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Miscellaneous > Wall Street Fearless Girl and urinating dog :((

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message 1: by Robert (new)

Robert Smart | 343 comments Hi everyone, I saw this in the news today and it burnt me up! For those of you that didn't see the story I will post the link below. But basically an artist made a sculpture of a urinating dog and placed it beside the Fearless Girl statue on Wall Street in New York so that the dog was peeing on her! I believe in free speech and so on but how low can someone go! Really!


Artist Protests 'Fearless Girl' By Installing Urinating Dog At Her Feet

https://www.yahoo.com/news/artist-pro...


I decided I wanted to have a 'gripe' session about this so please post your comments!


message 2: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments I think that is definitely below the belt's line, as a German saying goes. (And yeah, it refers to a man's body).

Free speech protects you from persecution by the state, it does NOT mean that we can just say anything we want without being critizised.

It's really, really sad, and shows just how much more work needs to be done!


message 3: by Pam (last edited May 30, 2017 04:08PM) (new)

Pam | 1071 comments Mod
I find this fascinating. We have "art" being built upon "art." Its an evolving piece.

From link: Sculptor Alex Gardega told The New York Post that the proud, gangly young woman “is corporate nonsense. It has nothing to do with feminism,”

I kinda agree with him. I wasnt enthralled by this proud little girl being a homage to feminism. BUT im enthralled by the idea more and more as she continues to be harassed. Not bc of any perversion. Instead to me now her pose and little profile makes sense. Now she is doing something. She is enduring. She is triumphing against ridiculousness. And her visage will continue to be a spunky, resilient profile.


message 4: by Robert (new)

Robert Smart | 343 comments Pam wrote: "I find this fascinating. We have "art" being built upon "art." Its an evolving piece.

From link: Sculptor Alex Gardega told The New York Post that the proud, gangly young woman “is corporate nons..."


I kind of like that view actually. Thank you Pam.


message 5: by Britt (new)

Britt | 123 comments Pam wrote: "Instead to me now her pose and little profile makes sense. Now she is doing something. She is enduring. She is triumphing against ridiculousness. And her visage will continue to be a spunky, resilient profile. "

This is what I thought too! This probably wasn't the Dog's Artist's intention, but it definitely had this effect on me.

However, I agree that the whole act is kind of disgusting... :/


message 6: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments Pam wrote: "I find this fascinating. We have "art" being built upon "art." Its an evolving piece.

From link: Sculptor Alex Gardega told The New York Post that the proud, gangly young woman “is corporate nons..."


Nevertheless, she persisted:)


message 7: by Winston (new)

Winston | 180 comments I think griping is fine, but it's important that artists continue to do things that push our own boundaries and give them voices.

In this example, it seems anti-feminist, but the artist was intending to showcase that the "Fearless Girl" is simply more corporate bullshit (ha)

Additionally, Fearless Girl is already stepping on the Bull statue as it is, taking what is meant to be a representation of American growth into a feminist culture, and putting the Bull in negative light against the Girl.


This reminds me of the Naked Trump (https://patch.com/new-york/new-york-c...)
and Naked Hillary (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/statue-of...)

And while Trump was generally mocked wholeheartedly but a woman took it upon themselves to damage the Hilary statue. However these are almost identical expressions of art, and in my view equally valid.

Similarly, showing different viewpoints, is the Bull, the Fearless Girl, and the Peeing Dog.

And we ought to be applauding all of these expressions (and the fact we can do this as a society without jailing someone)


message 8: by Gerd (new)

Gerd | 428 comments Well, as art goes I think he has a point.
He did describe his person to a t with his installment. :)


message 9: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments Winston wrote: "I think griping is fine, but it's important that artists continue to do things that push our own boundaries and give them voices.

In this example, it seems anti-feminist, but the artist was intend..."


