Women's Classic Literature Enthusiasts discussion

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My Cousin Rachel > Week 1 Chap. 1 through 6

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message 1: by Charlene (new)

Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
Discussion for Chapters 1 through 6


message 2: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 193 comments I hope others will be reading this, because it is really good!

This is my first duMaurier, and she can certainly write complex and compelling characters. I've finished this section, and am still puzzling about Philip. Don't know if I like him or not ...


message 3: by Laurie (new)

Laurie I will be reading this, but I haven't started yet. The only Du Maurier I have read prior to this is Rebecca and the short story, The Birds. Both were very good so I look forward to this book. I plan to start tomorrow.


message 4: by Charlene (new)

Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
Laurie wrote: "I will be reading this, but I haven't started yet. The only Du Maurier I have read prior to this is Rebecca and the short story, The Birds. Both were very good so I look forward to this book. I pla..."

I know on my paperback book it compared My Cousin Rachel's atmosphere to Rebecca. To be honest, when I read this the first time, I didn't really think the setting had the same atmosphere as Rebecca's Manderley. This book's atmosphere is in my opinion very different.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 351 comments I already reread for 2 other groups a couple of months ago. Will join discussion on the final thread. :)


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 315 comments This book was previously BOTM for two groups on GR where I'm a member.

Now it's BOTM here AND BOTM for July for another group I read with on GR.

This book is so popular right now.


message 7: by Laurie (new)

Laurie I've read through chapter 6, and I'm really enjoying it so far. Of course, we haven't actually seen cousin Rachel yet so the anticipation has built to a high level. And the first chapter gave such a teasing preview of the downfall she brings to Philip eventually, so I am quite keen for her to meet him. I agree that I don't yet see the similarity to Manderly in any way but maybe that will change.


message 8: by Charlene (new)

Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
Kathleen wrote: "I hope others will be reading this, because it is really good!

This is my first duMaurier, and she can certainly write complex and compelling characters. I've finished this section, and am still p..."


My first impression of Phillip is that he comes off as a spoiled brat.


message 9: by Charlene (new)

Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
We are never told the time period when the story occurs. When do you think the story took place?


message 10: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new)

Anastasia Kinderman | 649 comments Mod
Isn't a movie based on this book coming out?


message 11: by Charlene (new)

Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
Anastasia wrote: "Isn't a movie based on this book coming out?"

It comes out in theaters on Friday June 9 in the United States. I am not sure if June 9 is the release date worldwide or not.


message 12: by Laurie (new)

Laurie I think the time frame is mid to late 19th century. The depiction of the travel time to Italy, locally riding in carriages, and Philip's farm workers and house servants coming to Philip in person each Saturday to collect wages (in a future chapter) remind me of the setting of Far From the Madding Crowd. Hardy's book was published in 1874 and was presumably set around that time. This seems so similar to me that its my best guess at this point that the time period is close.


message 13: by Charlene (new)

Charlene Morris | 1112 comments Mod
Laurie wrote: "I think the time frame is mid to late 19th century. The depiction of the travel time to Italy, locally riding in carriages, and Philip's farm workers and house servants coming to Philip in person e..."

I had originally thought about it being set in the 1820s since there was no mention of the railroad. To me, it seemed like Phillip and Ambrose were wealthy enough that they could afford the railroad if there was one available to use.


message 14: by Mizzou (last edited Jun 13, 2017 05:29PM) (new)

Mizzou | 177 comments The film "My Cousin Rachel" based on DuMaurier's Gothic romance opened here (Twin Cities, MN) Friday, and the local paper had a photo of and article about the 'Rachel' who played the role of the enigmatic 19th century beauty who may have murdered her husband. Rachel Weisz the film actress said she was drawn to the role because "if there is a problem in the depiction of women, it's that the stories rob them of any complexity." She likes that viewers are kept guessing about the character's true nature. "It's a great narrative choice," she said. "It keeps the story very emotional because people watching it are absolutely sure they're right whether she's a bad person or a good person." I was amused to read that the film was "based on a novel by Daphne DuMaurier, whose "macabre works" also inspired the films "Don't Look Now," ""Rebecca," and "The Birds." One other funny bit---Weisz remarked about how "it's wonderful to be in a period film because you have different textures and horses and side-saddle and corsets and costumes." In the photo, the actress has a center part in her straight hair and it is pulled back into a large chignon, and she wears a high-neck, long-sleeved, dark color gown with a shirred bodice and wide, billowing skirt. Veddy, veddy 19th century she appears, standing before a fireplace in a Victorian room, with her hands clasped before her. Oh yes---the article was headlined "In defiance of pigeon-holing"


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