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Archive > Skinnytaste Fast and Slow - February 2017

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message 1: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
Skinnytaste Fast and Slow: Knockout Quick-Fix and Slow-Cooker Recipes for Real Life by Gina Homolka was voted by our members as our additional read for the Food and Cookbook nominee.

Skinnytaste Fast and Slow Knockout Quick-Fix and Slow-Cooker Recipes for Real Life by Gina Homolka

80+ Under 30 Minute Dishes and 60 Slow Cooker Recipes
The easiest, tastiest, most convenient healthy recipes--ever!
With Skinnytaste Fast and Slow, you can get a nutritious, flavor-packed, figure-friendly meal--complete with a flourless chocolate brownie made in a slow cooker--on the table any night of the week. Gina Homolka, founder of the widely adored blog Skinnytaste, shares 140 dishes that come together in a snap--whether in a slow cooker or in the oven or on the stovetop. Favorites include:
Slow Cooker
Chicken and Dumpling Soup
Korean-Style Beef Tacos
Spicy Harissa Lamb Ragu
Peach-Strawberry Crumble
Under 30 Minutes
Zucchini Noodles with Shrimp and Feta
Pizza-Stuffed Chicken Roll-Ups
Grilled Cheese with Havarti, Brussels Sprouts, and Apple
Cauliflower "Fried" Rice
Each recipe includes nutritional information, which can help you take steps toward weight and health goals, and many dishes are vegetarian, gluten-free, and freezer-friendly--all called out with helpful icons. Gina's practical advice for eating well and 120 color photos round out this indispensable cookbook.
-- Amazon: 2016 Best Books of the Year: Cookbooks & Food Writing


message 2: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
I have a hold on this one at my library. I'm still #2, but I'm hopeful that I will get it before the end of the month. I'm looking forward to checking out some of these recipes.


message 3: by Vicki Willis (new)

Vicki Willis | 865 comments I actually bought this cookbook.
Just flipping through it has made me so hungry!
I liked that she was assoicated with Weight Watchers at one time, so she thinks like a weight watcher. I was bummed that this one didn't have the point values, but the nutritional info is there so it will be easy to calculate.
There are quite a lot of recipes that I would try with for my family. With lacrosse season starting for my sons, some more crock pot ideas will be great.
I will let you know when I actually make something.


message 4: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
That's great to hear, Vicki! I'm going to wait for my library copy, then if I love it I may pick up a copy. I have a ridiculous amount of cookbooks and I mostly cook the same recipes that I know by heart. It is fun to try something new occasionally though.


message 5: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
The library has had my copy of the book listed as "in transit" for a couple of days now. Hopefully, I'll have a copy soon!


message 6: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
I was just able to get my copy from the library! At a quick glance, it looks like there are going to be a lot of good recipes. Can't wait to get a closer look. :)


message 7: by Vicki Willis (new)

Vicki Willis | 865 comments Well, I tried a couple recipes so far.
The roasted cabbage was really yummy and the egg bowls (ok, I realize I didn't really need a cookbook to make this) were quick and easy.
I went through and marked some others that I am going to try and worked out the Weight Watcher point for them. A lot of them, though healthier than a lot of other dinners, were not really in a realistic point range for someone trying to lose weight on Weight Watchers. I know she didn't write this for WW specifically, but I was hoping it would be a good point value.
I am rating it 4 stars because there are many recipes that are easy to through together and also "normal" type food my family would typically eat.
For me a good book to own.


message 8: by Kristie, Moderator (last edited Feb 13, 2017 04:41PM) (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
So far, the recipes look like they use common foods to my family too. That's one thing I look for in recipes. I generally want somewhat quick, easy, and ingredients that I might actually have or can at least easily find.

I haven't tried any of the recipes yet, but I'll go back through and choose a few favorites to try.


message 9: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
I may end up buying this one. I just went through and figured I'd mark (sticky flags, no damage to the library book!) some of the recipes that I want to try. I marked 21 pages. lol I will be able to try a few before returning the book, but if they're good, it may be worth buying my own copy.


message 10: by Vicki Willis (new)

Vicki Willis | 865 comments Yes, I made the buffalo chicken and then used it for burritos and then the next day for potato skins. It was easy and good. My kids loved it and it could be used in salad jars and all sorts of things.
I went through and flagged pages too. My goal is to try a new recipe every week (haha, ask me in 2 weeks how that is going?)


message 11: by Picky Virgo (new)

Picky Virgo  (pickyvirgo) I just finished this book, and am planning to prepare one of the Slow recipes (Osso Buco) either this weekend or next week. I had trouble finding the veal shanks but finally prevailed.

I've already ordered the hardcover version and will return my Kindle copy as soon as the hardcover arrives. While I adore my Kindle, I prefer a physical volume when I'm reading any kind of a how-to book.

One annoyance: I do not own a Spiralizer and have no plans to purchase one. I wish the author had provided alternatives for the Spiralized vegetables she recommends as part of the meal.

