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Assassin's Fate (The Fitz and the Fool, #3)
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Book 16 - Assassin's Fate > Book 16 -Assassin's Fate Chp 43-Ending (FULL Spoilers)

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Mark Halse | 26 comments A stone skill dragon! I should have seen this coming! Fitz only said he planned to make his own dragon a few million times...

No matter how well it fits I still wanted Fitz to go home and live with poor Bee.


Alfred Haplo (alfredhaplo) | 550 comments I'm kind of glad it wasn't a sexier way to end. Just plain ole' melt into stone. A nice way to circle back to the last line of Assassin's Apprentice.

Oh, and the thought of Fitz riddled with crawly maggot-y thingies gave me the heebies jeebies.

I am not clear about this - just what exactly was Bee's "strategy" at the end? Was it to feed her memories into the stone to help Fitz materialize the wolf, or was it something more devious than that? As in trying to get Fool to join her father?

I have loads of questions but not sure if they really matter anymore...


Mark Halse | 26 comments I think Bee was actually trying to give all of herself to the stone wolf like the Fool ended up. I also relished that she hated the Fool so much because I hated about 90% of the time. He was mostly so douchy. Mostly.


Silvana (silvaubrey) Yeap, The Fool has been excruciatingly annoying in this book I'm glad he won't become Bee's (self-appointed) guardian.

If I were Bee, I'll just runaway if he forces that and read my dream journals without my permission.


message 5: by Alfred (last edited May 25, 2017 03:34PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Alfred Haplo (alfredhaplo) | 550 comments His gaze lingered on me the last. His eyes were both hard and amused. "Those were astounding lies, cub. And the very last one the most inspired of all. You have your father’s talent for it."

Alright, just one more question. From your reading, who do you think said this (Fitz or Fool) and what was the "last lie" referenced?

Initially, I thought Fool said this since he was the last person to talk to Bee. On reading again, this sounds like Fitz.

I thought "last lie" was in reference to the false letter, but it could also refer to Bee lying about Fitz loving Fool the most to trick Fool into giving himself to the stone wolf. Without Fool, the wolf would be mired unrealized.

Although, thinking further, the lie was more likely in reference to the false letter given context of preceding paragraphs and that darn phrase repeated for the 5th time (!). Surely the whole point for repeating this phrase is so it can be applied at this culmination of the story. "‘Don’t do what you can’t undo, until you’ve considered what you can’t do once you’ve done it.’

This is Bee's chance to "undo" the lie and tell Fool the truth about Fitz's feelings so that Fool can now join Fitz without hesitation. If she does not "undo" the lie, then Fitz forever stays mired. Also, recall Bee's dreams in 6 different ways at the end of her days, and clearly she dreamt of a mired stone wolf with her "old grey father" (Fool) standing next to it and dark days are ahead (i.e. no Wolf of West to rise to the rescue of the Seven Duchies in the future).

Am I making sense? Haha, clearly I need to chill.


Silvana (silvaubrey) I'm a bit confused but I still think the lie is the false letter.


Linnea | 16 comments I feel like it was Nighteyes talking to her, but of course now they are all one being, so I don't think you can really say which one it was. I think the last lie was that she said Fitz loves Fool the most.


Alfred Haplo (alfredhaplo) | 550 comments Linnea wrote: "I think the last lie was that she said Fitz loves Fool the most."

It would seem that, certainly. Though it feels counter-intuitive for that to be a lie. I mean, F/F's big love is a thread throughout the series, so it's not actually a lie that Fitz indeed loved Fool the most. His actions often confirmed that.

But I think we have to zoom out to consider the preceding and subsequent paragraphs. Nettle gasped on hearing "the truth". That "do and undo" phrase has been repeated 5 times throughout the story, so there must be a point to it.

All Bee needed to say was something along the lines of, "I lied about Fitz not wanting you back in the letter." That itself would have galvanized Fool to act. Fool would not need to hear "he loves you the most" to act because that implies Fool would only act if he was loved above all others. No, he only needed to know that he was loved, not rejected, by Fitz as claimed in the false letter.

And yes! You're right, it was likely Nighteyes.


Suzanne My interpretation was that Bee knew her father needed the Fool to go with him into the statue, and she couldn't figure out why the Fool was not offering to do so. When the Fool mentioned the letter, etc. that Bea had told him about, she understood that he felt rejected by Fitz. So she told him that she'd lied about the letter and that Fitz loved him best. Anyway, I think the "last lie" was that - she didn't really lie about the letter - Fitz really wrote it.


