50 books to read before you die discussion

A Passage to India
This topic is about A Passage to India
50 views
Book Discussions - 50 Books > A Passage to India

Comments Showing 1-14 of 14 (14 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Buck (spectru) Our group read for February 2017 from our list of 50 is A Passage to India


Katy Mann | 19 comments I read this last fall. It had been a TBR forever and when I came across a copy, I read it. Interesting.


Annie (annie_thomas) | 69 comments Read last year.
I couldn't take to this book. It was slow going. Didn't like how India was portrayed or any of the characters. Perhaps my expectation were too high as this is seen as one of the great classics..


message 4: by Donna (new)

Donna Davis (floridagirl55) | 40 comments Annie,
The Indian characters are written from a British Imperialist view point. As is India itself. I try to read the book with from a historical viewpoint---making sure to look at its character portrayals, mores, and manners through the lens of that time.
I quite enjoyed the book, and I found the Indian people portrayed as more fully rounded characters than a Kipling book, for instance.
Whatever you do, don't watch the film version--Indians played by white actors.


Buck (spectru) Donna wrote: "The Indian characters are written from a British Imperialist view point. As is India itself. "

The British Imperialist point of view, as written in a number of Victorian era and earlier novels, can be quite disturbing. Heart of Darkness, for example. The attitudes taken for granted in Robinson Crusoe are appalling.


Buck (spectru) Here is my brief review from a couple of years ago:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

I hardly remember it.


Annie (annie_thomas) | 69 comments Donna wrote: "Annie,
The Indian characters are written from a British Imperialist view point. As is India itself. I try to read the book with from a historical viewpoint---making sure to look at its character po..."


You are right of course. Somehow I just couldn't distance myself for this book. Perhaps because I was in India at the time during my annual holiday and this was the first book I picked up.
I had been planning to read it for ages, curious as to how Forster wrote about India. I think his intent was to throw light on the hypocrisy existent in the society, but it didnt penetrate for me.
I love the title of the book.
Haven't read any Kipling beyond 'The Jungle Book' & 'Just so stories'. I will be careful to pick a better time when I read the next one!


message 8: by Khadija (new)

Khadija | 1 comments someone have the novel pdr or ebook plz


message 9: by Buck (last edited Feb 11, 2017 04:44PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Buck (spectru) This was published in 1924, about a year too late to be in the public domain. I could not find it on Librivox or Gutenberg.org. Have you tried your public library?


Annie (annie_thomas) | 69 comments Its showing up on https://archive.org/ when I google the book, but I don't know if the site is legitimate.


message 11: by Lisa (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 743 comments I love EM Forster. Both Howard's End and A Room with a View were beautifully written, cleverly thought out, romantic social commentaries. I expected similar from a Passage to India.

I found this book so different. A harsher commentary which urges a stern examination of colonialism. It was thought provoking and still relevant in today's world.


Christine I read this a while back and what I took from it is how easy misunderstandings occur when people are either ignorant or don't bother to make an effort to understand the norms and values of other cultures.

I do travel around a lot but I always try and not take too much of my Britishness with me, but it's not easy.


message 13: by Lisa (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lisa (lisadannatt) | 743 comments Christine wrote: "I read this a while back and what I took from it is how easy misunderstandings occur when people are either ignorant or don't bother to make an effort to understand the norms and values of other cu..."

I agree with that.

I work with many diverse population groups and have found that most people are willing to share customs and beliefs if you show interest.


message 14: by Carol (new) - added it

Carol | 29 comments I'm sorry I was unable to read this while you were reading it. I am behind and started with the Bronte sisters. Interesting discussion. I feel the same way about "Gone With the Wind". Everyone seems to love it, but I can't get past the slavery and how we're supposed to believe the slaves were happy and treated like family. Give me a break. I can't get past Downton Abbey either. I don't care how beautiful the dresses are. I can't stand that class system and the idea that they felt "better than" just because they were born into that family. But reading these books expose us to this thinking and how far we've come. Now we need to question what our blind spots are now. And what books will be read 100 years from now where they will be saying the same thing about us?


back to top