murdeREADos discussion

Female Serial Killers: How and Why Women Become Monsters
This topic is about Female Serial Killers
42 views
Female Serial Killers - June 2017

Comments Showing 1-12 of 12 (12 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Jenny | 14 comments Mod
June's book is "Female Serial Killers" by Peter Vronsky. Enjoy!


message 2: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (shelfhabit) Great pick!
Just a question—are books in this group all going to be non-fiction? Or will we read some murdery fiction books together?


Jenny | 14 comments Mod
I have no idea. You could message Jazzi in the Facebook group and ask.


Jenny | 14 comments Mod
I have to say, I'm only 20% in but I'm really fascinated with the physical genetic markers that serial killers tend to have in common, like bulbous fingers and thin, unruly hair. I wonder what other physical characteristics might eventually be discovered to align with emotional ones.


Devan (deeveepee) | 1 comments You know, as interesting as all the women we read about were, I kinda got the idea that this guy does not care for women. Reading a book about women written by a man makes the mood a little more difficult, but I'm still glad I read this.


message 6: by Laurean (new) - added it

Laurean (ConceptualAlice) | 3 comments Still struggling a bit with this book. I don't know why I can't get into it. But I think Devan raises a very good point too.

Trying to blast through it in the next day or so, I'll have more full thoughts then.


message 7: by Alyssa (new)

Alyssa Gray (lycanthropologies) when i first read the book a few years ago, i was ALL about it, but i think that's because i was focusing mostly on the stories of the killers and not about anything else that was written. reading it a second time, i was more aware of the gender discrepancies and some of the language that was used. i didn't really care for the way he spoke of feminism but at the same time i thought a lot of the things the feminist writers were saying about ppl--like aileen specifically--was bs. i changed my former rating to a 4 from a 5, but if we could do halves i'd probably give it a 3.5 or so. the stories were fascinating, but the subtext wasn't great. i really do recommend his other book, though, even though it's primarily about men. the psychology is really interesting.


Alex Lawless (aglawless) I had a really great discussion on the FB page about this book and how dismissive the author is. I think the only reason I finished the book is because it is a one of a kind collection of female serial killers, and he does provide their childhood/leading up to their crime stories, which I am all about. But on the other hand, he confuses his facts with ill-thought out writing, makes some pretty gross comments about women/victims, and his personal opinion and "writing flair" are all too much for me to really like it. And yeah, while I don't personally believe in the feminist view points he brings up (specifically with Wuornos) he is just SO dismissive of feminism as a whole from there on and is practically incredulous when he finds himself agreeing with something he has determined a feminist view point towards the end of the book.
I'm glad I read it solely because I was completely unaware of most of the perpetrators' childhoods and their lives during the period in which they committed their crimes. But I don't think he's a particularly good writer. I think he's treatment of everyone, regardless of victim or perpetrator or women in general, really just skeezed me out most of the time and it kind of ruined it.


message 9: by Alyssa (new)

Alyssa Gray (lycanthropologies) yeah, i agree. it's one of those things that i read when i was younger, and hadn't learn quite as much about the world and myself, so i was either unaware, ignorant, or actively in denial about a lot of it when reading the first time. now it's up to one of us to write a female's perspective on female killers.


message 10: by Alex (new) - rated it 3 stars

Alex Lawless (aglawless) Alyssa wrote: "yeah, i agree. it's one of those things that i read when i was younger, and hadn't learn quite as much about the world and myself, so i was either unaware, ignorant, or actively in denial about a l..."

Oh hard same, I understand exactly.


Jenny | 14 comments Mod
Alyssa wrote: "yeah, i agree. it's one of those things that i read when i was younger, and hadn't learn quite as much about the world and myself, so i was either unaware, ignorant, or actively in denial about a l..."

Get on it, Murderinos!


Rachel | 4 comments That summarizes it perfectly! I'm about 3/4 finished and find the author's language and attitude toward women (especially Aileen) distracting at best.


back to top