The Next Best Book Club discussion

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Group Read Discussions > The Reader - Movie Spoilers

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message 1: by Lori, Super Mod (last edited Aug 01, 2009 06:40AM) (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
Since this is our book and movie pair, we will have 3 threads to discuss. Two spoilers and one non spoiler.....

Spoilers on the movie can be discussed here.
How did it line up with the book?
Which did you prefer?



message 2: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/8...

I am closing the original thread that was posted in "Wanna Discuss THis Novel" and linking it here for you to reference. I believe it has spoilers for both the movie and the book, so be careful if you havent been in it already.


message 3: by Diane (new)

Diane  (dianedj) I love the movie. I thought the casting was outstanding. Just started the book and am able to visualize the scenes as I go.


message 4: by Diane (new)

Diane  (dianedj) Here are my thoughts on the movie, which I preferred much more than the book. I am not sure if it is because I saw the movie first, but I thought the book was "flat" in some parts, yet I never felt that in the movie:

While I give the book between 2 and 3 stars, I would easily give the movie adaptation 5 stars. The casting of the movie was superb, in my opinion, and there were a number of scenes that much more powerful to me in the movie, vs. in the book. From what I've read on threads, quite a few people really disliked the book; but I hope that will not deter them from seeing the movie (which I've watched twice I like it so much)

SPOILERS FOLLOW:
The ending of movie differed from the book; and I most definitely preferred the movie ending. In the movie's end, I felt Michael made a huge step by taking his daughter to Hanna's gravesite where he was going to confide in her the story of himself and Hanna. I found it very touching.

I was also deeply moved when Michael started 'reading' to Hanna via the tapes in the movie. It may have been the way the scenes went back and forth from Michael to Hanna, and the music...and I was also more struck by the visual scene when Michael went to the prison to see Hanna just before her release. For some reason, the writings of these two major scenes seemed flat in the book.

In the movie, I loved the law professor's role and the impact he had on the students and I very much enjoyed the "tense" scenes of debate over the trial. That too was missed in the book to me.

One part that I did prefer in the book vs. the movie - when Michael visited his father to discuss Hanna's secret and the way his father explained that pretty much it was not Michael's place or business to reveal. In the movie, Michael's father died and he never even went home for the funeral.




message 5: by Leila (last edited Aug 17, 2009 06:38AM) (new)

Leila (leilasbooks) Okay, so was it just me or was there a LOT of sex in it? I remember that yes, there was sex in the book but woah, I didn't expect that much and that graphic in the film.

Otherwise, I thought it was a brilliant adaptation. They had most important scenes in it and I have to say, for being a film based on a book, they were were incredibly faithful to it and I'm impressed. Like Diane, I preferred the film ending because it made sense and it was touching and I also missed the father scene. I would have liked to see that in the film.




message 6: by Felina (new)

Felina The only thing that really struck me that was different was that in the movie Hanna and Michael seemed to actually care for eachother.

It seemed to me in the book Hanna was really only using Michael. And Michaels interest in Hanna was really infatuation.

In the movie Michael cries when Hanna is convicted while in the book he keeps repeating that he is feeling nothing as he is watching the trial.

I liked the book but I definately liked the movie better. And yes there was ALOT of sex. Much more than described in the book.


message 7: by Diane (new)

Diane  (dianedj) Agreed there was a lot of sex in the movie. I couldn't help but wonder how the "young" Michael felt doing all that nudity with such a big star, Kate Winslet :) From what I read in the papers, she really coached him along.

I thought the book's sex scenes were well written and really gave intimate details of how Michael was feeling from the first time up until the end. And how he "learned" from Hanna.


message 8: by Felina (new)

Felina Its funny because in the book I never got the idea that Hanna was some experienced bomb shell sex goddess like other people seemed to. She seemed very average to me.


message 9: by Diane (new)

Diane  (dianedj) hi Felina. I don't think that Hanna was an experienced bomb shell sex goddess, but only to Michael she was. I think she was a lonely woman, and very reclusive. What kind of life did she have? Work ... hiding her secret of illiteracy, lonely. And then Michael comes along.


message 10: by Apokripos (new)

Apokripos (apokalypse) Ohh, poor Michael. Do you think Hanna's the cause why his character didn't develop or mature at all in the book (or to some extent in the movie)? Is the way he is addressed by Hanna, calling him "jungchen" (which I think translates to kid) an indication of this when they met again while Hanna is in prison, and Michael now a full grown man?


message 11: by Apokripos (new)

Apokripos (apokalypse) By the way, I very much liked this Kate Winslet dialogue: "You have no power to upset me!" She like said that on her very first quarrel with Michael... just love that line that's so oozing with so much positivity and strength of character. It almost seems like Hanna insubordinates the audience..


message 12: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 8 comments I really really enjoyed both versions. One thing I will say that I enjoyed much more about the novel is that there seemed to be many more small instances where Hana's strange behavior confused Michael, and all later came together when it was revealed that she was illiterate. Once that secret is revealed in the novel you look back on everything she did and said and it makes more sense and ties her character together and the pride associated with not confessing that secret that she has becomes the core of her character. I didn't feel that as strongly in the film.


message 13: by Diane (new)

Diane  (dianedj) jzhunagev wrote: "By the way, I very much liked this Kate Winslet dialogue: "You have no power to upset me!" She like said that on her very first quarrel with Michael... just love that line that's so oozing with so ..."

