Catholic Thought discussion

18 views
Vision of Fatima > Discussion #1: Chapters, 1, 2, 3

Comments Showing 1-15 of 15 (15 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Manny (new)

Manny (virmarl) | 3730 comments Mod
Chapter 1: Beginnings
Fr. McGlynn begins his expedition to meet and show Lucy, the last surviving child of the Fatima apparitions, his prototype sculpture of Our Lady of Fatima to get her approval and possible revisal for the large scale sculpture he intends to create. He departs from New York City on February 1, 1947, and through discussion with those on the plane we get the exposition of the Fatima events of 1917.

Chapter 2: Lisbon
Fr. McGlynn arrives in Lisbon only to find his room for the night is unavailable and needs to go to a suburb to find a hotel room. We get his reflections as jaunts and sightsees and finally settles in the next day at the Dominican monastery, Corpo Sancto.

Chapter 3: Permission
Fr. McGlynn settles in with the other priests and is then taken to the Cardinal of Lisbon to get approval for his mission and an introductory letter to the Bishop of Leiria, which is the diocese which Fatima falls under. From the Bishop he will get permission to meet with Lucy. After a three hour train ride, Fr. McGlynn, along with a Fr. Gardiner, arrive at Leiria and get the Bishop’s consent.


message 2: by John (new)

John Seymour | 167 comments At this point in the book I was really struck by two very pedestrian things - what a pain travel was in 1947, and simultaneously how different.

Second, did it strike any one else as strange that Father McGlynn would travel all the way from the US to Portugal on what must have been an expensive trip at the time, without writing ahead to confirm he would be able to see Sister Lucy? I just didn't understand that.


message 3: by Manny (new)

Manny (virmarl) | 3730 comments Mod
Actually John I was surprise they had scheduled flights in 1947.

Yes, that is odd he would make such a trip without some assurance of sitting with Lucy.


message 4: by Manny (last edited May 27, 2017 07:41PM) (new)

Manny (virmarl) | 3730 comments Mod
I am really enjoying the writing. Fr. McGlynn is a very good writer. He gets a lot if information in while he progresses on his journey. It has the feel of both a pilgrimage and a quest. I especially enjoyed the second chapter where he travels from Lisbon to Estoril back to Lisbon to the monastery to the warship to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wainewright, back to the monastery and then finally to a hotel for the night. All in ten pages.


message 5: by John (new)

John Seymour | 167 comments I agree, the writing is quite good. It goes very quickly.


message 6: by Mike (new)

Mike Manny wrote: "Actually John I was surprise they had scheduled flights in 1947.

Yes, that is odd he would make such a trip without some assurance of sitting with Lucy."


We may want to remember that Lucy was in a convent and under the protection of her dioceses. It could be that the Bishop(s) were receiving numerous requests for meetings.

It does show how passionate he was about the sculpture; perhaps he could wait no longer for an answer.


message 7: by Mike (new)

Mike So far the story is off to a good start, I am enjoying it.


message 8: by Melissa (new)

Melissa | 23 comments Great start. Enjoying a bit of history or a reminder of the time period in history with regards to geography, race, Moors, communication and travel. Have any of you heard of the connection to Our Lady of Fatima and Muslims? I had to search for it again to refresh my memory. Thought I would share.

https://www.ewtn.com/library/mary/oli...


message 9: by Mike (new)

Mike Melissa wrote: "Great start. Enjoying a bit of history or a reminder of the time period in history with regards to geography, race, Moors, communication and travel. Have any of you heard of the connection to Our L..."

That was a very interesting article, thank you for posting it.


message 10: by Manny (new)

Manny (virmarl) | 3730 comments Mod
I am aware, Melissa, that Fatima was the name of Mohammed's daughter. There are some that think the coincidence will help convert some Muslims to Catholicism. Anything that helps in that endeavor is a good thing. But I don't see why they would just because of that. If they reject Mohammed, which is what they would have to do to convert, then what difference does it make that his daughter was named Fatima? I don't understand the logic. But it is interesting to note.


message 11: by Gerri (new)

Gerri Bauer (gerribauer) | 169 comments Really enjoying the book. Appreciate the way Fr. McGlynn makes me feel as though I'm traveling along with him. Wonderful descriptions - he's very observant of everything around him.


message 12: by Mike (new)

Mike Gerri wrote: "Really enjoying the book. Appreciate the way Fr. McGlynn makes me feel as though I'm traveling along with him. Wonderful descriptions - he's very observant of everything around him."

He does bring us into the picture and I also enjoy that.


message 13: by Manny (new)

Manny (virmarl) | 3730 comments Mod
Gerri wrote: "Really enjoying the book. Appreciate the way Fr. McGlynn makes me feel as though I'm traveling along with him. Wonderful descriptions - he's very observant of everything around him."

Yes, he takes the reader on a pilgrimage, but it's even more than that. I realized today that McGlynn takes the reader on an intellectual journey. We are learning the Fatima events along with Fr. McGlynn. In 1947, those events weren't clear to the world and we can see how many times McGlynn tries to clarify things. As he learns, we learn. Or at least I am learning.


message 14: by Lisa (new)

Lisa | 182 comments I'm enjoying learning more about Fatima. Fr. McGlynn has a wonderful way of painting a picture with his writing so that you can truly visualize what he was experiencing.


message 15: by Kerstin (new)

Kerstin | 1352 comments Mod
It also struck me that some of the people he met were kind of nonchalant in regards to the miracles of Fatima. They were desensitized to the extraordinary. This made me think: at every Mass we witness a miracle at the moment of consecration, yet we can be so desensitized about the Eucharist.


back to top