You'll love this one...!! A book club & more discussion

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Group Themed Reads: Discussions > June 2017 - Psychological Thriller

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message 1: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments If those two chosen group reads are not to your liking, feel free to read another book that is set on or under the ocean.

Please discuss your book in this thread.

In order to receive a badge you must:
1. have completed the book before or during June 2017
2. discussed it in this thread. Discussion must be more than "I read the book and I liked it". Discussion requires something more substantial and analytical of what you read, for example, thoughts, opinions, impact it had on you, what was your favourite part, was it what you expected it to be like etc. You may also like to review the book and post a link to the review in this thread.
3. Report that you have read AND discussed the book in the reporting thread (including a brief summary of what you thought of the book).

General Rules:
1. Please mark your spoilers with the spoiler tags along with mentioning what stage of the book you are at so other's don't get a nasty shock.


message 2: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments I will read Mr. Mercedes, but I won't start it until after the toppler. I never read thrillers, but as it is also one of the survey challenge tasks I'll have to give it a go ;-)


message 3: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments Peggy wrote: "I will read Mr. Mercedes, but I won't start it until after the toppler. I never read thrillers, but as it is also one of the survey challenge tasks I'll have to give it a go ;-)"

Don't forget that a few of us read it as a buddy read a few years back so check out the thread. So you can feel like you are part of a group read. :-)


message 4: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments Ah yes, thanks for reminding me!


message 5: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments Oh and I'm sure if you comment in there some of us (me included) will jump in to discuss it and give you comfort if you need it. It is a fantastic book.


message 6: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 47984 comments Peggy, be prepared to want to read the next two books in the series right away. It's a great trilogy. I'll likely pop in to discuss it with you too.


message 7: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments Great! Looking forward to it :)

I do like the idea behind the book. It's so comparable to some recent events and I've always been interested in the 'why' (mostly psychological, how do these people think, how did they get to such acts, are they ill, was there something in their childhood) when things like shootings, trucks-in-crowds, bombs, murders etc. happen. I hope it also comes back in this book.


message 8: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments Mr. Mercedes definitely relates to some of the things going on in the world now. I may pop in to discuss with you too, though I read it a while ago. I also really enjoyed the series.


Laura (Lclwags) (lclwags) | 504 comments I would like to read And Then There Were None if I have time. I bought the book during the audible 2 for 1 sale planning to read it for the thriller theme, but June has become a busy month for me! So many weddings and events!


message 10: by TrudyAn (new)

TrudyAn | 1640 comments I plan to read Blue Monday, categorized on GR as a psychological thriller. This has been sitting on my shelf for awhile and will be one of my toppler reads.


message 11: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments Laura wrote: "I would like to read And Then There Were None if I have time. I bought the book during the audible 2 for 1 sale planning to read it for the thriller theme, but June has become a busy m..."

The there was a buddy read and an old group for this book too so hunt it out for what other people thought of it.


message 12: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments I have so many psychological thrillers that I'd love to read. I'm going to read one of the chosen books but if i have time i might fit in Into the Darkest Corner which is what i nominated for the theme.


message 13: by Sarah, Moderator (last edited Jun 01, 2017 11:44AM) (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments I'll be curious about your thoughts on the book Peggy given the recent events. When we read in, not many events like that had happened. I'm wondering if it will have a different impact on you compared to us then. It makes me think that a reread might be in order at some point.


message 14: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments I hope to read additional books to fit the theme as well, Sarah.


message 15: by Roz (new)

Roz | 3568 comments I'll be reading The Night Sister but I'm also going to read The Girl from the Sea.


message 16: by Margo (new)

Margo | 9610 comments I read In the Woods, I finished it today. It was an excellent Dublin based mystery story.

This book focused on Detective Rob Ryan, his troubled past and his intense relationship his work partner Cassie Maddox. Ryan is very much the flawed hero. His inability to form/maintain relationships forms much of the basis for this novel. What I liked most about it was that the murder investigation became very much secondary to the development of the character dynamics.

Very well written and expertly paced. A great read that I highly recommend.


message 17: by Roz (last edited Jun 04, 2017 07:43AM) (new)

Roz | 3568 comments I read The Girl from the Sea.
The story is about a woman who almost drowned and is suffering from amnesia. Slowly she regains her memories, not all at once. I expect a psychological thriller to have tension and have an offness to it for most of the length of the book. Not this one. For large parts I felt it dragged, or was boy-girl dippy. Some parts made me laugh at the character's stupidity, or some of the dialogue. But at the end it picked up. Of course the one the main character least expected was the one the reader knew was not who he seemed to be. Just when I thought I had it all figure out (the who done it part) the twist came. In the end, we can't all be right.
All in all, it was a 50 - 50 read. I would give it 3 1/2 stars if I could. I couldn't bring this one up to 4 so I'll stick with 3.


message 18: by TrudyAn (new)

TrudyAn | 1640 comments I read Blue Monday. Over 20 years ago, a five year old girl disappears without a trace. Fast forward to present day, a boy disappears in the same community. The two cases couldn't possibly be linked, or could they? MC Freida Klein is a psychotherapist, and sessions with one of her clients has caused her to wonder if he is involved with the boy's disappearance.

