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World & Current Events > Facebook: How much of your personal life are you giving away for free?

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message 1: by Alex (last edited May 29, 2017 07:23PM) (new)

Alex (asato) I just started using it more, but this article certainly gave me pause.

If you do, it would be instructive to see how much personal data you're giving away for free.

How Facebook's tentacles reach further than you think

One map shows how everything - from the links we post on Facebook, to the pages we like, to our online behaviour in many other corners of cyber-space that are owned or interact with the company (Instagram, WhatsApp or sites that merely use your Facebook log-in) - could all be entering a giant algorithmic process.

And that process allows Facebook to target users with terrifying accuracy, with the ability to determine whether they like Korean food, the length of their commute to work, or their baby's age.

Another map details the permissions many of us willingly give Facebook via its many smartphone apps, including the ability to read all text messages, download files without permission, and access our precise location.

Individually, these are powerful tools; combined they amount to a data collection engine that, Mr Joler argues, is ripe for exploitation.

Mr Joler, though, while admitting that his research made him a little paranoid about the information that was being harvested, is more worried about the longer term.

The data will remain in the hands of one company. Even if its current leaders are responsible and trustworthy, what about those in charge in 20 years?

Analysts say Share Lab's work is valuable and impressive. "It's probably the most comprehensive work mapping Facebook that I've ever seen," says Dr Julia Powles, an expert in technology law and policy at Cornell Tech.

"[The research] shows in cold and calculated terms how much we are giving away for the value of being able to communicate with your mates," she says.

The scale of Facebook's reach can be stated in raw numbers - but Share Lab's maps make it visceral, in a way that drawing parallels cannot.

"We haven't really got appropriate historical analogies for the tech giants," explains Dr Powles. Their powers, she continues, extend "far beyond" the likes of the East India Company and monopolies of old, such as Standard Oil.

(http://www.bbc.com/news/business-3994...)



message 2: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13101 comments Alex G wrote: "personal data you're giving away for free...."

I'd rather charge, if they asked me. Jeffrey would (will?) probably make them pay -:)
I can hope for them they are not a colossus on the feet of clay, as I hear younger generations migrate to 'newer and cooler' stuff, eventually also purchased by Face


message 3: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Imagine if someone as greedy and unscrupulous as Martin Shkreli (of pharmaceutics overcharge fame) would become CEO of Facebook. Our private lives would then be truly toast!


message 4: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9237 comments I really have no idea what people would make of my Facebook page, but I doubt even Shkreli could make any money from it.


Elizabeth ♛Smart Girls Love Trashy Books♛  (pinkhairedwannabe) | 65 comments I don't really put that much personal information on my FaceBook profile....most info that's there is several years outdated anyway.


message 6: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5206 comments I'm on Facebook because I like to play word games. I'm there under an alias, and none of my information is correct. I'm not giving away anything.


message 7: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9237 comments Scout wrote: "I'm on Facebook because I like to play word games. I'm there under an alias, and none of my information is correct. I'm not giving away anything."

Ha! A variant on fake news!


message 8: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2105 comments I don't think this should come as a surprise to anyone. We're used to using social media as a free platform, but it costs money to keep these sites up and running. When they take the companies public, the investors expect that they make money, and they don't do that from the users who aren't paying for a service. Like Newspapers, they make that money through advertising, but the thing about these platforms is they have an ability to learn about their users in ways the papers and even TV networks never could. Unless one's specific government steps in to disallow this level of data collection, it shouldn't come as a surprise that companies like facebook are taking advantage of users looking for "free."


message 9: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 1020 comments If I remember correctly, the messenger app additionally gives permission for Facebook to use the phone's microphone to eavesdrop on your background conversations for "marketing" purposes, much like smart TV interactivity. This is sooooo creepy to me!


message 10: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7091 comments The bottom line Marie - is what what possible purpose does a corporate have to listen in on your personal conversations.

Given that any organisation listening in is composed of human beings subject to bias, prejudice, and their own personal agendas.


message 11: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 1020 comments Yeah I'm not thrilled about the potential for abuse that comes with the listening permissions. I turn off the TV interactivity (set to "on" as default) and refuse to install FB messenger for this reason. I'm also one of those people who puts black tape over my laptop webcam...a bit like the modern version of Mel Gibson in Conspiracy Theory, I suppose :D.


message 12: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13101 comments Is it just a paranoid me or each time all those automatic updates are downloaded for different software be it on comp or tel, I feel the same amount of kilobytes of some personal info can be travelling back as "synchronization" of a sort ?


message 13: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7091 comments Marie Silk wrote: "Yeah I'm not thrilled about the potential for abuse that comes with the listening permissions. I turn off the TV interactivity (set to "on" as default) and refuse to install FB messenger for this r..."

Cool.


message 14: by Melanie (new)

Melanie Fraser (melaniefraservoiceuk) | 48 comments Marie Silk wrote: "Yeah I'm not thrilled about the potential for abuse that comes with the listening permissions. I turn off the TV interactivity (set to "on" as default) and refuse to install FB messenger for this r..."

I agree with you Marie and cover my laptop webcam too. I'm not on FB, Twitter etc but of course tapping in to our homes via TV and other devices and various methods of snooping by other organisations are happening, I hear. Then there are satellite snoopers too.......


message 15: by Alex (last edited Jun 02, 2017 07:52AM) (new)

Alex (asato) I put a Disney fairy bandaid over my webcam lens.


message 16: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9237 comments I am not going to bother. I can't imagine that anyone would waste time looking at me reading/typing in front of a computer screen. What a waste of a day.


message 17: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 1020 comments Yes! Webcam blockers unite!


message 18: by Alex (new)

Alex (asato) FB CEO Zuckerman tapes over his webcam lens.

I read that a bandaid was more convenient than tape b/c it doesn't have the glue to muck up the lens.


message 19: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 1020 comments Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "The bottom line Marie - is what what possible purpose does a corporate have to listen in on your personal conversations.

Given that any organisation listening in is composed of human beings subjec..."


Amazon is doing this now with Alexa. I can't say I understand the appeal.


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