Alfred Haplo (alfredhaplo) | 550 comments That Fitz actually wrote the letter is an interesting perspective, but it doesn't seem likely. This was during the voyage on Vivacia - Bee was mad at Fool for keeping secrets, and so she, "I struck back". Then she proceeded to describe this false letter and thought "My father would not have been pleased with me. I knew I should apologize and admit my falsehood. Even if I didn’t mean it?" This seems to point towards a fabrication.


Suzanne Oh yes- I totally forgot about the "apologize and admit my falsehood" line - thanks! It certainly does point to the letter being a lie.


message 12: by Linnea (last edited May 26, 2017 03:43AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Linnea | 16 comments Alfred wrote: "Linnea wrote: "I think the last lie was that she said Fitz loves Fool the most."

It would seem that, certainly. Though it feels counter-intuitive for that to be a lie. I mean, F/F's big love is a ..."


I think that explaining to Fool that the letter was a lie was her gift to him or her way of not doing something she can't undo. Bee saying Fool was loved the most was something else. I don't think she was saying it to comfort the Fool. I think she was upset and felt that Fool had stolen Fitz from her and she needed to voice her fear of not being loved.


Monique (bounceswoosh) | 4 comments Hi, first post! Um - I just want to say that I had a stomach bug while reading the last 30% or so. I would have been bothered by the parasites regardless, but OMG reading it while my gut was cramping every few minutes made his prolonged death especially awful. Of course I developed psychosomatic itching, too. Unless ... maybe I AM dying of parasites? *shudder*

I'm still a bit annoyed because the "Traitor's Death" thing was clearly designed as something that couldn't be healed with the Skill, but honestly, with everything that has happened throughout all the books in this universe, it was hard to take that limitation seriously. It just felt like "Robin Hobb decided Fitz needed to enter a stone dragon to end his story, so she made up something to make it happen." To be fair, though, I can't think of ANY prolonged terminal condition that could happen in this universe that I would believe could kill someone with Fitz's abilities and resources. I believe he's even cured cancer. I just wish it didn't have to be something so disgusting.

I also wasted a lot of brain time on the parasites because I didn't remember the darts (in fact, at the time I remember being more worried about some other character than about Fitz), so the only explanation I could come up with was that Prilkop had actually administered it via the shared meal. And that seemed unlikely on multiple fronts, so I was just confused.

I *loved* this book, this trilogy, every part of reading about this universe. People have complained about the slow pace at times - I don't see it that way. The filling in of back story for the multiple story lines - appreciated, as I haven't read those books in years. The merging of storylines - fan service? Maybe. But it worked for me.

Certainly Hobb left plenty of room for new directions to go if she wants to. Bee, Lant, Spark/Ash, the effects of having Liveship dragons ... oh, Bee's realization that war begets war begets more war ...

In a weird way, though, I experience the ending as a tragedy for the royals and their bastards. It was a fitting ending (minus being eaten alive by parasites) for Fitz, the Fool, and Nighteyes (and boy I would love to get an in-world explanation of how Nighteyes has stuck around ... perhaps he's a warg? Oops, wrong universe) ... but Spark is stuck spying in walls and devoting her life to the kingdom. Bee is stuck being a lady, surrounded by people, which sounds miserable for an introvert. Not to mention the stuff she's been through, and I don't see anyone calling a therapist to help her work through it! Nothing's really changed in Buck. The children of the royal family will still, forever, be ground down to serve the ends of the kingdom.


message 14: by Lucy (last edited May 28, 2017 10:30PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lucy | 11 comments First post here :)

Firstly, I love the way the story of Fitz, Nighteyes and the Fool wraps up. I genuinely adored it. Quietly. Lovingly. On their terms. I could not have asked for more in that respect.

Re: the darts, as they were trying to escape Clares Castle, Fitz was struck by a dart and batted it away.

