American Westerns discussion

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How many books do you read concurrently?

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message 1: by Edwin, Moderator (new)

Edwin (edmandu) | 226 comments Sometimes when I'm reading a paper book I'll also start another on an eReader, then even another on a tablet. Although workable, it seems like a bad practice somehow. Anyone else do this?


message 2: by Tim (new)

Tim (timi2u) | 66 comments I admit that I'm guilty of that in a big way, and am sure I have too many books going at the same time in paperbacks, inter-library loans, Kindle (Paperwhite/iPad/iPhone) & ePub books on Mac Pro desktop. Sounds like I need a support group now that I mention it...


message 3: by Larry (new)

Larry | 30 comments I do that quite often! Most of the time they're of various genres!


message 4: by Edwin, Moderator (new)

Edwin (edmandu) | 226 comments Various genres are probably a good idea. I once tried to read two hard-boiled detective novels at the same time and ended up having to restart both of them, one after the other.


message 5: by C. (new)

C. | 11 comments Two, since I do not have a light near my recliner which is the only place at home that I read, I read the dead tree books during the day, and at night I read Kindle books on my lighted Kindle Paperwhite. They are always different genres.


message 6: by Eunice (new)

Eunice Boeve | 34 comments I am a writer of western/historical fiction (mostly anyway) and so am often reading research material, so do "mix and match" books then, but for my regular "for pleasure" reading I can only do one book at a time. I want to connect with the characters, get a mental picture of the setting and become absorbed in the story. I love when the story comes alive for me and I think of the characters, etc. when I'm doing something else, and am eager to return to the story.


message 7: by HornFan2 (new)

HornFan2  (hornfan2) | 93 comments I probably will, make anyone that thinks they read too many books at any one given time. Look like they don't. I have 15 to 20 currently reading, combination of paperback/ebook, and an additional 4 that I keep picking up and putting down. I just juggle between books, when one slows, will switch to another and especially with ebooks, that's just makes it worst for me. Since with the Kindle App, I have a library at my finger tips.


message 8: by Bobby (new)

Bobby Underwood I've always got a few going, some in paperback or hardcover, some on Kindle, so I can read whatever I'm in the mood for. It helps especially with anthologies, where there are a lot of stories, because I can read one or two, then switch to a novel for a while, and read another story in the anthology when I feel like it.


message 9: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Burmesch | 6 comments I also always have a print book and and ebook going. I usually reserve my ebook for when I'm walking on the treadmill and my print for all other situations.


message 10: by Tim (new)

Tim (timi2u) | 66 comments ... and I just recently found out about the Wildside Press Megapacks, so it's only going to get worse. BTW, our good friend Edwin is moderator of a new Goodreads group called Wildside Press that lists a whole bunch of 'em, check it out and I'll bet you see something that catches your eye.


message 11: by Still (new)

Still (mantan) | 74 comments I only read one book at a time.

Recently, while reading The Pistoleer by James Carlos Blake I was forced to seek refuge in a graphic biography of Hunter S. Thompson.
I had to do that while deciding whether or not to finish the Blake novel.


message 12: by Richard (new)

Richard Lutman (goodreadscomrichard_lutman) | 16 comments I'm a binge reader and like to read one book at a time. Right now rereading Frederick Manfred.


message 13: by Lowell (new)

Lowell Ross | 30 comments Eunice wrote: "I am a writer of western/historical fiction (mostly anyway) and so am often reading research material, so do "mix and match" books then, but for my regular "for pleasure" reading I can only do one ..." very well said, I feel the same way about reading one book at a time
as i get absorbed in the book


message 14: by Michael (new)

Michael Finocchiaro (fino) | 6 comments For mr it depends. I'll start a book (and I am pretty obsessive about finishing books I start with only rare exceptions - see my review of J'Irai Craché Sur Vos Tombes" by Boris Vian) and if it starts to bore I'll pick up something shorter that really interests me. So, right now I am reading The Recognitions by Gaddis, but it has not inspired me so I have read 3 or 4 other books in parallel. When I am really engrossed in something (anything by Pynchon, Joyce, Proust, Roth, DFW, or Bellow), I dive in!


message 15: by J.R. (last edited Jan 28, 2017 03:19PM) (new)

J.R. | 46 comments Currently reading four--two fiction, two non-fiction. Usually reading more than one. I read on paper and Kindle.


message 16: by HornFan2 (new)

HornFan2  (hornfan2) | 93 comments Tim wrote: "... and I just recently found out about the Wildside Press Megapacks, so it's only going to get worse. BTW, our good friend Edwin is moderator of a new Goodreads group called Wildside Press that li..."

I've got a bunch of them, different genres, including several of the Western ones and really like the author megapacks.


message 17: by Edwin, Moderator (new)

Edwin (edmandu) | 226 comments I'm thinking that Eunice and Still might be right, and that reading more than one novel at a time subtly detracts from the enjoyment of all of them.

I'm going to try to avoid starting a novel until I finish one, which is not easy with so much good stuff to read on so many convenient devices.

