The Banned Books Club discussion

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The Color Purple by Alice Walker > The Color Purple by Alice Walker

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message 1: by Cindy (new)

Cindy I read a sample of this book and it is way too graphic for me. I was thinking about reading it, but don't think I have the stomach for it. I don't have kids in a school system so I am asking an honest question. If they came home with this book, would you let them read it? The first page was shocking, call me a prude, others have done so.


message 2: by Kim. E. (new)

Kim. E. Loretta, you're such a good egg!

Cindy, I've seen the movie and admit parts were tough and just downloaded the book tonight, so I can't give you an opinion on the book yet. I have to admit that professionally I worked in tough situations so I treated my daughter differently growing up. I'm probably going to start it Tuesday and can let you know, I know this group is about banned books and some will be hard, but I also agree with Loretta. She's the one that told me not every book needs to be read by me.

It's okay to move on instead. It just means there's something better on the bookshelf.


message 3: by Christine (new)

Christine | 6 comments This has been on my TBR for awhile and I'm really glad that we are reading it. I did see the movie and it evoked a lot of emotion in me and we had quite a few interesting discussions around our house afterwards. I'm looking forward to hearing other peoples views regarding this book. I hoping to start this in the next day or two.


midnightreadingg (httpsreadandbleedwordpresscom) | 42 comments Mod
I've already read this and it's a great read! Can't wait to hear what all of you think of it XD


message 5: by Serian (new)

Serian (mamapata) | 3 comments I read this when I was in school - I don't remember exactly but I suspect I was about 15? I don't entirely understand the US school system - how old is an honors class?
I don't have kids so I can't comment about whether or not I would let kids read it. It depends a lot on the child really I think - some will already have been through similar events in their own lives, some are more sensitive, rates of maturity differ, etc. That said, when I read it, I loved it - it remains one of my top books and I am looking forward to rereading it.


message 6: by Kim. E. (new)

Kim. E. I have it on my tablet right now and have read approximately 50 pages so far. I've never read this before, and have vague memories from the movie.


message 7: by Christine (new)

Christine | 6 comments Starting this tonight! Can't wait.
C:)


midnightreadingg (httpsreadandbleedwordpresscom) | 42 comments Mod
Serian wrote: "I read this when I was in school - I don't remember exactly but I suspect I was about 15? I don't entirely understand the US school system - how old is an honors class?
I don't have kids so I can'..."


When it comes to books, I usually don't like putting age limits on it but I definitely remember being shocked when I read this at 17!


midnightreadingg (httpsreadandbleedwordpresscom) | 42 comments Mod
Kim. E. wrote: "I have it on my tablet right now and have read approximately 50 pages so far. I've never read this before, and have vague memories from the movie."

I hope you enjoy it Kim! :D


message 10: by midnightreadingg (new)

midnightreadingg (httpsreadandbleedwordpresscom) | 42 comments Mod
Christine wrote: "Starting this tonight! Can't wait.
C:)"


Honestly can't wait to read your opinions on it!


message 11: by Kim. E. (new)

Kim. E. I'm still reading but wanted to admit that I have some mixed feekings (did NOT see this coming) about this book being banned. I can remenber being about 13 and really wanting to see this really controversial but popular movie rated R. I begged my father to let me see it and he finally relented but only if he watched it with me. In the end I was disappointed I had made it so much bigger in my mind.

I have an incredible daughter and always laid out things honestly from birth, but at a level she could get at that time. She asked me recently why I never sat her down to have "the talk". I laughed and told her I didn't have to because we had it all the time. I reminded her about watching a fav tv comedy she always loved that focused on a gay character. I watched that with her every week no matter what and then always used the commercials and comedy if warranted to reinforce a point they were getting at. That was just one example. She laughed, remembered, and agreed. I know for us this method worked b/c she's very open about all issues of sexuality with me. She's also is very aware of social justice, politics, human rights, etc.

Why did I write that essay? Because there is a part of me as a mama who would probably feel better if we read this together. I may change my mind when I'm finished and I wouldn't ban this in high school. I'm thinking younger.

Again, I have mixed feelings about this, but isn't the point of this group to discuss these issues?


message 12: by Kim. E. (new)

Kim. E. Ivy, thank you so much for your posting. You brought up so many good points.

I've been thinking about this more and more, especially in the environment we're in in the US right now regarding the presidency fight with the legitimate, free press that is being threatened so much right now in ways I never thought I would see here.

I do agree that there is some "it" part of being placed on the list and I'm sure there are books that are written to be as controversial as possible, which saddens me. The same with that ridiculous movie plot.

I hate some of the ways some people use the first amendment to be so very vile, but I will fight to the death for all of us to have the ability to be free.

BTW, I found over the weekend this book The Accusation: Forbidden Stories from Inside North Korea by Bandi was smuggled out of North Korea by anonymous author writing about what it is really like there.


message 13: by Christine (new)

Christine | 6 comments So many interesting view points to ponder. To me, this is what makes a book amazing- when a book triggers things inside of us that are sensitive, uncomfortable or even just plain joyful. Thank you for these very interesting posts.

On a completely different track- one of the things I enjoyed about this book was how Celie becomes comfortable in her own skin and through that finds her freedom on many different levels (emotionally, physically, financially, spiritually- to name just a few of the ways she finds freedom).

I agree that many authors will include "controversial" characters for either shock value or for book sales but I never felt that way about the characters in this book. To me, the characters were multi-dimensional. The characters were at first caught up in the rut of the lives that they were born into and then they eventually found ways for not only surviving but also thriving in their own unique lives.

If my my high school/college aged boys came home with this book I would let them read it. Personally, I think it is important for them to gain an understanding of "uncomfortable" topics. However, I always try to read what they are reading in school so that I can discuss it with them. I think it is part of my responsibility as a parent to provide my point of view.

I do also respect that some parents may not want their children to read certain material and I think it is important for teachers to provide alternative material. I have signed many permission forms for my kids to be able to read certain books in school and the students that did not have permission were given alternative reading assignments- there is a lot of fantastic literature out there and every book is not for every person.


message 14: by Kim. E. (new)

Kim. E. ✿Ivy Roots✿ wrote: "Kim. E. wrote: "Ivy, thank you so much for your posting. You brought up so many good points.

I've been thinking about this more and more, especially in the environment we're in in the US right no..."


I'm sorry i didn't see this comment earlier. I've been very sick and just trying to hang on where I can.

Bandi is a pseudonym in order to protect the author. I only just found out about this and am unable to tell you anymore, but I'm as curious as you to know more. Keep each other notified?


message 15: by Gary (new)

Gary This is one of those books where I committed the cardinal sin of seeing the movie before reading the novel. So, while I did enjoy the book, I kept seeing the characters as the actors, not the other way around. To this day I can't look at Oprah Winfrey without hearing the quote that begins, "All my life I had to fight...."


message 16: by Gary (new)

Gary ✿Ivy Roots✿ wrote: "Lol. I haven't watched the movie, but I'm looking forward to doing so. My book list is as full as my movie list so it might take a while."

The movie is worth checking out for fans of the book. At least, they didn't turn the whole thing into a musical or cast white actors in the black roles or have the whole thing take place on a torpedo boat (as Joe Gillis might say.)


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