Beef 1 - I loved finally getting an update (note I did not say answers) on the Elderlings and Kelsingra as a whole. But this book did NOT give a satisfying conclusion to these stories and it is my heartfelt hope that Hobb will give them a fitting conclusion also, nothing less would be fair to their stories or the series as a whole.
Beef 2 - Chade's death came across as an afterthought and to me was rather clumsy. Given his history and influence, I didn't really think it was adequate.
Beef 3 - A rather big one now, what of the newly restored dragons? What happened to the other Liveships? Why did we not hear of the other dragons from the Rainwild Chronicles? Sintara, Kalo or Mercor? What happened to Heeby and Tintaglia after leaving Clares? And IceFire????? What did Tarman decide in the end?

I sincerely hope that these questions do get answered because while Assassin's Fate was a fitting end to one storyline, it did no justice to the others.


Linnea | 16 comments Monique wrote: "(and boy I would love to get an in-world explanation of how Nighteyes has stuck around ... perhaps he's a warg? Oops, wrong universe)..."

I've been thinking about this alot too. I wonder how Nighteyes could stay without Fitz noticing. He would have noticed if he had another being in his body, wouldn't he? Is Nighteyes "parasiting" the same way that the woman did on the cat in Tawny man? I remember both Fitz and Nighteyes being repulsed by that. It doesn't really make sense to me.


Eldritch (starshadowe) | 1 comments Linnea wrote: "Monique wrote: "(and boy I would love to get an in-world explanation of how Nighteyes has stuck around ... perhaps he's a warg? Oops, wrong universe)..."

I've been thinking about this alot too. I ..."


I don't think Nighteyes is parasiting but I can't think of how he stuck around. Maybe Fitz didn't notice him because Nighteyes was with Bee as Wolf Father until he reunited with Fitz. But I still don't know how this is possible.


Monique (bounceswoosh) | 4 comments Linnea wrote: "Monique wrote: "(and boy I would love to get an in-world explanation of how Nighteyes has stuck around ... perhaps he's a warg? Oops, wrong universe)..."

I've been thinking about this alot too. I ..."


It could very well be that this was just a decision made to bring back everyone's favorite character for one last dive into the Kleenex - it solves some narrative problems and is satisfying emotionally, even if there's no in-world explanation. And honestly, that's fine with me, because Nighteyes! Squee! But it would be nice if it actually fit with the world building.


message 18: by Linnea (last edited May 29, 2017 08:45AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Linnea | 16 comments I thought about the option that Fitz didn't feel Nighteyes because he was with Bee. But Nighteyes died, like, 20 years before Bee was born!

You might be right, Monique. Maybe it was only Hobb's love for Nighteyes that brought him back. It wouldn't have felt right without Nighteyes joining Fitz in the stone wolf, but I guess I am just not used to plotholes from Hobb.


message 19: by Lucy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lucy | 11 comments The thing that comes to mind about Nighteyes is that when Fitz did one of his healings on Nighteyes, they actually merged for a time, much like he did with the Fool. So perhaps this blending of souls is what makes it possible. Given this happened before Bee was born - and given her ability with Skill and Wit - maybe she was born inheriting this link? That was how I reconciled it anyway.


message 20: by Lucy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lucy | 11 comments And maybe it is something to do with the Wit Bond specifically.


Monique (bounceswoosh) | 4 comments Or Fitz's unusual combo of Wit and Skill... But with zero foreshadowing, ultimately I think this has to have been a choice made simply because it was emotionally satisfying and because seriously, favorite character.


message 22: by Linnea (last edited May 30, 2017 03:16PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Linnea | 16 comments Maybe through the merging of souls with Fitz Nighteyes aquired some Skill. Maybe Nighteyes has been in the Skill current all this time and then come back from it with help from Skill and Wit to help Bee. So maybe it isn't through only Wit Bee and Wolf Father, and Fitz and Nighteyes, are speaking. Don't they know/feel the difference between the magics? Bee probably don't, and Fitz has always had a hard time separating the two magics. It would also make sense to why Bee shuts out Nighteyes as well, when she puts up her Skill walls. I don't remember that being the case for Fitz in the earlier trilogies when Fitz and Nighteyes hadn't yet merged.


message 23: by Alfred (last edited May 30, 2017 07:32PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Alfred Haplo (alfredhaplo) | 550 comments As it turns out, Fitz can't figure it out either so I am not sure we will ever know for sure.

"“Nighteyes. What are you?”

He paused. I am a wolf. You need to be reminded of that?

“You were a wolf. What are you now? A ghost that lives inside me? A mixture of my memories and me thinking what you might say or do?”