Two additional notes:
1. I would gladly pay a bit more for a ring-bound or spiral-bound cookbook, or any other how-to book. (Say, a spiral-bound book would be a natural in this case, wouldn't it?)(Sorry.)
2. Because my husband and I are empty-nesters I've become adept at downsizing recipes to feed the two of us without leftovers. I own two 1.5-quart slow cookers that I use often, and they'll come in very handy with this cookbook as well.


message 12: by Vicki Willis (new)

Vicki Willis | 865 comments Good points Virgo!
I totally agree about having a physical book for how to's. I hadn't thought about a spiral bound one! How smart would that be!
Why would you not consider spiralizing veggies? (Just curious)


message 13: by Picky Virgo (new)

Picky Virgo  (pickyvirgo) Vicki wrote: "Good points Virgo!
I totally agree about having a physical book for how to's. I hadn't thought about a spiral bound one! How smart would that be!
Why would you not consider spiralizing veggies? (Ju..."


My husband and I are in our sixties and set in our ways, but he's particularly in the concrete. One meal that included spaghetti squash was enough to convince him that vegetables are no substitute for pasta. He's good-natured about trying new things, but veggie noodles fall into the " tried 'em, don't like 'em" category as far as he's concerned.


message 14: by Lynn, Moderator (new)

Lynn | 4119 comments Mod
Thank you for sharing that Picky Virgo, totally put a smile while imagined your husband trying the spaghetti squash and grumbling about new fangled ways :)


message 15: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
I ended up buying a copy too. I transferred all my flags over to my personal copy. :) I also like physical copies of certain types of books, most notably cookbooks and self-help or how-to books. I agree that this would have been preferable as a spiral-bound book, Picky Virgo.

I would think that you could julienne the veggies for the same effect in the recipes and it would work just as well. They'd just be a different shape, sort of like a spiral pasta versus a penne. It would be worth trying if one of those recipes appeals to you.


message 16: by Picky Virgo (new)

Picky Virgo  (pickyvirgo) Update: The time is 9:50 a.m., and a half-recipe (2 pcs.) of Osso Buco has descended into the slow-cooker. I will update after supper!


message 17: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
Oh yay! Can't wait to see how it turns out.


message 18: by Vicki Willis (new)

Vicki Willis | 865 comments Me too! I will be checking back!


message 19: by Lynn, Moderator (new)

Lynn | 4119 comments Mod
We need a picture!


message 20: by Picky Virgo (last edited Mar 03, 2017 06:27AM) (new)

Picky Virgo  (pickyvirgo) Sorry, no picture, I was gone all day and we gobbled it up B4 I read the posts. I can tell you that it looked just like the photo except that the food stylist who took the pic (probably the author(?)) likely thickened the sauce prior to taking the snapshot.

In any case, it was fabulous. It cooked for approximately 8 hours on Low in my 1.5-quart oval Proctor-Silex slow-cooker. I used about half a can of petite-diced tomatoes and two cloves of garlic for the half-recipe, otherwise just cut the rest of the ingredient amounts in half. The flavors of the herbs came through beautifully. DH is already wondering when I'm planning to fix it again.

Rather than buying broth, I use a concentrate called Better Than Bouillon, which was actually recommended by a local chef as an alternative to making one's own stock. But next time I might try using red wine instead, just to see what happens.

In short: Recommended!!!

Edited to change 1st word from Scotty to Sorry. I need to pay more attention to the decisions being made by my iPad's auto-correct feature!


message 21: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 6032 comments Mod
Glad to hear it, Picky Virgo!


message 22: by Vicki Willis (new)

Vicki Willis | 865 comments Great! What page is that recipe on? I can't find it.


message 23: by Picky Virgo (last edited Mar 03, 2017 03:57AM) (new)

Picky Virgo  (pickyvirgo) Vicki wrote: "Great! What page is that recipe on? I can't find it."

It's on pages 198-199, Vicki. This points out serious (I think) flaws in the cookbook's design. For starters, the index is arranged by main ingredient. The Osso Buco recipe, for instance, is found under Veal. Just to complicate matters even more, the title of every recipe deigned to be crock-potted is preceded by the term "Slow Cooker", both in the index and on the recipe page, which I consider serious overkill. I may have to remove a star from my rating. (Since I prepared the dish using my Kindle copy, which I've since returned for a refund, I didn't see the index until I used it to answer your question.)

In my experience, this recipe, minus its Slow Cooker prefix, would be found twice in most cookbooks' indexes, once under Veal and once under Osso Buco. Using this index will take some getting used to. The Osso Buco remains near the top of my personal Favorite Crock Pot Recipes list, though.


message 24: by Vicki Willis (new)

Vicki Willis | 865 comments Yes, I agree about the index. I was like, huh... Unless you knew that was a Veal dish, there is no way to find it but to flip through.
Yes, definitely worth deducting a star, but super glad the food was good!


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