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Do You Have a Dream Workbook: 5 Keys to Realize Your Dream
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Grace Blair (grace_mystic) | 23 comments The Book Pirates of Amazon
By: Grace Allison, Author
Imagine you give birth to a story that comes from the deepest part of yourself. The place where divine creativity resides. As a new parent your baby cries in the middle of the night as your characters keep you up while staring at the ceiling or show up in your dreams. The birthing process of your new creation could take more time than giving birth to an elephant. What keeps you going is the passion of your idea and how you just know people are waiting for your new book.
To make sure your child looks good, you create a jaw-dropping cover and have the story edited by professionals. And to protect your creation you have taken care to have your work copyrighted and registered at the Library of Congress.
Then comes the christening day when your bright, shiny newly minted child is published and comes out into the world. Where do you present your new work to the world? Well, on-line of course.
Most authors sell their books on Amazon.com because it is the biggest on-line bookstore. The behemoth of books provides an extensive inventory of books ranging from bargain books, children's books, textbooks and digital books. Good for the book buyer however not so good for authors.
The Independent Book Sellers Association sent out an announcement recently, “If you are an Ingram, Create Space or any other print on demand service, Amazon is pushing down your “buy button” to the bottom of the “order the book” options list.
On March 1, 2017 Amazon enacted a policy that allows third-party sellers to compete for the Buy Box for books in new condition. Where books are concerned, the Default Buy Box has always belonged to publisher. When you buy a book, Amazon would pay the publisher 45% of the list price. This means your purchase is supporting the entity that published the book, namely the publisher, and authors are making a profit (albiet small) every time you buy because the publisher is paying an author a royalty on each sale.
Now Amazon is giving that priority spot to third-party sellers, relegating the publisher button to a far less favorable positon, below the landing page screen line, often last in a list of third-party sellers offering the book for a significantly lower cost in addition to free shipping.
The Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA) believes Amazon’s policy change, allowing third-party sellers to compete for the Buy Box for books in “new condition,” hurts authors and publishers. Here’s why:

• Amazon, once again, is attempting to drive down the value of books, and therefore
intellectual property and creative work in general. Under the new policy, Amazon is
rewarding the seller that conforms to its rules (“competitive pricing”) by granting them the coveted Buy Box. Often this means dropping the publisher listing, and it’s not unlikely that publisher listings may fall off the buy page completely—at Amazon’s discretion.
• When a book is not obviously for sale by its publisher on Amazon, the author may not be making royalties. Although for now, it seems that publisher listings are on Amazon, it takes a savvy consumer to even understand what they’re buying—and most will go for the lowest cost item, especially if it’s in the coveted Buy Box position.

In all cases, the books sold on Amazon would not qualify as sales for the purposes of author royalties because they’ve already been sold or originally existed as promotional
copies. And even for those third-party sellers buying books through wholesale channels, the question arises of how Amazon is measuring “new condition.”

If consumers don’t see the option to buy new, from the publisher, then Amazon is promoting piracy. Authors get nothing from used books because the consumer is buying something that’s already been bought and tracked as a sale. If this new policy takes hold for most backlist books, authors’ and publishers’ revenue will dry up, and more and more books are at risk of going out of print more quickly. Publishers will not be able to afford to keep books in print that are not selling on Amazon. So, this policy is essentially driving books to an earlier death—and thereby hurting authors.
Amazon suggests that one of the ways you can win the Buy Box is to keep books “in stock.”
This poses a major problem for self-published authors and any backlist author whose books are print-on-demand. Print-on-demand automatically means there’s no stock. The books are printed to order. If Amazon is penalizing books that are set up as POD titles and favoring third-party sellers who have stock due to any of the abovementioned means of procurement, authors will again be dinged when their own listing, or publisher listing, ranks low on the list of “Other Sellers on Amazon.” We can only suppose that Amazon will not penalize or remove books that are listed with CreateSpace—and as Amazon moves away from CreateSpace to consolidate its print and e-book self-publishing program onto Kindle, it will be interesting to note how often those books get the coveted Buy Box position for doing business with Amazon.

If indie publishers can’t get into bookstores and are being cut off at the knees by Amazon induced piracy, then the future is grim indeed. As a community of indie publishers, we should be very bothered by this new policy. Amazon is a mammoth player in the publishing space and it can do much to either help or hurt the publishing industry. Their new third party seller policy is potentially terrorizing, in that it is likely to result in publishers selling fewer copies and ultimately being forced to declare backlist books out of print.

My book, “Do You Have a Dream Workbook 5 Keys to Realize Your Dream” went on sale last week for $9.95. Today there are five third-party booksellers listed with a low price of $7.32. Where did they get the books to sell? I have not seen a sale to them. Maybe they are selling at a low cost to get you into their bookstore. All I know is that I will not see one penny from this book pirate. My hard work and money invested in raising my child has ripped from me, stolen. Now, what can an indie author like me do when they sell on Amazon?


