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Introductions > Hi from New York!

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message 1: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments I'm a recently published author here on Goodreads, and I'm glad to see that this group exists--looking forward to some hearty speculation...
PW


message 2: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments Congrats on your publication! and welcome to the group.

Ellen


message 3: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Thank you :)


message 4: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments You're welcome. ^_^

So...what's your book/story about?


message 5: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Hmm. It's a speculation on our possible nature; my self-styled taglinge is
everything we know is until we find out otherwise'. I call it historical futurism...it's really he result of my long-standing interest in history, just with a speculative elementthrown in.

If that makes any sense.

:)


message 6: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments p.s. there is a romantic angle, as I see that's to your liking; I wouldn't refer to it as a 'romance', but a couple of the folks who've read it have claimed it's among their favorite aspects of the book--so I guess it's somewhat well developed...


message 7: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments *laughs* Umm...not really. "Historical futurism" is what is confusing I think. Or at least it is for me. But then I can't discribe my own writing so who am I to judge?


message 8: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Haha I understand. Oh, and I just stumbled onto your introduction; how's your writing coming along??? On Writing was a surprisingly good book,though I remembertaking issue with a few points (darned if I rememeber which ones, haha)...


message 9: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments Its at a standpoint right now, thanks for asking though.

My characters have decided to revolt and save the bad guy--so they brought in an element that I was not prepared for: Navy SEALs. It doesn't make sense in anyway, yet everytime I try to remove them they find their way back in...so I've given up removing them and have just gone looking for a way to make it work. Some days are better then others.

If you want a group to discuss technique etc--try "On Fiction Writing". It is a great group of people.


message 10: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Interesting! Thank you very much :) I know how it goes, characters writing themselves; sometimes it's good, though, the result of well plotted characters that begin to do as they see fit--in a manner of speaking, of course!


message 11: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments My characters evidently have minds of their own. I write in first person--or at least this manuscript is in first person and my main character has a knack for taking me by surprise. I'm learning to let things go and just go with the flow so to speak.


message 12: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Interesting. What's your story about?


message 13: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments *laughs* You had to ask...prepare to be confused!

It was supposed to be about a psychic who finds out she is more then a psychic and how she deals with everything--the family drama, political drama etc.

Instead I have a mismash of a mystery/crime (I'm not sure if it is mystery since when the story opens they have already found the bad guy and are just plotting how to capture him), military (the Navy SEALs), paranomal (psychics, fey, were creatures and vampires etc.), oh, and espionage--there seems to be a government coverup going on which is why the SEALs were called in. The government wants to kill the bad guy before he can expose the existance of a psychic ability that allows for the identification and ranking of psychic skills. (VERY long story).

And lets not forget the family that is sticking their noses in, or that she (my character Brianna) still finds out that she is more then she thought she was....

See? confusing.


message 14: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Whoa :-o

Whatcha calling it so far? How much have you got written?


message 15: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments It is titled (for now) Crimson Betrayals and I am about 40,000 words into it.


message 16: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Oooh, 40,000 is progress. Good luck! :) Check out my book's back cover; tell me if you think it sounds interesting...

"On an ordinary spring day in 2008, a series of orchestrated explosions sends an already uncertain world into a state of panic. Several days later, identical notes are delivered to governments and news agencies around the world, issuing a bizarre announcement and a cryptic threat. Conventional assumptions about human nature and potential are about to be challenged, on a scale not yet seen..."

Whatcha think?


message 17: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments Interesting.


message 18: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Thank you! :)


message 19: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments You're welcome. ^_^

...and we are back where we started.



message 20: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Haha indeed.

What part of the country do you write in?


message 21: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments The western...though I'm a little more east then I was last year...only by about an hour though.


message 22: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Aha! I'm in NYC--shouldn't still be up, but I'm watching bad tv! And engaging a fellow reader, of course...


message 23: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments I've been looking up news stories. I have found two worthy of posting on the "On Fiction" news thread. One was a newsweek article on a serial killer in L.A. (active since 1988--I think, with a big gap in the 90's and started again in 2002) the second was on a recal of hand sanitizer--evidently it has harmful bacteria in it.

But I think I may be going to bed soon. My eyes are starting to blur.


message 24: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments ugh. Now I know I've been up too long--I can no longer spell. When my spelling starts to go its time for bed.

It was nice talking to you. Take care.

Ellen


message 25: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Ah, I check out news stories allthe time.

As for hitting the hay, me too--nice chatting with you! Have a good night...


message 26: by Marc (new)

Marc (AuthorGuy) | 97 comments Historical futurism is common enough, with those writers who see cycles in human behavior. Asimov's Foundation trilogy is pretty much a recap of the Middle Ages.

Ellen - my characters write the story for me all the time. I treat it as the sign of a good book when the characters do that. My own last novel morphed on me as yours did. I started it as a mystery and it became a paranormal with romantic elements. That's what's so much fun about writing, you never know where it'll go.


message 27: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments Hey Marc,

I didn't know that about Asimov, but one of my favorite quotes is by HG Wells: 'human history is more an dmore a race between education and catastrophe.' And I do believe that futurism, in general, is often motivated by a study of human history or at heast the human condition--so thanks for the affirmation.
PW


message 28: by Marc (new)

Marc (AuthorGuy) | 97 comments As long as humans don't change the crap they go through won't change either, just the circumstances. Look at Joss Whedon's Firefly, or some of Heinlein's work, where settlement of frontier planets involves a reversion to frontier behavior and techniques.


message 29: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments It's funny, I I like the story of Firefly but what I saw of the series seemed a bit chesy to me in its execution--maybe because it was made for tv, but then again so were Galactica and The X Files, both of which I loved. Anyway, I don't know if you've seen Serenity, the movie based on Firefly, but I own it--better than the series, I think, though it really isn't all that different.
PW


message 30: by Marc (new)

Marc (AuthorGuy) | 97 comments I own the series, the movie, all Buffy seasons, all Angel seasons, Dr. Horrible, and I get the comics.

What do you write?


message 31: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 30 comments Marc wrote: "Ellen - my characters write the story for me all the time. I treat it as the sign of a good book when the characters do that. My own last novel morphed on me as yours did. I started it as a mystery and it became a paranormal with romantic elements. That's what's so much fun about writing, you never know where it'll go."

So people keep telling me...personally I'm not sure how I can have so many elements in it without making it seem...unrealistic.

Ellen


message 32: by Marc (new)

Marc (AuthorGuy) | 97 comments Actually it's the lack of elements that makes books seem unrealistic. Proper characters are 3-D, they transcend the bounds of genre. Not that real characters will necessarily change the genre of the story on you. I was writing about werewolves before, and I'm still writing about werewolves now. It's still a paranormal, but now it's love and adventure instead of mystery and horror. The important thing is that it all hangs together. Some of those elements may need their own book to be properly used.


message 33: by Paul (new)

Paul West (firstcauseproject) | 29 comments I agree, but the thing is, the characters also have to vary in depth and dimension to make it more realistic. Unfortunately, lots of people interact with the world and each other in a one dimensional fashion; this ought to be reflected as well. A novel full of uncommon people makes for less believable reading, I think, even if uncommon characters are the focus of you story. And of course, the ordinary folks can't seem too blatantly cookie cutter either, otherwise they come across as 'straw men' or props.


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