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World & Current Events > Transition from civil service to private sector

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13062 comments It's probably not a secret, but state service of most officials end one day and they find themselves in the private sector after a long career in the state or municipal organs.
Police commissioners and their deputies may end up in private detective office, tax commissioners and other high profile dudes - in law and accountant's offices, politicians in lobbying firms, anti-trust dudes in law firms with relevant specializations and so on.
As you can imagine, they are often tasked to promote exactly the opposite from what they were doing for the state. Thus, an someone who fought monopolies in anti-trust would be asked to facilitate and secure monopolistic position of his/her new employer. The ex-tax dude would be working extra time to hone avoidance schemes. Politician would be lobbying for the agenda of his/her new employer among his former colleagues.
I hope ex-police don't end up retained by underworld syndicates and ex-military in the ranks of guerrilla.
I mean these guys have a unique knowledge and experience and where can they possibly go, if not to the same niche. However, ad hoc undoing of something they were spending careers to put in place may have a little flawed connotation.
What do you think?


message 2: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9197 comments I see no problem with an ex-tax man advising others how to legally reduce their tax bill. After all, we have to assume that if politicians decide that some sort of activity should not be taxed, then they are trying to encourage that activity. If they devise illegal evasion schemes, presumably they must expect prison.


message 3: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13062 comments Ian wrote: "After all, we have to assume that if politicians decide that some sort of activity should not be taxed, then they are trying to encourage that activity...."

For exemptions and obvious benefits no high end consultants are needed and every accountant should suffice. More often it's about loopholes and structuring corporate holdings through jurisdictions with low taxation and good tax treaties with the purpose to legally reduce taxation.
It's amusing though that one week a senior official is tasked with bringing home more taxes, while the next week - it's exactly the opposite...


message 4: by Faith (last edited May 26, 2017 05:29AM) (new)

Faith Jones (havingfaith) | 51 comments Have you seen the film Catch me if you can? Synopsis: "Frank Abagnale, Jr. (Leonardo DiCaprio) worked as a doctor, a lawyer and as a co-pilot for a major airline - all before his 18th birthday. A master of deception, he was also a brilliant forger, whose skill gave him his first real claim to fame: At the age of 17, Frank Abagnale, Jr. became the most successful bank robber in the history of the U.S." At the end of the story, he did exactly what you're describing but in reverse. Abagnale learned his skills as a fraudster and changed sides after he was punished to help the financial system stop fraud. The rotating door opens in two directions.


message 5: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13062 comments Faith wrote: "Have you seen the film Catch me if you can? ..... Abagnale learned his skills as a fraudster and changed sides after he was punished to help the financial system stop fraud. The rotating door opens in two directions."

Yeah, I remember it - a cool movie. Not sure, I'm a big fan of implications pertaining to the rotating doors. Abagnale is an excellent positive example and it's great when a con artist or another former criminal ends up being on the right side, however not sure how many are convinced to employ their skills towards something decent.

I don't know which allegations are true and factual and if it's a 'rotating doors' example, but some Mujaheddin groups might've enjoyed Western backing when they fought USSR in Afghanistan, only to turn their arms against the West some years later...


message 6: by Faith (new)

Faith Jones (havingfaith) | 51 comments Nik wrote "Mujaheddin groups might've enjoyed Western backing when they fought USSR in Afghanistan, only to turn their arms against the West some years later..."
Playing devil's advocate for a moment, they would say they've always been on the same side, i.e. opposing foreign interference in their country. The thing that's changed is the invader. They've been consistent.


message 7: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13062 comments Faith wrote: "They've been consistent. .."

They probably have some rationale they follow, cruel and wicked as it may be. Consistency may mean that a snake is always a snake, although Leo successfully refuted that.

The transition though often requires from people to become human chameleons undoing things they were doing when in the office and vice versa..


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