The three statues represent three different attitudes toward society, at least that's what crossed my mind now. There are people like Trump who are represented by the bull, then there are activists, even as young as little girls, who are represented by the little fearless girl and then there are the people who don't want to interact with the society too much at all, and they figuratively piss at the other two. Wow, what did my mind make up in that short time now?


message 10: by Winston (new)

Winston | 180 comments MeerderWörter wrote: "Winston wrote: "I think griping is fine, but it's important that artists continue to do things that push our own boundaries and give them voices.

In this example, it seems anti-feminist, but the a..."


That's a good analysis of the statues. But I think my point is more that all art is good art, including the pissing dog, because we can talk about it. And getting mad because the dog seems disrespectful to your (non-specific) perceptions.

Sort of in contrast to Robert's OP, about "believ[ing] in free speech and so on but how low can someone go!"

Like. You can disagree with the message, but I think we should applaud the voice willing to speak their mind.


message 11: by Holly (last edited May 31, 2017 11:08AM) (new)

Holly (goldikova) Perhaps the dog is just meant to be a dog, behaving as dogs will. They are not human, and as such, do not recognize human society; they have their own social form: the pack. As domesticated as it may be, the dog is a natural creature retaining most of the same instincts as it's wild cousins.

To me the dog is a representative of nature, which is unconcerned with the struggles of human society. Societies rise and fall but nature is eternal and all powerful. Nature cares nothing for politics or the struggles of humans.

(As a real world example, my dog will urinate on the stone monument engraved with the ten commandments that stands outside the neighborhood church. He is not expressing his opinion of christianity, he is just performing bodily and social functions by marking his territory)


message 12: by Ross (new)

Ross | 1444 comments Perhaps someone should create a bullfighter killing the bull see what that does to the it's only art argument. It is both art and insult so my proposal would address both.


message 13: by James (new)

James Corprew Pam wrote: "I find this fascinating. We have "art" being built upon "art." Its an evolving piece.
."


I guess you can say the artists are pissing each other off.

Duh dun dun.

Thank you, thank you, i will be here all week! lol


message 14: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1071 comments Mod
Hahaha. Goober. 😊


message 15: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments Keith wrote: "Had a read of the Twitter feed #FearlessGirl and the bull, it seems, was supposed to represent the 'strength and power of the American people' when it was erected in 1989.

Following this notion, ..."


Yeah, that uh, is a valid question:) Oh my god, you make me laugh so much... He is pissing of a lot of people!


message 16: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Sheen  | 23 comments It's good to see that this group is recognizing that Alex Gardega's not trying to make an anti-feminist statement with his Pissing Pug, but a more abstruse statement about art.

The sculptor behind the charging bull objects to the Fearless Girl because he considers that it's not an independent piece of art; rather, it depends on his art for its meaning -- which is true. Placed anywhere else, Fearless Girl would have a very different meaning.

The consensus response seems to be -- and I agree with this -- that it's a nonsensical objection: Artists creating art reacting to or commenting on other art is a practice as old as art itself. Caryatid That Has Fallen Under The Weight Of Her Stone, anyone?

Gardega's retort is, essentially, "Oh, yeah? Well, if you can react with art that reframes someone else's then I can respond to yours the same way! So here's a half-assed sculpture that exists for no other reason than to offend you for creating art that re-casts someone else's art as a villain! I have as much right as you do, right???"

Which, of course, he has.... A fact that makes him no less a jerk for the specifics of his choice.


message 17: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments Jonathan wrote: "It's good to see that this group is recognizing that Alex Gardega's not trying to make an anti-feminist statement with his Pissing Pug, but a more abstruse statement about art.

The sculptor behin..."


What a thoughtful and nailing post, Jonathan, thanks for that.


message 18: by Gerd (new)

Gerd | 428 comments Jonathan wrote: "The sculptor behind the charging bull objects to the Fearless Girl because he considers that it's not an independent piece of art; rather, it depends on his art for its meaning -- which is true. Placed anywhere else, Fearless Girl would have a very different meaning..."

Seems a bit of a nonsensical objection, seeing how his art by itself depends on an outer circumstance itself - put down in a Rodeao arena it would take on an entirely diffrent meaning - which is to say, art never stands on its own.


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