Nighteyes then proceeds to give a non-answer of sorts....

EDIT:
My guess is that when Fitz touched the F/F/N carving with his bloody hand in Fool's Assassin, he had somehow "reactivated" Nighteyes (Wit, skill, blood) but there was no need for Nighteyes to appear until someone was in trouble - Bee being lost in the secret tunnels.

Thinking about F/F/N's final merging into stone made me wonder if Fool's gift carving of F/F/N in Fool's Fate (2003) meant that Hobb knew even back then how she had wanted to end the story for this trio. That's quite an accomplishment, to hide a giant hint in plain sight for the last 14 years since book was published.

Anyway, if the story hadn't gone off tangent so many times, perhaps there might be more depth given to how things come to be for the main characters. What is Nighteyes, being one example of many questions I have. I don't need detailed answers for everything, but there should be some logic or reasoning so that the story-telling is more credible. At times, the story went for maximum emotional effect, which I happily succumbed to but after the sadness passed, there's this lingering sense of dissatisfaction still. In a way, I am glad that Assassin's Fate is the last book (for a while?) because another book like this would be irritating. That said, I still loved much of it...


message 24: by Lucy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lucy | 11 comments 'lingering sense of dissatisfaction'

That right there succinctly explains how I feel about it. The book tried to address a number of plotlines but didn't do them justice, in my honest opinion anyway. In hindsight, I think this detracted from focusing on Fitz and the Fool. Yes it brought up many past adventures and mishaps but I don't think that stroll down memory lane really added value.
The more I think on this, the more disappointed I become. Dare I say it..... cover your ears now..... it seems a rather sloppy way of trying to bring it all together. Maybe Hobb is no longer interested in writing about that world and wants to move on. I don't begrudge that but if that is genuinely the case, more care should have been taken.


Monique (bounceswoosh) | 4 comments @Alfred - ah! The carving! I never catch symbolism or themes or anything literary, but now that you mention it, the sculpted dragon does tie back nicely to the carving. I like.

@Lucy - Maybe it was just as hard for her to move on as it is for us? Maybe even harder? I dunno. It didn't feel sloppy, to me. It felt like the last season of any TV show, where they start bringing in favorite characters from previous seasons for brief appearances. The issue, to me, is truly and only with Fitz being eaten by worms, and the nagging feeling that he was giving up (despite saying he wasn't), because it just seemed like such a ridiculous and unnecessarily cruel way for it to end. I'd have rather he died in an explosion in the tunnel, I think.

I think.

Because really, the sculpted wolf is pretty cool, too. I just wish there had been a different way to get there (haven't thought one up yet). And the Fool committed suicide, really - I mean, I realize that he has been weary of the world for a very long time, but still. That's a hard thing to celebrate.


V M John | 2 comments I have to admit I feel slightly empty after reading this book. I was so excited to learn that the story of Fitz and the Fool was to be continued in a new trilogy, but the Fool/Lord Golden/Beloved (with all his wit, humour and charm) who I adored in the first six books wasn't really there to me. I can't stand Amber, a really horrible person, and found the constant swapping between the two parts of the Fool's character didn't make for easy reading. I also found the characters of Lant, Per and Spark were nowhere near as interesting as some of the character in the early books. I couldn't really care about the romance between Lanterns and Spark, which didn't match up to Robin Hobb's usual high standards of bringing her characters to life. I almost feel it would have been more satisfying to finish the stories at the end of Fool's Fate, and leave me with my tears every time I read 'Last Dance of Chances'! Having said that, I still enjoyed this book, and quite liked the fact that all the various storylines came together. It was great to re-meet the dragon keepers, Malta, paragon etc. etc. As others have said, I do wish there could have been a happier ending. Couldn't Fitz, the Fool and Bee just lived happily together for a short time? Is this really the end of the Realm of the Elderlings? II would still love more books - there are still some unexplained storylines (the pale young man Fitz met in the mountains, the baby doll in the Fools rooms in Buck) but I'm afraid this is Robin Hobb's farewell.


message 27: by Mark (new) - rated it 5 stars

Mark Halse | 26 comments That's not how Hobb works. She rarely writes happy endings and I respect her for that.

The Fool was especially infuriating in this series though. It also broke my heart that Fitz loved the Fool more than his own daughter and that she was aware of it. I don't love anyone more than my own child and I never would.


