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All Things Writing & Publishing > Gender Bias - publishing, reviewing, publicity

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message 1: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Since sidetracking seems to keep happening, I thought I'd start another thread here :)

I posted a couple of articles in the thread, so here are the links again:

https://www.theguardian.com/books/201...

http://jezebel.com/homme-de-plume-wha...

Let's discuss away!


message 2: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13072 comments Categorizing and stereotyping is probably in our instincts. We need consciousnesses to override that.
Lit agents, publishers, whatever having to sift through tons of applications might well have a bias and I wouldn't be surprised if thrillers, for example, were received more cordially from male authors and women's fic from female, stereotyped as gender -sensitive genres.. They'd each need (often totally undeservedly) to bear some additional burden of proof..
Yeah, it's not a gender issue, but I guess it's representative to a degree. That's an extract from the review of Mortal Showdown on one of the popular sites:

"...
First off, between downloading the ebook and starting to read, I attempted to do some research regarding the author, Nik Krasno, to get a feel for his writing style to understand what I was getting myself into.
.....
Considering the author was born in Kiev, I expected to find some grammatical and syntax errors.
..."

I guess, I too need to overcome some initial mistrust -:)


message 3: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Nik wrote: "Categorizing and stereotyping is probably in our instincts. We need consciousnesses to override that.
Lit agents, publishers, whatever having to sift through tons of applications might well have a ..."


Can't believe someone actually wrote that, Nik! Crikey!

There's quite a lot of evidence that female authors often choose gender neutral names to publish under, or even to submit to publishers and agents, because men will subconsciously (or consciously in some cases) choose not to buy books written by women. That's actually why JK Rowling is JK and not Joanne.

This is another interesting article, about book characters and children.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/postev...

And here's an old blog post from me:

https://leonierogers.me/2017/03/08/po...


message 4: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7084 comments Interesting.


message 5: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2101 comments If it makes you feel better, we've been seeing a backlash in the Hugo Awards with voters casting no-vote votes in categories without diverse representation. At least in Science fiction, we're seeing a message sent that you don't have to be white and male to write great fiction.


message 6: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Yes - I've been following the Sad/Rabid Puppies drama with interest. I have voted the last couple of years (not this one) myself.

That first year was fascinating when the 'slate voting' happened the first time. Well, fascinating and infuriating.


message 7: by Alex (new)

Alex (asato) Do Men Receive Bigger Book Advances Than Women?
(Posted on December 11, 2015)

What's interesting is the genre breakdown. For example, in Thriller category, male author deals far outnumber female author deals and it's inverted in Romance.
"it’s possible to consult one resource that offers directionally useful information: the Publishers Marketplace deals database. PM has been collecting information on book deals self-reported by agents and publishers since 2000. Key word: self-reported. It is not a catalogue of all publishing deals made, but it’s the best insight we’ve got. Many publishing insiders subscribe to the service, which includes a weekday e-mail newsletter called Publishers Lunch, a members database, and other excellent features. (I’ve been a subscriber for many years.)"

(https://janefriedman.com/book-advance...)



message 8: by Alex (new)

Alex (asato) Thanks, Leonie for the enlightening yet frustrating article:

Homme de Plume: What I Learned Sending My Novel Out Under a Male Name


message 9: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Alex wrote: "Thanks, Leonie for the enlightening yet frustrating article:

Homme de Plume: What I Learned Sending My Novel Out Under a Male Name"


No worries, Alex. I thought it would be interesting for most people.


message 10: by Nat (new)

Nat Kennedy | 29 comments I've read that article before and it's a bit disheartening.


message 11: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments I think it's really important to acknowledge though, because unless we do, things will never change.


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