The Next Best Book Club discussion

121 views
Group Read Discussions > The Whole Town's Talking

Comments Showing 1-23 of 23 (23 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10022 comments Mod
Hi everyone. Time to get your beachy read on!

This discussion will also be held byBook Concierge. Why not post a few initial thoughts while we wait for her kick things off?


message 2: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) The Whole Town's Talking by Fannie Flagg / Fannie Flagg

Elmwood Springs, Missouri, is a small town like any other, but something strange is happening at the cemetery. Still Meadows, as it’s called, is anything but still. Original, profound, The Whole Town’s Talking, a novel in the tradition of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town and Flagg’s own Can’t Wait to Get to Heaven, tells the story of Lordor Nordstrom, his Swedish mail-order bride, Katrina, and their neighbors and descendants as they live, love, die, and carry on in mysterious and surprising ways.

Lordor Nordstrom created, in his wisdom, not only a lively town and a prosperous legacy for himself but also a beautiful final resting place for his family, friends, and neighbors yet to come. “Resting place” turns out to be a bit of a misnomer, however. Odd things begin to happen, and it starts the whole town talking.

With her wild imagination, great storytelling, and deep understanding of folly and the human heart, the beloved Fannie Flagg tells an unforgettable story of life, afterlife, and the remarkable goings-on of ordinary people. In The Whole Town’s Talking, she reminds us that community is vital, life is a gift, and love never dies.


message 3: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) Is this the first book by Flagg that you've read? If not, what others have you enjoyed?


message 4: by Kayleen (new)

Kayleen (jegka) | 14 comments I also read Welcome to the World, Baby Girl! I liked this one much better.

I was convinced Where the Heart Is was also written by Fannie Flagg, but I see I was mistaken. Letts' has the same small town wholesomeness. They have the same feel to me.


message 5: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Proctor  | 22 comments This is the first book by Fannie that I have read. It is not what I bought. I don't usually read book jackets. I like to just pick up a book and see what is in store. I thought the concept of the book was interesting. I fell in love with Lordor and Katrina from the beginning. I am not sure how to classify this book-- i felt like it was an overview. I was about 50 pages in and realized that I was waiting for the story to start-- but it already had. Pleasantly surprised by the ending. This is my first monthly book discussion so I am eager to see other people's thoughts on this!!


message 6: by Joanie (new)

Joanie | 714 comments I just read this last month and I ended up liking it much more than I expected. I read Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe and Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man back in college and loved them both and then read Redbird Christmas a few years back but some of her other books just haven't held my attention. My in-person book club picked this last month and I was pleasantly surprised how much I liked it. Looking forward to seeing what others have to say!


message 7: by Book Concierge (last edited Jun 04, 2017 09:20AM) (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) Book Concierge wrote: "Is this the first book by Flagg that you've read? If not, what others have you enjoyed?"

I've read almost everything she's written ... though some pre-dated my participation on Goodreads, so they're not recorded as having been read.

I think my favorite remains Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe


message 8: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) What do you think the title refers to?


message 9: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Proctor  | 22 comments Initially I thought the title referred to a gossipy town that rears its ugly head. Once I started, I realized that was not the case at all. It was more about Ida's column in the paper. I also think that the title included the many discussions the former town members had at the cemetery.


message 10: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) I also thought the title could refer to both Ida's column and to the way the "residents" of Still Meadows were so engaged and talkative.


message 11: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) Which character was your favorite, and why?


message 12: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) I just love Elner. Of course I was already familiar with her from having read Can't Wait to Get to Heaven


message 13: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Proctor  | 22 comments I really latched on to Katrina. Maybe it was because that was the first character that was introduced. She was a wholesome lady. I also liked Elner too. I like the bizzare old ladies (take Grandma Mazur from the Stephanie Plum novels). I think it was hard to NOT like a character in this story. Even the Bonnie and Clyde story made me chuckle.


message 14: by Katrina (new)

Katrina (katrina030303) | 1 comments Book Concierge wrote: "Is this the first book by Flagg that you've read? If not, what others have you enjoyed?"
I have, of course, read "Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe", but also "Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man" and "Welcome to the World, Baby Girl!". I honestly haven't read anything she has written since 2000.


message 15: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) Tiffany wrote: "Even the Bonnie and Clyde story made me chuckle. ..."

I loved that scene!


message 16: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) Where did you think the "residents" of Still Meadows went when they disappeared?"


message 17: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Proctor  | 22 comments The ending was so surprising to me. I started to wonder if "living" in the cemetery was like a gateway to heaven. I wondered if there was certain criteria a person must meet to proceed to heaven, but I was unsure of them. (This is an interesting question)


message 18: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) Tiffany wrote: "The ending was so surprising to me. ..."

I also thought that they would be going "to heaven." The ending / epilogue was a definite surprise ... and I'm not sure I liked it.


message 19: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) Rate and review ....


message 20: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) The Whole Town's Talking by Fannie Flagg
The Whole Town’s Talking – Fannie Flagg – 3***
This is Flagg’s fourth book about the residents of Elmwood Springs. In this volume, she tells the history of Elmwood Springs, beginning with the 1889 founding of the settlement and up to about 2020. This isn’t great literature, but Flagg spins a darn good yarn. It’s entertaining and full of lively characters.
LINK to my review


message 21: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany Proctor  | 22 comments One of Flagg's other books was a well known movie. If this was to become a movie, who would you like to see play some of the characters.


message 22: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) Tiffany wrote: "One of Flagg's other books was a well known movie. If this was to become a movie, who would you like to see play some of the characters."

I think Kathy Bates might make a great Elner!


message 23: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10022 comments Mod
Many thanks to The Book Concierge for hosting June's group read! Nice job!!!!


back to top