Grace is a successful award-winning author, modern Christian mystic, wellness consultant, business development advisor, marketing coach and workshop facilitator. She has faced many life challenges, including a life-threatening disease, and used what she encountered as a stimulus to gain greater happiness and fulfillment. She lives in Lubbock, Texas, with her husband John Blair, and maintains a private health and success coaching practice.

Do You Have a Dream Workbook? 5 Keys to Realize Your Dream
by Ms. Grace Allison
Link: http://a.co/4muIa83

Grace Allison
4408 14 Street
Lubbock, Texas 79416
806-543-3308

email: grace@modernmysticmedia.com

website: www.gracethemystic.com


message 2: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 2163 comments I'm kind of effy on Book Pirating. Yes I'd be mad if I found out my book was on a site I didn't authorize but at the same time I'm not worried. If you don't know about it then you shouldn't worry but the bigger reason not to worry is because most book pirating sites list your book at a ridiculous price or they don't sell anyways. If I can barely sell my books I doubt book pirates can do any better.


Grace Blair (grace_mystic) | 23 comments Justin wrote: "I'm kind of effy on Book Pirating. Yes I'd be mad if I found out my book was on a site I didn't authorize but at the same time I'm not worried. If you don't know about it then you shouldn't worry b..."

Thanks Justin for your reply. Good luck with your book.


message 4: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 491 comments Is your print on Createspace? Is it on extended distribution? Maybe they have a deal with Createspace and get them cheaper? I sincerely doubt they'll print their own. Amazon is too strict on laws and policy. They wouldn't allow it.


message 5: by Mellie (last edited Jun 13, 2017 05:40PM) (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 543 comments The article is somewhat misleading. This is only an issue with big publishers who do large print runs. Unsold books are then disposed of at minimal cost, which is often where resellers are unable to undercut the listed price.

This is not an issue for the majority of indies using POD, where each copy is printed as it is sold.

Also you are not seeing "book pirates". Check your POD dashboard, you probably have expanded distribution enabled which means any store can access a copy to sell. Yes there are often other stores offering "new or used" copies of indie POD books but they don't actually hold a copy. There's no point in getting upset at how they are undercutting you or pirating your book - they're not. The other stores don't have your book (unless you had a large print run that got trashed) and will still have to order from the POD publisher as they sell a copy. The discounted price comes from the reseller's cut, not the author's royalty.


Grace Blair (grace_mystic) | 23 comments My book is on Create Space without extended distribution. I make more royalties around $2.30. I have my book on Ingram where I get extended distribution. The downside is that any on-line bookstore can purchase my book from Ingram and I receive a royalty of $.69. Amazon is allowing third party sellers to undercut my Amazon Create Space book. The third party sellers can sell my book, a dress, toothpaste and any other product Amazon has in its Marketplace. Therefore anyone can be a third party seller and make money. Go to their website and research the Marketplace. Amazon makes 40% of its business in the Marketplace. So books are just another item in the warehouse of Amazon.


message 7: by Miss M (new)

Miss M | 31 comments "So books are just another item in the warehouse of Amazon."
Yes, yes they are. Amazon is treating books exactly the same as all the other products they sell, where sellers compete for the buy box. Why shouldn't they?
As I understand it, you, the (self) publisher, set your own price on Ingram, so set one where you make a decent profit.

"Therefore anyone can be a third party seller and make money."
Absolutely. It's the American way, and quite legal.


Grace Blair (grace_mystic) | 23 comments Yes I have set up my own bookstore. I can sell any book that Ingram has in its inventory. I send buyers to my new bookstore.
https://aerbook.com/store/ModernMysti...

I can make money on all the books I can sell. The bookstore is free to any Ingram author less the fees for shipping and tax


message 9: by Mellie (last edited Jun 13, 2017 06:57PM) (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 543 comments Grace wrote: "Amazon is allowing third party sellers to undercut my Amazon Create Space book.."

If you don't like it, then do something about it.

Uncheck expanded distribution and your book won't be available to third party resellers. Bang. Problem solved.

Or increase the list price, so even if they do discount it, you still make the same amount (which is what I do). Monitor the wholesale discount you are offering on Ingrams. Or make your paperback available through Amazon's KDP dashboard so their distributed title will always have precedence over the third party listings.

I guess I'm missing something, but I don't understand authors who complain about Amazon practices or spread false information by using inflammatory words like "piracy". It's not, its a normal business practice. You are a supplier to Amazon, not a customer and it's not compulsory to sell your books there. If you think you have a more economically viable way to sell your books then change your practices.