There are some good twists in this story, one of which took me totally by surprise. I didn't like the MC, who seemed to have questionable ethical standards and be lacking in judgement. The book was a quick read, and as far as psychological thrillers go, it was okay. I gave it three stars.


message 19: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments Will you carry on the series Margo?


message 20: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments I've just started Black-Eyed Susans for the toppler and yearly challenge. I'm excited for it, as it has some really good reviews including from some of my GR friends. I come back to let you know what I think of it later.


message 21: by Margo (new)

Margo | 9610 comments Sarah wrote: "Will you carry on the series Margo?"

Yes - my mum has them all on audible. I'm even more keen now that I have been told that each book is about a different member of the squad. Great idea for a series :-)


message 22: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 47984 comments Margo wrote: "Sarah wrote: "Will you carry on the series Margo?"

Yes - my mum has them all on audible. I'm even more keen now that I have been told that each book is about a different member of the squad. Great..."


The first book I read in the series was Faithful Place. I think I'm a little in love with Frank Mackie. LOL!


message 23: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments I enjoy the writing style of the series so I really want to get stuck in to the series. But I don't want to whip through it too quickly.


message 24: by Tejas Janet (new)

Tejas Janet (tejasjanet) | 3513 comments Margo wrote: "I read In the Woods, I finished it today. It was an excellent Dublin based mystery story.

This book focused on Detective Rob Ryan, his troubled past and his intense relationship his..."


I'm looking forward to reading this one a little later this month. It looks really good.


message 25: by Margo (new)

Margo | 9610 comments Janet I hope you enjoy it as much as I did :-)


message 26: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments I finished Black-Eyed Susans. I really enjoyed the writing. I was engaged the entire time and wanted to know what was going to happen. The end was a bit lacking in my opinion, but not really bad. I just didn't care for it much. I can see how others might love it though. Otherwise, I thought the book was great. I would certainly read more by this author.


message 27: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments I started Mr Mercedes today. Only 10% in, but it seems to be a fast-paced book and I'm already finding it hard to put down.


message 28: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments It is definitly a fast paced story. I was on the edge of my seat the whole time. I am really pleased you are liking it so far Peggy.


message 29: by Roz (new)

Roz | 3568 comments I'm reading Nutshell and I have to say it's one of the strangest books I've read. It's taking me a while. I'm not sure I like it -- some days I do, some I don't. It took me a while to get into. It's a story told from the point of view of a fetus. Unique if nothing else.


message 30: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments Hm, sounds like that might work for the monthly challenge (experimental books) as well!


message 31: by Roz (new)

Roz | 3568 comments I didn't even think of that. I may use it for the monthly. So odd.


message 32: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments I'm about 25% done with Mr Mercedes. I'm intrigued by (view spoiler)

I'll have a look at the buddy read tonight or tomorrow.


message 33: by Margo (new)

Margo | 9610 comments Peggy (view spoiler)


message 34: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments Yes, Peggy. I recently had a conversation with my husband about (view spoiler)


message 35: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 47984 comments This discussion is interesting. I just finished reading The Long Hard Road Out of Hell by Marilyn Manson. The book ended in 1999 and I wanted to know a little more about his life since then. I found a documentary on him so watched it yesterday. He was blamed for the Columbine massacre. He said that the backlash from that tragedy was so bad that it was as if he had pulled the trigger himself. His music and performance art is actually anti-violence. His act draws attention to the violence with an aim to make people think and to contemplate how we live our lives, and to question things. Of course, it's all in the interpretation. In the ensuing investigation of the tragedy, it was revealed that the two killers were not even Marilyn Manson fans, and yet, people continued to lay fault on him. The venue cancelled the concert he was scheduled to do in the area, and he personally cancelled 5 concerts as a result of the backlash.

One of King's books, Rage, depicted high school shootings. A number of subsequent shootings were linked to the book, in that the shooters had copies of the book. One even wrote an essay about the book prior to carrying out his own rage.

King took the book out of publication. From Wikipedia - King said, in his keynote address at the VEMA Annual Meeting on May 26, 1999: "The Carneal incident was enough for me. I asked my publisher to take the damned thing out of print. They concurred." King went on to describe his view on this subject, which acknowledged the role that cultural or artistic products such as Rage play in influencing individuals, particularly troubled youths, while also declaring that artists and writers should not be denied the aesthetic opportunity to draw upon their own culture—which is suffused with violence, according to King—in their work. King went on to describe his inspiration for stories such as Rage, which drew heavily upon his own frustrations and pains as a high school student."

That was rather long-winded, but it addresses how artists and writers can be vilified for others' actions. Is Stephen King to blame for someone else's actions that mirror something he wrote in a book? The blame game really needs to stop. People need to be held accountable for their own actions. Yes, he wrote a book that described a man plowing into a crowd with a car with the intention of killing as many as possible. Yes, the book talks about blowing up a concert with young girls in attendance. I figure that if King can conceive the idea, so can others.


message 36: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments I agree with you Janice. If you put a little time into thinking about 'best' locations to blow yourself up, a concert is a logical place. In countries like Iraq or Afganisthan it often seems to happen at crowded markets. I think many people can come up with it without having to read about it first.