Jeremy (the1germ) | 96 comments Mod
The Fool shattered my heart this trilogy. He hasn't been the same at all. None of his usual humor or wit, so serious and rather shocking in the decisions he makes.

But I can't really complain? Because I get it. His torture in Clerres scarred him - he won't be the same, and all he can see is red. If it benefits his mission, that's pretty much all he cares about now.

Still, I miss the Fool.


message 29: by Alfred (last edited Jun 04, 2017 07:04PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Alfred Haplo (alfredhaplo) | 550 comments Mark wrote: "It also broke my heart that Fitz loved the Fool more than his own daughter and that she was aware of it. "

I didn't get the sense that Fitz loved the Fool more than Bee. Not in his actions and his thoughts, which were all to the contrary. Fitz was constantly ashamed and beat himself up for being a terrible father. He was probably relieved to know that Kettricken will care for Bee as her own; a woman that he and Nighteyes trusted greatly. I think Fitz loved Bee enough to leave the Fool if she had asked. He would have been in the same quandary as having to decide between Molly/Nettle/Farseers and Fool. The Fool knew that in FF, and made the choice for him **.

That Fitz loved her less was only Bee's perspective, and who can blame her? Her newly established relationship with her father up-ended when Fool showed up, which led to her suffering trauma of loss and physical abuse, and now she has to share her father with this same person who caused all her troubles, but that her father obviously loved also. This same person who is sometimes male and female, which must be confusing too, and whom she hardly knows but is now acting like a protective parent. She also has the same "jealous" feelings on hearing about Hope, Nettle's baby. At the same time, Bee seems to have recovered rather well after her father death, knowing that she will be in the loving care of Kettricken and Per. So, maybe she's not as cut up as you think...?

--------------
But yeah, on missing the old Fool, me too. It's not so much that he's lost his saucy and sassy side that I lament, it's that he is Amber for the most part of the book. Amber was pretty cold, Fitz didn't like her, and I don't think as a reader I connected much with this character emotionally.


** On thinking a little more about the ending with Fitz holding his hand out to Fool, and calling for Beloved (oh man, that makes me tear up just remembering it) - I am glad they did the selfish thing for themselves, for once. They have always tried to do the right thing for others - the Farseers, die to bring dragons back, Fool to stay on and care for Bee, to keep apart at the end of FF etc...

So it's nice, that in the very end, they followed their hearts.


message 30: by Lucy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lucy | 11 comments In the Liveship Traders I loved the character that was Amber....

But yes Amber in this book became tedious.

As for Fitz's dislike of Amber... not to be crass but maybe he is a little pissy about his sexuality lol Amber alluded to a great love in Traders. Imagine Fitz's shock on seeing Paragon's face carved in his own likeness. So I would imagine that to Fitz, Amber represented an aspect of the relationship he simply did not want to acknowledge - that of romantic love. Which if you go back through the entire series was absolutely apparent. There was a romantic heart connection and no that does not immediately equate to a sexual relationship. This finally comes out when Fitz point blank asks 'what are we to one another' (not a direct quote but along that line of thinking).

You know in thinking that, I feel bitter that only in the last moments of their lives were they allowed to embrace their own unique love :(


Scarletine | 469 comments Here is my 3.5 star review (I was feeling generous!)

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


Scarletine | 469 comments Jeremy wrote: "The Fool shattered my heart this trilogy. He hasn't been the same at all. None of his usual humor or wit, so serious and rather shocking in the decisions he makes.

But I can't really complain? Because I get it. His torture in Clerres scarred him - he won't be the same, and all he can see is red. If it benefits his mission, that's pretty much all he cares about now.

Still, I miss the Fool."


YES! My feelings exactly. I think Hobb set out to kill all of the affection we had for Fool. She could have made him iconic as a gay/trans/intersex character, but instead she sidestepped any mention of his gender/orientation, stripped him to the bone and left him devoid of personality. Her assasination of the character was brutal. The lack of the 'real' Fool in this trilogy was really upsetting for me because I loved him so. I am glad I wrote Fitz/Fool M/M fanfic after finishing Fools Fate because I was so much kinder to them and gave them a lighter story arc. They deserved it after all of the crap they'd been through.


message 33: by Pamanne (new)

Pamanne | 1 comments I just finished this book a couple of days ago. I thought maybe if I sit on it for a few I might not hate the ending. Mind you, having Fitz, the Fool and Nighteyes together in a stone dragon (wolf) made sense. But the way it came down--ugh! Fitz couldn't have a few years, or months, or weeks, or even days with Bee? Geez. And, c'mon, this "traitor's death"--why in heck would he have been hit with these darts as a first choice of attack? I mean, I thought "traitor's death" meant it was reserved for traitors (hence the name), not strangers!

