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Vincent Van Gogh

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message 1: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments "If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced." -Vincent Van Gogh




message 2: by [deleted user] (new)



"An artist needn't be a clergyman or a churchwarden, but he certainly must have a warm heart for his fellow men" ~Vincent Van Gogh

If I had to pick a painter to have a conversation with, one of them would definitely be Vincent Van Gogh.








message 3: by [deleted user] (new)



I just returned from a trip to Amsterdam where I went to the Van Gogh museum for the second time. It is easily one of the top museums I have ever been to. On Friday nights they have music, poetry, film...wine! I am always so moved by his life and his work. I continue to be interested in his dream to create a artist's refuge at the "yellow house." I wonder whatever became of this house?






message 4: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Mary wrote: "

I just returned from a trip to Amsterdam where I went to the Van Gogh museum for the second time. It is easily one of the top museums I have ever been to. On Friday nights they have music, poetry..."


Welcome back, Mary! I'm jealous,someday I'll make it to Amsterdam and I must visit that museum (along with all the others in my dreams...)


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks Heather!! You will make it to Amsterdam, in the meantime.. THAT exhibit is online already. ;)

I still have a looong list of places and museums to hit myself!




message 6: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 20, 2009 02:02PM) (new)

In 1932, decades after Van Gogh's death, Paul Signac, a friend of Vincent's, visited the Arles and created the watercolour that became the final record of the Yellow House:



After Van Gogh, the house served different functions until it was damaged during a bombing raid by the Allies in 1944. After that the house was demolished.

And now you know... = )



message 7: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Thank you, Alex. I was wondering what happened to it! Now I feel more well informed.


message 8: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments "A work of art is a world in itself reflecting senses and emotions of the artist's world."
- Hans Hofmann


message 9: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 21, 2009 08:13AM) (new)



The Real Story Behind van Gogh's Severed Ear
Historians Now Claim That van Gogh Lost His Ear in a Fight With Fellow Artist Paul Gauguin
By CHRISTEL KUCHARZ

PASSAU, Germany, May 5, 2009

He's known as the tortured genius who cut off his own ear, but two German historians now claim that painter Vincent van Gogh lost his ear in a fight with his friend, the French artist Paul Gauguin.

The official version about van Gogh's legendary act of self-harm usually goes that the disturbed Dutch painter severed his left ear lobe with a razor blade in a fit of lunacy after he had a row with Gauguin one evening shortly before Christmas 1888.

Bleeding heavily, van Gogh then wrapped it in cloth, walked to a nearby bordello and presented the severed ear to a prostitute, who fainted when he handed it to her.

He then went home to sleep in a blood-drenched bed, where he almost bled to death, before police, alerted by the prostitute, found him the next morning.

He was unconscious and immediately taken to the local hospital, where he asked to see his friend Gauguin when he woke up, but Gauguin refused to see him.

A new book, published in Germany by Hamburg-based historians Hans Kaufmann and Rita Wildegans, argues that Vincent van Gogh may have made up the whole story to protect his friend Gauguin, a keen fencer, who actually lopped it off with a sword during a heated argument.

The historians say that the real version of events has never surfaced because the two men both kept a "pact of silence" - Gauguin to avoid prosecution and van Gogh in an effort trying to keep his friend with whom he was hopelessly infatuated.

Hans Kaufmann, one of the authors of the book "Pakt des Schweigens" - "Pact of Silence" in English - told ABC News that "the official version is largely based on Gauguin's accounts. It contains inconsistencies and there are plenty of hints by both artists that the truth is much more complex than the story we've all known."

"We carefully re-examined witness accounts and letters written by both artists and we came to the conclusion that van Gogh was terribly upset over Gauguin's plan to go back to Paris, after the two men had spent an unhappy stay together at the "Yellow House" in Arles, Southern France, which had been set up as a studio in the south."

