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Technique and Pattern Books > New Knitting Books

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message 1: by Anne Hawn (new)

Anne Hawn Smith (hawnsmith) | 17 comments I stumbled on this group when I was looking for a recommendation for a custom sock book. I found a book called Custom Socks, but I was afraid it was just a book for the feet and not the legs. I am very short and so many socks don't curve outward on the legs. I took a chance and the book came today. It is exactly what I was looking for. It has measurements for just about any place on a foot, ankle or leg you can find with a great section of why socks bag and fall down. It's so simple. If you are short and your calf comes quickly there is a lot of difference between the size around the ankle and the standard leg measurement. Unless you just have ribbing, the width at the ankle is too big, so the top of the sock just wants to drift down there too.

Anyway, I thought I'd open up the topic and see if anyone else has found new knitting books that they have found very helpful. It is so hard to just look at a site like Amazon and figure out if the book is what you need. I will call up the book in Ravelry and look at the patterns, but there is very little to tell about the techniques used and the amount of instruction.


message 2: by Msgadget (new)

Msgadget Thanks for starting this topic, Anne! I'm currently struggling with finding a shawl design book. Julia Riede's shawl books come up in Amazon searches but reviews there are mixed and relatively few project notes exist for her patterns on Ravelry. (Unfortunately, in 2017 a designer has to have a social media presence to be successful)

Besides Elizabeth Zimmerman's pi shawl - which I have not yet tackled - I've found help for the most basic designs in (surprisingly!) Knitting for Dummies and the book, Traditional Knitted Lace Shawls by Martha Waterman. I get the basics but want to know how to use short rows and other techniques to change the shape or direction of the stitches.

For now my answer is, I'm still looking for that new shawl design book!


message 3: by Anne Hawn (new)

Anne Hawn Smith (hawnsmith) | 17 comments That is a really good suggestion for an "anchor" book. I will look through some of mine and see what I can come up with. I know I have been looking for a book with more "theory" than just patterns to follow.

Hopefully, others will have some suggestions. There was a class online where you made tiny shawl examples which showed you how to make different styles.


message 4: by Msgadget (last edited May 31, 2017 09:49AM) (new)

Msgadget Thanks, Anne. Last night I found Crazy Lace: An Artistic Approach to Creative Lace Knitting by Myra Wood in Kindle Unlimited.

This ebook version has no hyperlinks or even a table of contents but it's relatively short and the second part promises to review basic shapes and how to incorporate lace patterns within them. I'll let you know if it lives up to that promise.


message 5: by Anne Hawn (new)

Anne Hawn Smith (hawnsmith) | 17 comments Great! I just found my Knitting Counterpanes: Traditional Coverlet Patterns for Contemporary Knitters Mary Walker Phillips and wrote a review of the book in Goodreads. I'll repeat it here so the reviews are in one place.

This is a great book with numerous patterns for the old-fashioned knitted bedspreads. Most are designed to be made with tiny needles and bedspread cotton. Some are knitted in one piece, but most are knitted with motifs, usually circular or square which are sewn together. The book has lots of information for the stitches, edgings and technical aspects of construction. Although the book is a collection of patterns from the 1800s they are just as beautiful today as when they were made.

Mary Walker Phillips has long been known as an expert in traditional knitting and the book reflects that. I am using the book for a project that a group in Ravelry, which I belong to, is starting. In many cases, we will just be making a pillow, but I am eager to do a full counterpane.


message 6: by Msgadget (new)

Msgadget Anne, you're a wonder! I'm taking Knitting Counterpanes... off the shelf to review. I have the original edition so I'm not sure if there's anything exciting and new in the newer, updated edition. I will dip into this evening for sure.

Thank you so much.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 153 comments I have a terrific sweater book, Ann Budd's The Knitter's Handy Book of Sweater Patterns. The Knitting Answer Book: Solutions to Every Problem You'll Ever Face; Answers to Every Question You'll Ever Ask (Answer Book is also much recommended.

Reading Power Cables: The Ultimate Guide to Knitting Inventive Cables was very interesting, as it's an entirely new approach to thinking about how cabling works.


message 8: by Anne Hawn (new)

Anne Hawn Smith (hawnsmith) | 17 comments Msgadget wrote: "Anne, you're a wonder! I'm taking Knitting Counterpanes... off the shelf to review. I have the original edition so I'm not sure if there's anything exciting and new in the newer, updated edition. I..."

I'm eager to hear what you think of it.


message 9: by Anne Hawn (last edited Jun 02, 2017 10:06PM) (new)

Anne Hawn Smith (hawnsmith) | 17 comments I love Power Cables. I learned so much from that book. It is really interesting. I also just got the Norah Gaughan book on cables I highly recommend it. In the back she has some patterns and one uses the front of the sweater for one huge motif. It is really stunning.

Norah Gaughan's Knitted Cable Sourcebook: A Breakthrough Guide to Knitting with Cables and Designing Your Own It is great too. It is wonderful that these designers are writing books that help you develop your own designs. They used to almost always on patterns someone wrote and you adjusted.

I got this one too:6000+ Pullover Possibilities: Interchangeable Options for Custom Knitted Sweaters - Melissa Leapman

The 6000 pullover book is an expansion of the Ann Budd book with all sorts of shapes and necklines. You can take cable patterns from the books we've mentioned and then plot them on the sweater design.

All of the designs need to have swatching done, but I learned something from one of the Ravelry groups. If you are designing with cables the circumference of a hat is just about the same amount of stitches you cast on for the front or back of your sweater. You can use you cable swatch for a hat. If you need the yarn, you can unravel it or you can just keep the matching hat. I knit a lot of Arans and I sure wish I had known that a long time ago.


message 10: by Anne Hawn (new)

Anne Hawn Smith (hawnsmith) | 17 comments Susanna - Censored by GoodReads wrote: "I have a terrific sweater book, Ann Budd's The Knitter's Handy Book of Sweater Patterns. [book:The Knitting Answer Book: Solutions to Every Problem You'll Ever Face; Answers to Every Q..."

Those are great books. I am a librarian, so I have a lot of those books and they are books I go to again and again. I have made several from the Ann Budd book and didn't have any problems. I've also had to hit that Knitting Answers Book more times than I wanted to. It is excellent.


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