And then the character of the Fool...again, ugh! Okay, so he wasn't funny and clever as before, I get that. I took no joy in his character throughout this book but let it go. But when he wanted to start it all over again with Bee? Reading her journals *before* she was found made sense, but to try and get her to have him interpret her dreams, discover a new catalyst, etc. on their way home? That was just awful. I hated him at this point!

And then all the loose ends, such as what's to happen with the Rainwilds if all the liveships become dragons, this bothered me too.

I have to say, I really am so disappointed by the ending of this book, and that's the nicest thing I can say about it.


message 34: by Lucy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lucy | 11 comments Pamanne wrote: "I just finished this book a couple of days ago. I thought maybe if I sit on it for a few I might not hate the ending. Mind you, having Fitz, the Fool and Nighteyes together in a stone dragon (wolf)..."

My thoughts exactly!


Wastrel | 270 comments Scarletine wrote: "Jeremy wrote: "The Fool shattered my heart this trilogy. He hasn't been the same at all. None of his usual humor or wit, so serious and rather shocking in the decisions he makes.

But I can't reall..."


Hobb was never intending to write an "icon", she was writing a person. Who, yes, often fails to live up to the pedestal fans often put him on. He's also been an utter wanker right from Assassin's Apprentice onward (remember, a lot of their earliest interactions were Fool publically humiliating Fitz). He's a deceitful, manipulative narcissist and he always has been. Readers tended to forgive him for that because he was funny, and because he was on the side of the protagonists. In this trilogy, he's lost a lot of his sense of humour, he's letting Fitz see more under the amusing mask, and he's also more often at odds with the interests of the other characters, which reminds us just how single-minded and controlling he's always been.



One thing that did disappoint me about this trilogy was its nihilism. Eg Bee destroying the world's greatest library because knowledge can only ever lead to evil, and it's better if we stay ignorant (and occasionally eaten by dragons because it's better to be a prey species because humanity can't be trusted with freedom).

[Also, seeing how broken Nettle was by the life Fitz dropped her into. The way she's obsessed with making sure Bee acts totally 'normal' so that she can't be bullied is heartbreakingly post-traumatic...]

But, it's not like we didn't know it would be depressing and frustrating. That's what Hobb does...


Scarletine | 469 comments If anyone wants an alternative path for Fitz and Fool my M/M Fanfic is set 6 years after Tawny Man. (Spoiler- No one gets tortured or eaten by worms, and G.R.R Martin has not influenced it at all.)
So, If you want to remember how good Fitz and Fool were together this fic is 32k words. Enjoy.

https://archiveofourown.org/works/119...


message 37: by Lucy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lucy | 11 comments Scarletine wrote: "If anyone wants an alternative path for Fitz and Fool my M/M Fanfic is set 6 years after Tawny Man. (Spoiler- No one gets tortured or eaten by worms, and G.R.R Martin has not influenced it at all.)..."

Thanks for sharing the link. I already like that one much better lol


message 38: by Parker (new) - added it

Parker | 74 comments Scarletine wrote: "If anyone wants an alternative path for Fitz and Fool my M/M Fanfic is set 6 years after Tawny Man. (Spoiler- No one gets tortured or eaten by worms, and G.R.R Martin has not influenced it at all.)..."

Thanks for the link. Will most definitely be reading this!


Scarletine | 469 comments Lucy wrote: "Scarletine wrote: "If anyone wants an alternative path for Fitz and Fool my M/M Fanfic is set 6 years after Tawny Man. (Spoiler- No one gets tortured or eaten by worms, and G.R.R Martin has not inf..."

LOL Thanks so much :-)


Scarletine | 469 comments Parker wrote: "Scarletine wrote: "If anyone wants an alternative path for Fitz and Fool my M/M Fanfic is set 6 years after Tawny Man. (Spoiler- No one gets tortured or eaten by worms, and G.R.R Martin has not inf..."

Yay! Thank you. :-)


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