"On the evening of December 23, 1888 van Gogh, seized by an attack of a metabolic disease, became very aggressive when Gauguin said he was leaving him for good. The men had a heated argument near the brothel and Vincent might have attacked his friend. Gauguin, wanting to defend himself and wanting to get rid of 'the madman' drew his weapon and made a move towards van Gogh and by that he cut off his left ear."

"We do not know for sure if the blow was an accident or a deliberate attempt to injure van Gogh, but it was dark and we suspect that Gauguin did not intend to hit his friend."

Gauguin left Arles the next day and the two men never saw each other again.

In the first letter that Vincent van Gogh wrote after the incident, he told Gauguin, "I will keep quiet about this and so will you." That apparently was the beginning of the "pact of silence."

Years later, Gauguin wrote a letter to another friend and in a reference about van Gogh he said, "A man with sealed lips, I cannot complain about him."

Kaufmann also cites correspondence between van Gogh and his brother Theo, in which the painter hints at what happened that night without directly breaking the "pact of silence" - he writes that "it is lucky Gauguin does not have a machine gun or other firearms, that he is stronger than him and that his 'passions' are stronger."

"There are plenty of hints in the documents we had at our disposal that prove the self-harm version is incorrect, but to the best of my knowledge, neither of the friends ever broke the pact of silence," says Kaufmann, who suggests that the story about van Gogh's ear needs to be re-written.

Vincent van Gogh, who painted The Starry Night, Sunflowers and the Potato Eaters but also a self-portrait with his bandaged ear to name but a few, died in 1890 from a self-inflicted gunshot wound at the age of 37. Gauguin died in 1903 at age 54.

Copyright © 2009 ABC News Internet Ventures


message 10: by Jim (new)

Jim | 147 comments Van Gogh is discussed often (sadly most of the time unfortunately about his bout with his demons) in EIFFEL'S TOWER which is about the Exposition of late 1880's in Paris
gave me a feel for the era and also has quite a bit about Whistler, Gaughan as well as Van Gogh


message 11: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 21, 2009 11:23AM) (new)

Jim! Good to see you here! I read Eiffel's Tower. Great Book. Ross King's book about Paris in those days is also quite interesting. Van Gogh has become the subject of much discussion. Like you, I think that people often focus on his demons more than in his art. On the other hand, I just returned from Amsterdam and I have to tell you that the Van Gogh Museum was one my best experiences there. Such great art! I have done much reading on the relationship between Van Gogh and Gauguin and I have concluded that Van Gogh was the superior of the two in matters of painting. I tend to think that Gauguin knew this but Van Gogh did not. Confidence and arrogance protected Gauguin while insecurity destroyed Van Gogh. Still, their collaboration was productive as much as it was difficult.


message 12: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 257 comments Hi everyone!

Thanks for starting this group, Alex.

Quick question: how do you upload an image? I spotted the perfect visual contribution to this thread on the street yesterday, but can't figure out how to post it.

Any thoughts would be much appreciated!
Jonathan


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

Jonathan, Heather started the group and I invited as many people as possible because I think is a great idea.

I only know how to post images already in the internet by using the following: [image error]

Hope all is well!


message 14: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 257 comments Thanks Alex,

And thanks Heather for starting the group!

I still can't figure out how to insert an image, but this link will take you to it: Van Gogh Movers

-Jonathan


message 15: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Jonathan wrote: "Thanks Alex,

And thanks Heather for starting the group!

I still can't figure out how to insert an image, but this link will take you to it: Van Gogh Movers

-Jonathan"


Your Welcome, Jonathan. I'm glad it has been successful with the help of Alex and others we can have some good discussions. I know my perceptions have been more enlightened as I've met highly intelligent and well informed individuals who have opened my mind to new understandings of various artists and their works. I hope you will enjoy this group as much as I have. So, WELCOME! Glad to have you! And Thank you for the link! I don't know how to insert images either, or links for that matter, so you are a 'cut above the rest' (me) in that respect! lol Have a great day.