I remember with Columbine that blame was placed on black metal or heavy metal bands the killers listened to, and also the violent computer games they played. But there are millions of people playing those games and listening to that music. There must have been more serious things going on in their lives, and I'm pretty sure they would have committed there crimes as well if they had other hobbies. It just fits so well with the murders (in the eyes of some) that it's easy to blame. It's really sad that artists feel forced to cancel shows or stop printing of books.


message 37: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments Ihate it when musicians, films, computer games and books are blamed for some atrocities. The Bulger killers back in the 90's here blamed (or someone blamed anyway) the film Child's Play as I recall. I watched quite a few 18 rated films way before I should have but i never killed anyone, just like Peggy said. I also hate that people have to cancel stuff and take things out of circulation because of what others think or because they are blamed. If someone is going to hurt or kill someone on a small or mass scale, they're going to do it anyway regardless of what they read, watch or listen to. So what if they happened to like that band or author, they also might of eaten Kelloggs cornflakes but they don't get taken off the shelves.


message 38: by Tejas Janet (new)

Tejas Janet (tejasjanet) | 3513 comments I agree with you both, Sarah and Peggy. And what about those instances where the attacker turns out to be someone regarded as polite, mild mannered, etc, and not even any sign of supposed antisocial/violent negative influences from books, games, movies, or whatever? We hear about such cases as well.


message 39: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments Just to be clear, I was not blaming the author in my spoiler. My suggestion was simply that people sometimes get ideas from art / fiction. I agree with you all. I think they would do something anyway. It's just how they choose to attain their goal that may change. They may want to kill a lot of people for whatever reason, then read, watch, or listen to something and think that it is an easy or creative way to accomplish what they want to.

I'm not saying that art should be censored either. Even if there was no violence in any form of art, the people that want to kill others will find a way. It's unfortunate that things have been cancelled or taken off of shelves.

I think it's really unfair when artists are blamed for the evils of others, especially when their art is misinterpreted. Perhaps people should shift their focus to more preventative measures. Do we need mental health care reform? Support systems for people at risk? (How is it Rusalka described them? 2nd generation immigrants?) etc. Without moving the conversation in a political direction, I think we need to find creative ways to reduce these incidents.

On a separate note, I wonder if the artists have guilt after an event like this when their art is used or blamed to harm others. I bet many do, even if it isn't their fault.


message 40: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments I didn't think that Kristie :)

On your last note: I agree, they might feel that way. Even though they obviously never intended for it to happen and do not blame their own work, when so many people rally against you I can imagine you start to wonder 'what if?'.

I notice that the book makes me feel uneasy and that's not a good feeling to go to sleep with, so I'm making this my train book and will read something happy and fluffy in the evenings.


message 41: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments It's a good train book, Peggy. Definitely not a bedtime book. My brain was too awake and I couldn't stop thinking about it when I tried to read it before bed. It is definitely creepy.


message 42: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 47984 comments I didn't get the impression that you were pointing the finger at King, Kristie. It's unfortunate, but others (as in general public spurred by the media perhaps) do place blame. I took your comment and went to the next step. Maybe I wouldn't have if I hadn't just watched that documentary.

Both Marilyn Manson and Stephen King did feel guilty - Manson cancelled concerts and King pulled a book from publication.


message 43: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments That's too bad, Janice. I would be so upset to think that I'm singing about anti-violence and someone blamed violence on it, even if it was found to be untrue. That documentary sounds fascinating. I may have to see if I can hunt it down at some point, maybe on Netflix.


message 44: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 47984 comments I found it on YouTube.

I made the comment "it's all in the interpretation". I've read Manson's book and watched some of his videos. They look violent to me. But he says that he's anti-violent.


message 45: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments Oh, interesting. I think a lot is in the interpretation. I was just discussing that today on a different topic. Thanks for letting me know it's on YouTube.


message 46: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments I'm about halfway through now. You know those cliche horror movies where you (view spoiler)


message 47: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments I'm almost 75% done. It's still a page turner, but there were also some parts that I found a bit cliche and predictable. Still enjoying it though, and I'm curious to find out what will happen in the last part.


message 48: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 14867 comments Finished! I ended up giving it 4 stars. In addition to the cliche and predictable parts there were also some parts that were a bit unbelievable ((view spoiler) I might read the other books in the series if someone can tell me that they are similar in style and don't suddenly turn out to be horror books.

I'm glad I read a book that I would normally never have picked up.


message 49: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 13242 comments Peggy, I think the next one is similar. That final one adds a paranormal aspect, but I don't recall it having additional horror or gore. Getting an additional opinion might be good though, because I often enjoy those types of stories.


message 50: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18170 comments I agree with Kristie. I think you'd be fine with the rest. Although my tolerance for gore is higher than most. But from what I recall they are similar in levels of everything to the first one. The last one is definitely different but that's about it. I'm really pleased you liked it. If you want to try other King books which aren't horror, check out 11/22/63 and Joyland.


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