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How should i teach New Interchange 1? the correct way

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message 1: by Morteza (new)

Morteza | 1 comments Mod
Hi there! I'm Morteza 17, I'm teaching some students english, I want to know How should i teach this book ( the correct way ).


message 2: by CMT325 (new)

CMT325 The book is called "New Interchange 1"? I'm sorry, I haven't heard of it. However, the one thing I've learned about teaching is that there is no right or wrong way to teach a book. The important thing is to know your students and go from there. There are a lot of ESL websites that can probably help you. When teaching English, it will probably take a lot of different things to teach-looking at magazines, books, newspaper articles, websites, etc, to give them a full scope of the language.


message 3: by Danesh (new)

Danesh | 1 comments How to teach NEW INTERCHANGE
The procedures outlined below are basic ways to teach each of the recurring types of activities in the Student's Book. Click on an activity type below to continue:
Snapshot Word Power Conversation Grammar Focus Pronunciation Fluency Activities Listening Interchange Activities Writing Reading

S N A P S H O T
The Snapshot activities are designed to introduce the topic of the unit or cycle. Snapshots contain interesting information from the real world, presented in an easy-to-read graphic form. Follow-up questions in the Snapshot enable students to personalize the topic.
There are three general teaching steps for Snapshot:

Step 1. Books closed. Introduce the new topic.
Step 2. Books open. Lead the students through the information in the Snapshot.
Step 3. Do the follow-up questions as a class or in groups.

W O R D P O W E R
The Word Power activities present vocabulary related to the topic of a unit. The vocabulary is then developed through a variety of interesting tasks, such as word maps, charts, collocation exercises, and matching exercises.
There are five general teaching steps for Word Power:

Step 1. Introduce the new topic and elicit associated vocabulary.
Step 2. Model the pronunciation of new words.
Step 3. Explain and model the task.
Step 4. Students complete the task.
Step 5. Check answers with the class.

C O N V E R S A T I O N
The Conversation activities are designed to introduce new grammar in a context. These short, fun dialogs are accompanied by a colorful picture that sets the scene. There are two Conversation exercises in a typical unit. Conversation is usually followed by Grammar Focus.
There are five general teaching steps for Conversation:
Step 1. Set the scene. Set a focus question.
Step 2. Books closed. Students listen once or twice to the audio program.
Step 3. Check students' comprehension.
Step 4. Books open. Students read silently as they listen once more.
Step 5. Students practice the Conversation.

G R A M M A R F O C U S
Grammar Focus activities formally present the new structure that was introduced in Conversation. First, a summary of the new structure is presented, followed by controlled practice. Finally, there is some freer practice of the grammar. In the freer activities, students have the chance to personalize the grammar, using their own information.
There are five general teaching steps for Grammar Focus:

Step 1. Elicit or explain the rules.
Step 2. Present example sentences.
Step 3. Model the task.
Step 4. Students complete the task.
Step 5. Check answers with the class.

P R O N U N C I A T I O N
The Pronunciation activities focus on important features of language such as stress, reductions, and intonation. The Pronunciation exercises are almost always connected to the Conversation and Grammar Focus activities.
There are four general teaching steps for Pronunciation:

Step 1. Books closed. Introduce the pronunciation feature using the audio program.
Step 2. Highlight the pronunciation feature.
Step 3. Model the pronunciation.
Step 4. Check individual responses.


FLUENCY ACTIVITIES
The pair-work, group-work, and role-play activities provide the students with more personalized and meaningful practice of the new structures, functions, and topics.
There are five general teaching steps for Fluency Activities:
Step 1. Set the scene and review the model.
Step 2. Explain and model the task.
Step 3. Divide the class into pairs or groups.
Step 4. Students complete the task.
Step 5. Give students feedback.

L I S T E N I N G
The Listening activities in New Interchange are designed to develop a wide variety of sub-skills, including listening for gist and listening for detail. Charts, photos, illustrations, and other visual aids help students focus on extracting the main ideas or information.
There are five general teaching steps for Listening:

Step 1. Set the scene.
Step 2. Books closed. Set a focus question and play the audio once.
Step 3. Books open. Explain the task.
Step 4. Play the audio program once or twice more as students complete the task.
Step 5. Check answers with the class.

INTERCHANGE ACTIVITIES
Each unit has an extension activity at the back of the book known as an Interchange Activity. The Interchange Activity allows students to practice everything they have learned in the unit in the form of information gaps, surveys, and role plays. In an Interchange Activity, students ask their own information and include language they've learned in previous units as well.
There are seven general teaching steps for Interchange Activities:

Step 1. Set the scene.
Step 2. Assign roles and explain the task.
Step 3. Review the information on the page with students.
Step 4. Model the task.
Step 5. Students complete the task.


WRITING
The Writing activities extend and reinforce the topic and grammar of the unit or cycle. These exercises also develop students' composition skills. Students write postcards and invitations; they write descriptions and opinions; and they write about their own experiences.
There are five general teaching steps for Writing:

Step 1. Review or elicit key language and vocabulary
Step 2. Explain the task and go over the model.
Step 3. Students make notes and then write rough drafts.
Step 4. Students exchange compositions to get feedback.
Step 5. Students edit their compositions and prepare final drafts.

R E A D I N G
The Reading activities help students develop a number of reading skills such as skimming and scanning. In Reading exercises, different types of texts are accompanied by pre-reading questions and a variety of post-reading tasks.
There are five general teaching steps for Reading:

Step 1. Introduce the topic and review key vocabulary.
Step 2. Explain the task.
Step 3. Students read silently and complete the task.
Step 4. Students compare answers in pairs or groups.
Step 5. Check answers with the class.
© Cambridge University Press
Dr.Danesh M.Iranzad
dr_iranzad@yahoo.com
Tabriz - Iran
00989144188014


message 4: by Omid (new)

Omid | 1 comments Hi there, I want to know the theories about teaching each part of interchange...


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