Heather


message 16: by Valjeanne (new)

Valjeanne Jeffers | 2 comments Heather wrote: ""If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced." -Vincent Van Gogh

"


Genius! Absolute Genius!


message 17: by Valjeanne (new)

Valjeanne Jeffers | 2 comments One way I do it is by right clicking on my mouse & then saving the image to my computer (you need to have a computer that will automatically scan for viruses). Then you can go a social website that lets you upload the pic; like you would any other. Once it's uploaded the website will give you the option of emailing it or pasting the picture as a comment. Black Planet does this. I'm sure others do too. Hope this helps :)


message 18: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Valjeanne wrote: "One way I do it is by right clicking on my mouse & then saving the image to my computer (you need to have a computer that will automatically scan for viruses). Then you can go a social website that..."

Thank you! I will try that!


message 19: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 5 comments I love that quote by Van Gogh. We all have so many voices inside telling us what we can't do.


message 20: by M (new)

M (wwwgoodreadscomprofilem) Heather wrote: ""A work of art is a world in itself reflecting senses and emotions of the artist's world."
- Hans Hofmann"


Great quote, Heather ! The artist's world, with its own representations, its senses and emotions give us a way to understand the World.




message 21: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Lopez | 257 comments In the goodreads group "Constant Reader" someone posted news that I thought might be of interest here as well. Evidently there's an IMAX movie about Van Gogh that's been out for some time. I haven't seen it, but I'm fascinated by the idea:

http://www.filmvangogh.com/index2duk....


message 22: by Angela (new)

Angela | 2 comments This man influenced me in so many ways. I decided as a child to not become an artist because I thought it would make me go crazy like Van Gogh. Later, once I realized the full scope of things, I began painting again.


message 23: by Pollopicu (new)

Pollopicu Heather wrote: ""If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced." -Vincent Van Gogh

"


Amen! hallelujah




message 24: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Frederiksen (sarahfred101) I recently learned from one of my many art history books that Van Gogh's favorite color was yellow. If you look, nearly all of his paintings have a shade of vibrant yellow in them, I just found this little fact interesting and felt like sharing it :)


message 25: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Thanks, Sarah. That is interesting!


message 26: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Van Gogh's Family Tree

His dizzy aunt ---------------------------------------------------------- Verti Gogh


His brother who ate prunes---------------------------------------- Gotta Gogh


His brother who worked at a convenience store ------------- Stop N Gogh


His grandfather from Yugoslavia --------------------------------------- U Gogh


His cousin from Illinois ---------------------------------------------- Chica Gogh

His magician uncle ------------------------------------------- Where-diddy Gogh

His Mexican cousin --------------------------------------------------- A Mee Gogh

His Mexican cousin's American half-brother --------------------- Gring Gogh

His nephew who drove a stage coach ------------------------ Wells-far Gogh

His constipated uncle --------------------------------------------------- Can't Gogh

His ballroom dancing aunt ---------------------------------------------- Tang Gogh

His bird lover uncle ------------------------------------------------------ Flamin Gogh

His fruit loving cousin ------------------------------------------------------ Man Gogh

His aunt who taught positive thinking ----------------------------- Way-to-Gogh

His little bouncy nephew ---------------------------------------------------- Poe Gogh

His sister who loved disco --------------------------------------------------- Go Gogh

His niece who travels the country in an RV ------------------- Winnie Bay Gogh


Are you smiling yet? ---------------------------------------------------- There ya Gogh!


message 27: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1905 comments Gogh Heather!


message 28: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments lol, thanks Ruth!


message 29: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments deleted user wrote: "

The Real Story Behind van Gogh's Severed Ear
Historians Now Claim That van Gogh Lost His Ear in a Fight With Fellow Artist Paul Gauguin
By CHRISTEL KUCHARZ

PASSAU, Germany, May 5, 2009

..."



I do not buy this bunk that Gauguin lopped off Vincent's lobe. Vincent does not come close to mentioning in any of his letters, voluminous though they were.

