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Spirit Of Catholicism (New Ark Library)
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Ashley | 92 comments Mod
I'll be discussing Karl Adam's "Spirit of Catholicism" here. Feel free to join in! My goal is to finish by the end of June.


Ashley | 92 comments Mod
I just started the Spirit of Catholicism. Just a heads up if you can't find it at your library (I couldn't at mine): It's only a few dollars on Amazon for a kindle version if you have a kindle.

I can tell this book is going to require a lot more concentration than the past few religious books I've read, but I'm up for the challenge! I am curious about the author's viewpoint of the Jesuits, since he has frequently used the word in a bad sense in the first few pages. I know the topic of Jesuits is somewhat controversial even now, but I'm thinking when this book was written it was probably more of an issue.


message 3: by Susan (new)

Susan | 7 comments Ashley wrote: "I just started the Spirit of Catholicism. Just a heads up if you can't find it at your library (I couldn't at mine): It's only a few dollars on Amazon for a kindle version if you have a kindle.

I..."


Father Malachi Martin wrote a book called "Jesuits: the Society of Jesus and the betrayal of the Roman Catholic Chuch" if you were interested in checking it out.


Ashley | 92 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "Ashley wrote: "I just started the Spirit of Catholicism. Just a heads up if you can't find it at your library (I couldn't at mine): It's only a few dollars on Amazon for a kindle version if you hav..."

Thanks for the suggestion! I am interested to see what that has to say!


Ashley | 92 comments Mod
Ok, I finally finished it! It took me longer than I anticipated. Here are my overall thoughts:

This is definitely not a light read. I really had to concentrate to take it all in. The way the author wrote was very intellectual, but so beautiful too. Each section was fascinating and I found that even though I had technically heard some of the information before, I now see it in a new light after reading this book. I especially enjoyed the section talking about the Body of Christ...it really sheds light on our current society being isolated, which is not the way God intended the Body of Christ to be.

I highlighted two sections that really stuck out to me. The first is about the importance of the family:

"The most fundamental, the simplest, and the most effective form in which living faith becomes inspiring testimony will certainly always be found in the Christian family. The family reflects, as no other social institution does, the mystery of the Church, her real union with Christ, her Head (Eph. v, 32). The family illustrates, as it is illustrated nowhere else, the priesthood of the laity and shows it in all its beauty. For bride and bridegroom, in virtue of their priestly character, are themselves the ministers of the sacrament of their union, and, entering upon the life so consecrated, propagate in their children and children's children their own devout faith. The Christian family is the nucleus of the lay apostolate, of that faith which awakens and enkindles faith, which continually flames up anew and through whole generations gives testimony to Christ."

I'm sure part of the reason I loved this quote, and the whole section about marriage and family, so much is because that's my particular vocation. It really cements the saying that as the family goes, so goes the rest of the world.

The second section I highlighted is the following:

"Like St. Paul at Corinth, [the church] gives the "little ones in Christ" milk and not meat, for they "are not yet able" for meat. To those who are not yet delicate enough of hearing and perception to appreciate the profound spirituality and delicate inward power of the Christian message, and to understand the "liberty of the children of God," those who are not ready for St. Augustine's rule, "Love and do what you will," the Church in her sermons and instructions indicates the stern commandments of the Decalogue, insists upon the obligations of Christian morality and holds up the awful majesty of that Judge who condemns to everlasting fire all those who fail in mercy and in love. If love of God cannot achieve it, at least fear of His justice will deliver them from their earthliness and self-seeking and give them a spiritual life based on a fear of God which for all its imperfection is yet supernatural And when souls are alive to her voice and can understand her doctrine of inwardness and love, then she allures them by the sweetest methods, by the Mystery of the Tabernacle, by devotion to the Sacred Heart, by the Stations of the Cross and by her Rosary."

This holds particularly true to me in my own faith journey. We as humans become frustrated because we want all the answers RIGHT AWAY. But God in His wisdom does not give us that. He reveals to us certain truths and beauties of the Church as we are ready to receive them. We start as children (whether or not we are actually the age of a child), obeying because we must. Then, slowly, our sweet Lord chips away at our hardness of heart and offers us more and more of what the Church really is.

Great book: intense but worth it!!


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