World, Writing, Wealth discussion

29 views
World & Current Events > What are parents' economic obligations?

Comments Showing 1-14 of 14 (14 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14870 comments The scope I imagine might differ depending on the culture and tradition. Some believe they need to provide each kid with an apartment and actively assist financially, others gamble on kid's education as a source of his/her future income, third - believe that once mature kids should completely take care of themselves.
What's your point of view?


message 2: by Scott (new)

Scott | 42 comments Give them the best opportunity to succeed in life. If that means providing them with educational support and opportunities, then I think a parent should do that to the limit of their ability to do so. If it means helping them through a rough patch by keeping them on health insurance until age 25 or helping out with the rent, then I think a parent should do so.

A parent should not be a source of income for a grown child, however. The idea is to give them the tools to be successful, not to support them for the rest of their lives.


message 3: by Alex (last edited May 30, 2017 10:28AM) (new)

Alex (asato) Why not pave the way for their careers if you can? President Trump has done that for his children.
"In 2001, a year after he graduated from college, Donald Jr. went to work for his dad for the second time. (The first time was when he was 13 and earning minimum wage plus tips as a dock attendant at Trump Castle.)
...
"Ivanna is an executive vice president of acquisitions and development for The Trump Organization. But she didn't go straight from The Wharton School to an office at Trump Tower. She worked for real estate developer Bruce Ratner for a year after college."

(http://www.businessinsider.com/meet-d...)



message 4: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14870 comments Scott wrote: "The idea is to give them the tools to be successful, not to support them for the rest of their lives...."

A sound approach. It might be a bit spoiling when kids have nothing to aspire for or achieve on their own..


message 5: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14870 comments Alex G wrote: "Why not pave the way for their careers if you can? President Trump has done that for his children...."

... And on the other side of the globe, Putin's daughters are so mysteriously out of media coverage, that the internet is mostly filled with rumors as to their career...


message 6: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 10656 comments My view was I would help support my children through University, but once out, I expected them to get a job and support themselves. And they did. Each of them is probably better off financially than me now, so I'm consider that a success.

As for Putin's daughters, I think Vlad has really done the right thing. (That will probably bring a ton of stuff down on my head, but, well, I cannot lie . . .)


message 7: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5776 comments I agree. Protect your family.

As to the thread question, I ask myself that all the time. I just talked to a friend who has kids right out of college. They have jobs. He told me that he had made a good bit of extra money last year doing a teaching job (he's retired), and I asked him what he was going to do with it. He said that he's spent most of it on his kids. My extra money goes to my grown son, also, as he still needs financial help. I could spend the money on myself, but I don't need much at this point in my life. Is this wrong?


message 8: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 10656 comments Scout, it is your money; do with it what you will. I think you should encourage your children to be self-sufficient, but if they cannot, of course help them.


message 9: by Scott (new)

Scott | 42 comments Nik wrote: "Scott wrote: "The idea is to give them the tools to be successful, not to support them for the rest of their lives...."

A sound approach. It might be a bit spoiling when kids have nothing to aspir..."


Agreed, I want my kids to be better off than I was, but that's a difficult goal in today's world. It was easier for me to do better than my parents than it is for them to do better than me...

And most people don't have the means to be their kids' unending financial support crutch...


message 10: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14870 comments What economic springboard, if any, should parents give their children in your opinion?


message 11: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 10656 comments I believe support in terms of health and education, and having given them some basic skills, like driving a car. Of course some parents cannot offer much support because they are strapped for cash themselves. If a parent is any good, h or she will want their child to succeed, so will do what they can, but they should not wreck their own future doing it.


message 12: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5776 comments I supported my son way longer than a parent is expected to provide support. I despaired at times, when he was taking drugs and became almost unrecognizable as my son. I'm glad I persevered, despite advice to the contrary. He's now doing well at a job he trained for, has a good partner, and is self-sufficient. Still, I know things could go wrong at any time, but parents always know that.


message 13: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 10656 comments Well done, Scout, and I am [pleased this seems to have had a good outcome.


message 14: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5776 comments Thanks, Ian. Not popular to say this, I know, but I believe prayer helped. Maybe even if you don't believe in a higher power, positive focused energy has power.


back to top