To me, Gauguin was to Vincent what Salieri was to Mozart as depicted in Amadeus ... though it may not have been so in Mozart's case, it was true in Vincent's. His lack of self-worth put him in a secondary position to Gauguin, though to me he was the far superior painter. And I think Vincent could have stabbed Gauguin but instead chose to disfigure himself instead.

I have a chapter and a half or so about Vincent and Gauguin in my modern-day Van Gogh novel titled Van Gogh, Encore


message 30: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments Jonathan wrote: "In the goodreads group "Constant Reader" someone posted news that I thought might be of interest here as well. Evidently there's an IMAX movie about Van Gogh that's been out for some time. I haven'..."

The Imax movie about Van Gogh was incredible, btw. Saw it this past summer here in Raleigh, NC.


message 31: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments I don't even think we have an Imax theater here where I am, we don't seem to have much of anything, least of all art. But I would like to check that out sometime, is it available on Netflix or something?


message 32: by John (last edited Sep 29, 2010 05:22AM) (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments Hi Heather,

You got me wondering so I Googled up and yes, there are DVD and Blue-Ray versions of "Van Gogh: Brush with Genius" IMAX. Actually, there soon will be ... "This title will be released on November 2, 2010."

Here's the link for the DVD: http://amzn.to/c3rfBY
since I'll want to find it later. Maybe Santy Claus will bring me one!

Here's the YouTube trailer clip for the movie: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhlXd2...


message 33: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Wow, John. Thanks for posting those links! I'm going to order the DVD as soon as possible. I'm looking forward to seeing it. I enjoyed the trailer, it looks like it's going to be an incredible movie. Thank you again!


message 34: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments You're welcome, Heather. I look forward to reading your thoughts on the movie.


message 35: by John (last edited Oct 04, 2010 08:19PM) (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments Just listed two trade print copies of my Van Gogh, Encore as giveaways.

Van Gogh, Encore giveaway

Enter to win!


message 36: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Jun 23, 2011 09:05PM) (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Museum: Painting thought to be Vincent van Gogh self-portrait is actually of his brother Theo


The Washington Post
Associated Press

AMSTERDAM — The Van Gogh Museum said Tuesday its experts now believe one of Vincent van Gogh’s paintings previously thought to be a self-portrait actually depicts his brother, Theo.

If true, it would be the only known painting of Theo, although Vincent made several sketches of his brother, who supported him financially and was his lifelong confidant and friend.


“People have often thought it was funny that there were no portraits of Theo, given that they were so close,” said museum spokeswoman Linda Snoek.

She said the portrait was made in 1887 while the pair lived together in Paris — a lesser-known period of Van Gogh’s life, since the bulk of information about Vincent is derived from letters he sent to Theo.

The painting has long been in storage, but went on display at the museum in Amsterdam Tuesday as part of an exhibition on new findings about the painter’s time spent in Antwerp and Paris in 1885-1888.

Though the brothers resembled each other physically, scholars determined the painting represents Theo by a number of factors.

Head researcher Louis van Tilborgh compared two paintings from 1887 with similar-looking men in suits set against a blue background.

“They are two small, detailed portraits that when you see them you think: they belong together,” Van Tilborgh said in an interview with Dutch state broadcaster NOS.

The portrait of Theo shows he had rounder ears than Vincent did. The other portrait shows Vincent with long, angular ears, consistent with other artists’ paintings of Vincent. That’s before he famously self-mutilated one of his ears in December 1888.

In addition, Theo’s goatee is more yellow-brown than Vincent’s dark red beard, and Theo has shaven cheeks, consistent with photographs of him from the same period, while Vincent painted himself sporting mutton-chop sideburns.

In other discoveries, the museum said the bird depicted in the 1887 painting previously known as “Wheatfield with a Lark” is actually a partridge.

Van Gogh, who suffered from depression and mental anguish much of his life, shot himself in a wheatfield in 1890 and died shortly thereafter.

