 comments William wrote: "John (Taloni) wrote: "I'm thinking Ankh-Morpork might chart, even though the deaths are more implied in the shadows than stated."

Ankh-Morpork actually has a very low murder rate:

"Murder was in ..."


How did you miss the joke!!!


message 30: by Sifou (new)

Sifou | 8 comments Hard to beat the Nightside by Simon R Green.


message 31: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8467 comments Allison wrote: "I feel like a city that drives you to suicide is just as dangerous as one full of rampaging murderers, no? In fact, it might be even scarier. You could ostensibly hide in Gotham or Sunnydale from the threats. I'm not sure how you hide from how own agency. "

LOL We're not laughing *at* you, we're laughing *near* you. :D


message 32: by Allison (new)

Allison Hurd | 226 comments Oh dear. It seems I had a literal day today. ^^ I'll try a hard reboot on my sense of humor tonight.


message 33: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8467 comments We still adore you, young miss, never fear.


message 34: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 4142 comments Not specifically for murder, but I'd be afraid to live in any city where a medical drama has been set. Seattle (Grey's Anatomy) has had multiple mass shooting events, gas explosions, etc, and has been fairly tame compared to Chicago (Chicago Hope and e.r.).


message 35: by Lariela (new)

Lariela | 79 comments I live in Albuquerque, where Breaking Bad is set.


message 36: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8467 comments Do islands count? I've never seen this show, Death In Paradise, but it sounds delightfully dangerous.

http://www.radiotimes.com/news/2013-0...


message 37: by Matthew (new)

Matthew (masupert) | 215 comments I don't think I want to be in Lether from the Malazan books. You had gods and dragons dying there. Hounds of shadow tore the regular citizens apart and the canal that runs through the city is filled with dead bodies.


message 38: by Lena (new)

Lena My mother still loves watching Murder She Wrote. I gave her a hell of laugh when I told her the murder rate at Cabots Cove. Thanks guys!


message 39: by David (new)

David (davidh219) Oh man, that's a good question. New Crobuzon seems like a pretty unsafe place to be.


message 40: by William (new)

William | 405 comments David wrote: "Oh man, that's a good question. New Crobuzon seems like a pretty unsafe place to be."

Sometimes I wish I could step through a portal to another world..just think of the wonders you could see....but if I turned up in New Crobuzon I would jump back through that portal to good old Planet Earth at inhuman speeds.

It makes me shudder just to think about it!


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