Agreed!! And the WAY she said it. I thought, I must remember that line and practice saying it : )


message 14: by Apokripos (new)

Apokripos (apokalypse) Diane wrote: "jzhunagev wrote: "By the way, I very much liked this Kate Winslet dialogue: "You have no power to upset me!" She like said that on her very first quarrel with Michael... just love that line that's ..."

Yeah sometimes one must... specially when your quarreling with your husband/bf/gf, etc...


message 15: by Erika (new)

Erika (erikareading) Kathy wrote: "I really really enjoyed both versions. One thing I will say that I enjoyed much more about the novel is that there seemed to be many more small instances where Hana's strange behavior confused Mich..."

Hey Kathy. That's EXACTLY how I felt. When I read the book and everything came together as Michael realizes she's illiterate it was so much more interesting. It was like a big "OHHHHH!!!" moment. In the film I think they made it too obvious and the scene where he figures it out just doesn't have as much impact on me.

I loved the line Kate Winslet said about Michael having no power to upset her too.


message 16: by Haelee (last edited Aug 28, 2009 12:04PM) (new)

Haelee (leehae831) jzhunagev wrote: "Ohh, poor Michael. Do you think Hanna's the cause why his character didn't develop or mature at all in the book (or to some extent in the movie)? Is the way he is addressed by Hanna, calling him "j..."

I do think that their relationship, and everything that happened between them did give Michael a handicap in his relationships later in life. The way he feels about people and what he expects from life become different after she leaves.....I got the feeling while reading the book, that even though he says he feels nothing while watching her at the trials, he actually is feeling a great deal. He understands why she had to leave and greatly identifies with Hana's victims.

Hana's whole character is just such a sad, practical woman. I really started to feel for her when I was reading the trial scenes. The one that really hit me the most is when she's being questioned and the other guards are blaming the whole affair on her.....and all she can do is tell the truth. Her logic is so straight forward that she asks the judge "There were six guards and hundreds of prisoners. What would you have done?" And he cannot reply.

I really did enjoy this book, but I have to say that I'm VERY glad I rented and watched the movie alone and in the comfort of my own home. I hate sitting through sex scenes with someone else in the room....it's just so awkward.


message 17: by Apokripos (new)

Apokripos (apokalypse) Haelee wrote: "jzhunagev wrote: "Ohh, poor Michael. Do you think Hanna's the cause why his character didn't develop or mature at all in the book (or to some extent in the movie)? Is the way he is addressed by Han..."

Which do you think is better? The book or the film?
I think both are the best...


message 18: by Diane (new)

Diane  (dianedj) Halee, I'm glad you felt sorry a bit for Hanna. I did too, but I'm not sure if many others did.

jzhunagev, I preferred the movie well over the book. But I am still not sure if it is because I saw the movie first and I truly loved it from beginning to end. The book was a bit ho-hum to me in spots. I've sent it off to a good "reader" friend with the stipulation that she must rent the movie after she reads the book, and then we'll trade our thoughts.


message 19: by Haelee (new)

Haelee (leehae831) To tell the truth, I really enjoyed both of them. I found Kate Winslet's performance very true to the character, while also giving everyone a person to identify with. Which I think is the only thing lacking in the book. The book falls flat to a lot of people, and I think that it's because the way things are said mean so much in our language. (Keep in mind the German author. Not sure if it's a translation or not.)


It's quite late so I apologize for rambling, but there really is no way for me to choose one over the other.....they were both SOOOO touching, and wonderful. :)

Don't you guys think so too?




message 20: by Apokripos (new)

Apokripos (apokalypse) Haelee wrote: "To tell the truth, I really enjoyed both of them. I found Kate Winslet's performance very true to the character, while also giving everyone a person to identify with. Which I think is the only th..."

I think so too, Haelee...



message 21: by Diane (new)

Diane  (dianedj) Haelee wrote: "To tell the truth, I really enjoyed both of them. I found Kate Winslet's performance very true to the character, while also giving everyone a person to identify with. Which I think is the only th..."

Haelee - yes, you're right about it being a German translation, and things can certainly have gotten lost in translation.

I should also mention that I am very happy I read the book. Even though I preferred the movie, I was anxious to read the book after seeing it. I was able to picture everyone as it was cast.


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