The Read Around The World Book Club discussion

9 views
June 2017 Kenya > Chapter 30 - 39

Comments Showing 1-3 of 3 (3 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 338 comments Mod
As we are in Kenya, do you feel like you are getting an understanding of the country? Do you feel like you found out things about the country and the people? Has it made you more curious about the country?


message 2: by Milena (new)

Milena Widdowson Dust has made me research Kenya in some depth. I honestly went into this book blind with so very knowledge of any African country in terms of cultures, politics and even history. I feel that in order to connect with this book you do have to research, investigate the unfamiliar, be willing to take time to familiarise with references. I feel I've grown as I have researched. I am amazed that a country with such turbulence, such vastness in terms of geography and society, such violence, continues to find a way forward.

Here are my thoughts for the read chapters:

Isaiah wonders,"What if every human is born with a volume of madness to resolve?" A powerful, striking question, which I continue to mull over and digest.

I thought Nyipir's character was beautifully if tragically encapsulated in his own words in chapter 31: "I used to be a child, before I met a man who walked with power...he showed me how not to be afraid." He also highlights the addiction of hunting men with Hugh.

I am rooting for Ajany, who chose to live despite the pain. She is so strong.

I like how underneath it all, Ali is a storyteller through poetry and song. This has prevailed despite everything else going on. I like his gentler side in these chapters.

Petrus and his belief that 'amnesia' is also a medicine. I cannot get my head around how it is possible to keep the described terror locked away inside and to know that hundreds of thousands of people did so and still do so in the world.

The theme of forgiveness is really strong in this part of the book. It is a brave theme given the pain prevalent throughout. Brave in the face of Kenya's history.

Nypir's naming of the man, who died in his place feels significant. Though he did terrible things and equally did terrible things to forget his input, the names of the persecuted souls still mean something. Humanity still means something.

I loved it when Galgalu says, "Tears are rain. They water soil. Restore life."

The return of Akai- I thought the description of her as an elemental being was perfect. I liked how her character was also used as a narrative tool t as a story teller to fill the timeline of Isaiah and Ajany.


message 3: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 338 comments Mod
Milena wrote: "Dust has made me research Kenya in some depth. I honestly went into this book blind with so very knowledge of any African country in terms of cultures, politics and even history. I feel that in ord..."

The tears are rain quote also really stuck with me. As you know, I have a lot of tears, so I like that sentiment


back to top