Grace Blair (grace_mystic) | 23 comments Have you ever written a book? Given birth to a work of art after years of sacrifice to your divine creation? There was a time when Amazon kept books separate from their Marketplace. Authors could depend on a little income from their years of sacrifice. But commerce rules art now. The coffers of the pirates of Amazon are treating us like abandon slaves. We give them art, and they grind their heal into our work. I am taking my art to my own bookstore and elsewhere like indie bookstores. Most of my friends have seen their income cut in half from the new third party policy. Hopefully they too will change the way they sell their books. Will someone please turn the light out when the last book is closed.


message 11: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 491 comments Most Indies sell more eBooks than prints. I say a sale is a sale. If it gets the book into the hands of someone who will read it well go for it Amazon. The little royalty I will get will be better than none. Because if I don't sell, I don't get any anyways. And people might not even look at it at my regular price while the other might tempt them. If they sell my books, they are doing some kind of marketing that works. All I can say to that is THANK YOU sellers. :P


message 12: by Mellie (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 543 comments Grace wrote: "The coffers of the pirates of Amazon are treating us like abandon slaves. "

No, they are not pirates they are legitimate third party resellers. Why do you insist on using false terms? Your book is not being pirated. It's being sold by other book sellers. If you don't like it, uncheck expanded distribution on your dashboard so its no longer an issue.

I find it odd that you would rather complain on Goodreads and throw around emotive language than actually do something to fix the issue.

I agree with G.G. - THANK YOU sellers :)


message 13: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 491 comments Grace wrote: "Have you ever written a book? Given birth to a work of art after years of sacrifice to your divine creation? There was a time when Amazon kept books separate from their Marketplace. Authors could d..."

While I love my books, I wouldn't go as far as calling them 'divine creation'. That'd be a little pretentious.

Maybe I am naïve, but I'm not afraid the last book will ever be closed.


message 14: by Mellie (last edited Jun 13, 2017 09:21PM) (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 543 comments Grace wrote: "Have you ever written a book? Given birth to a work of art after years of sacrifice to your divine creation?"

I assumed this was a joke.

If you're giving birth to divine creations then Amazon is not the right marketplace. You probably need one with donkeys...


message 15: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 2163 comments I apologize for letting out a can of worms or opening up Pandoras box if you will..I was simply giving my thoughts on the subject matter at hand.


Grace Blair (grace_mystic) | 23 comments Thank you for your point of view. Hope you have an inspired day. Do You Have a Dream Workbook 5 Keys to Realize Your Dream by Grace Allison
Check out my book.


message 17: by Ben (new)

Ben Jackson | 44 comments This is interesting, but not necessarily news worthy. Like people said, adjust your sale channels, monitor your distribution.

This entire post seems a lot more like a shameless plug to get people to buy or download your book. I'd would have paid a lot more attention if you didn't mention your book 2-3 times throughout the thread.


Grace Blair (grace_mystic) | 23 comments Thank you Ben for your comment. But I don't see how I could have made my point of Amazon's policy change without my book.
Have a nice day.


message 19: by Howie (new)

Howie Erickson | 1 comments Sounds like a great idea

My author page>


message 20: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 491 comments I agree with Ben. It sounds like a shameless plug to me.

All those books shoved in our faces without any good reasons are not helping your cause. Down talking about Amazon won't make your books sound more appealing. In fact, it has quite the opposite effect. :/


message 21: by Andy (new)

Andy Crossfield | 6 comments Grace, your point seems to be about money and how Amazon has changed the playing field authors play on. So let me say I've made more money by far owning Amazon stock than in royalties. And if it is noteriety, I've gotten more people to read my book excerpts online than I ever could do by holding events in person. But let me give you an analogy. Let's say you're a farmer. You use the river to transport your crops to the village where you sell them. But it's rainy season and the river is wild and unnavigable.You could stand on the banks and shake your fist and tell yourself how unfair it is... or you could open your fields and allow the waters to deposit silt to enrich your land. Your choice. I think you know mine- Amazon is far superior to schlepping your books here and there, and if it's just about the money, buy the stock. Grace wrote: "The Book Pirates of Amazon
By: Grace Allison, Author
Imagine you give birth to a story that comes from the deepest part of yourself. The place where divine creativity resides. As a new parent your ..."



Grace Blair (grace_mystic) | 23 comments Thanks Andy I wonder when you started investing in Amazon. I have Amazon stock too it is part of our investment portfolio held by TIAA -CREF where we have share in many of the top companies on the stock exchange.
Thanks for your comment. Have a nice day.

grace


message 23: by Andy (new)

Andy Crossfield | 6 comments Glad to hear you're a fellow shareholder. All in all, as authors, we would be worse without them. All the best,
Andy


message 24: by Rory (new)

Rory | 104 comments Thanks all for a spirited discussion. :o)


Grace Blair (grace_mystic) | 23 comments Your welcome Rory. Have an inspired day. Do You Have a Dream Workbook 5 Keys to Realize Your Dream by Grace Allison


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