[image error]
In this photo released by the The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands on Tuesday, June 21, 2011, shows a painting by Vincent van Gogh which the museum previously believed to a self-portrait but actually depicts his brother, Theo.


message 37: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Interesting, thought all this time it was the artist. Oh well.


message 38: by Aloha (new)

Aloha | 163 comments Funny. But I've always had an inkling that it did not have the feel of Vincent himself. The man was too rational looking. Now, this confirmed my instinct.


message 39: by Robin (last edited Jun 24, 2011 12:45PM) (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Aloha, that is an astute observation. There must be a Van Gogh self-portrait, the one with the bandage on his ear. Must be Vincent.


message 40: by John (last edited Jun 25, 2011 03:19PM) (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments It is interesting. Hair color can change with the amount of time spent in the sun, but the shape of the ears obviously remains constant unless altered by a knife if a fit of desperation.

Have to wonder why Vincent would not refer to the painting as that of a portrait of Theo. He describes a great many works in his letters. I just don't see the rationale ...


message 41: by Annalisa (last edited Jun 25, 2011 03:28PM) (new)

Annalisa (annalisameisel) i'm a big vincent vango fan i love his sunflower and iris paintings the best


message 42: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) John that was what I was thinking. On that one it states that it is a self-portrait, so I dunno...


message 43: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments Robin, yes ... strange for a man who readily revealed highly personal aspects of his life -- even his suicide -- yet for this he chose to be mysterious? It's not like he was protecting Theo's identity or anything. I will see if @vangoghmuseum is willing to respond to a tweet on the matter. They have been accommodating in the past.


message 44: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments That's a good idea, John. Let us know what you find out...


message 45: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Yes, tell us what you find out.


message 46: by John (last edited Jun 27, 2011 05:54AM) (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments The Van Gogh Museum folks were quick with a couple answers, see below for the Twitter conversation:

@JohnAKarr John A. Karr

@vangoghmuseum At Goodreads we are wondering why Vincent would label the portrait(s) of Theo as Self Portraits.


@vangoghmuseum Van Gogh Museum

@JohnAKarr Van Gogh's paintings got their title after he died, based on descriptions in his letters, or by the depicted image. (1/2)

@JohnAKarr (2/2) Van Gogh lived with his brother in Paris 1887. So there's little correspondence between them about these Paris paintings


message 47: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/ar...



Van Gogh’s 1887 Self-Portrait, on loan from the Van Gogh Museum to the Dulwich Picture Gallery as its Masterpiece of the Month for August – and celebrating the gallery’s 200th anniversary – was painted when Seurat’s influence was at its height. In it Van Gogh borrows from the pointillist method of using dots of colour to create the effect of shimmering light. But instead of dots he uses straight brushstrokes, and instead of pure colour he lays one on top of another. The radiating circle of dark blue, grey and brown strokes frames Vincent’s head, pushing it closer to the picture plane and rendering his orange -red beard all the more vivid.

It used to be said that the vibrating colour in pictures like this were indications of Van Gogh’s approaching madness. Yet a less mad picture would be hard to find. He is neatly dressed in a cravat, coat and felt hat and looks out at us with an intense, intelligent, piercing gaze.



message 48: by Connie (new)

Connie G (connie_g) | 368 comments Thanks for this example of Van Gogh's creativity.


message 49: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments A lot if nice information about Van Gogh, some I already know and some which are new to me, like the naming of the paintings. I also wondered first why there's only one known painting of Theo, since he was his lifelong supporter and friend. It's Theo who suggested that that Vincent should take up art. Theo was weak and unable to come to terms with Vincent's absence, he died six months later. May be he never wanted to paint his brother because he always had the picture of him in his mind and his heart. Just a thought.

They were buried together. The graves:




message 50: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Thank you for posting that picture above, Amalie! Even seeing the graves overwhelms me with sorrow for the life he lived, that tortured existence for him. He was and is real, his life was real. Not that I ever doubted or thought to the contrary, but seeing where he was ultimately laid to rest is very sobering.


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