And maybe non-fiction and short stories don't count.


message 18: by Eunice (new)

Eunice Boeve | 34 comments Edwin, I read one at a time for I want to be in the story, I want to feel the character's emotions, I want to hear what he/she hears, I want to smell it too, and I want to see what he/she sees. However, here I must add, not too much description, please. I think the reader cloaks description with his/her own visual experiences, and so too much description simply bogs down the process. For me, too, if the book is really good, if I'm into the characters, the story, I can't wait to get back to reading it, and so if I tried to read another book, especially fiction, it would make me crazy. :-)


message 19: by Bobby (new)

Bobby Underwood I think it can take you out of the story if it is too similar, or equally involved, but when I'm reading more than one book, they are usually night and day. I'm reading Ernest Gann's terrific Soldier of Fortune (found it in pristine hardback, with DJ at the Op Shop here the other day, and couldn't believe my good fortune) right now, but before I get immersed in it, I'll read one of the stories from a Stuart Palmer, Hildegarde Withers anthology. Or a chapter or two of something light and fun. It only distracts for me if the books are both very involved, so I shy away from that. I've sort of learned over the years as a reader what I can read together that doesn't lessen the pleasure of one book. I can always read a Spenser novel, for instance, while reading just about anything else, and it bothers me nil. Different strokes, but everyone should read in whatever manner that brings them the most enjoyment. That's what reading is about, in the end. :-)


message 20: by Tim (new)

Tim (timi2u) | 66 comments I guess with me it just depends, first of all it's not normal but my mind can keep track of a lot at one time, and I'm used to that in employment and as a musician. Something like an Ace Atkins written Spenser or Quinn Colson book I have trouble setting down at all and read usually same day, same with Sandford, Crais, or Lansdale's Hap and Leonard books, you get the idea. Others I pick up & set down, occasionally go back and start over, especially since I've started reviewing.
All that said, it's probably better and more enjoyable to read a single book at a time.
I'm monogamous in my marriage, not when it comes to music, books, and movies because I'm all over the place with them.


message 21: by HornFan2 (new)

HornFan2  (hornfan2) | 93 comments I do have books that I will read, without juggling them due to say like Atkins were he just keeps you flipping pages. I have found especially with the some of the books that are slower reads, just makes it easier to read to juggle books to finish them faster and I try to finish everything I start. If it's really bad, if I hit 50%, a few times I just considered it read verse struggling through it and just start something new.


message 22: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Whitt | 31 comments Usually I start my day at the breakfast table with a nonfiction book dealing with crime, history or adventure. At the end of the day or perhaps during lunch I'll be involved in a work of fiction from any number of genres. Variety is what appeals to me and I may be reading Elmer Kelton, James Lee Burke or something mainstream like John Grisham. In addition there are reference books always scattered around the house as I work on Facebook posts or my website blog. I'd be lost without my passion for reading.


message 23: by Eunice (new)

Eunice Boeve | 34 comments Anthony's post reminded me of Elmer Kelton. I loved his Good old Boys and Cloudy in the West, but not so much his other ones. Also a favorite, Louis LaMour's Down the Long Hills. John Grisham's first novel, the title temporarily lost in my brain, is my favorite of his, so far anyway.


message 24: by HornFan2 (new)

HornFan2  (hornfan2) | 93 comments Anthony wrote: "Usually I start my day at the breakfast table with a nonfiction book dealing with crime, history or adventure. At the end of the day or perhaps during lunch I'll be involved in a work of fiction fr..."

I started my Saturday with reading Johnstone AKA Charles G. West's
'Hang them Slowly reading 4 chapters, then catch up on e-mail/Goodreads, will switch to a Graphic Novel in the PM and end up reading Max Brand's 'The Man From Mustang' + a chapter or two from 'I Am Pilgrim'.


message 25: by Still (new)

Still (mantan) | 74 comments HornFan2 (Mike) wrote: "Anthony wrote: "Usually I start my day at the breakfast table with a nonfiction book dealing with crime, history or adventure. At the end of the day or perhaps during lunch I'll be involved in a wo..."

I just finished a W. C. Tuttle Hashknife Hartley & Sleepy Stevens novel that was so dense with plot twists involving multiple characters that I'd have been lost in the wilderness if I'd been trying to read an additional novel.

I envy everyone who can read more than one book at a time and be able to retain a sense of each book's atmosphere and characterizations.


message 26: by HornFan2 (new)

HornFan2  (hornfan2) | 93 comments Still wrote: "HornFan2 (Mike) wrote: "Anthony wrote: "Usually I start my day at the breakfast table with a nonfiction book dealing with crime, history or adventure. At the end of the day or perhaps during lunch ..."

I do have authors like Larry McMurtry, Zane Grey were I'll end up just reading their books nothing else. Then you have like authors like Peter Brandvold, Ace Atkins, J.F. Penn were they keep you flipping pages, are a fast read and don't slow down were I would want to start a new book.


message 27: by Steve (new)

Steve Chaput (stevec50) | 62 comments I usually have at least three going at any one time. I'll try to have one audiobook I can listen to while commuting, an ebook and one hardcover or paperback I'll keep by my nightstand. This doesn't count the graphic novels I'll read in a day or two.


message 28: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Whitt | 31 comments Eunice wrote: "Anthony's post reminded me of Elmer Kelton. I loved his Good old Boys and Cloudy in the West, but not so much his other ones. Also a favorite, Louis LaMour's Down the Long Hills. John Grisham's fir..."

"The Day the Cowboys Quit" was my first Kelton book. Made me a believer and strongly influenced my writing style. I enjoyed "Good Old Boys" and "The Time it Never Rained." I agree with you in that some of his other books have not lived up to his best work.


message 29: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Whitt | 31 comments Still wrote: "HornFan2 (Mike) wrote: "Anthony wrote: "Usually I start my day at the breakfast table with a nonfiction book dealing with crime, history or adventure. At the end of the day or perhaps during lunch ..."
I try to keep only one novel going at a time otherwise you're right about getting lost in the different story lines. Reading non-fiction is easier for me to keep separate. The early work of C.J. Box is good for a modern take on the old American West through the eyes of a game warden. Reading Trophy Hunt right now and it's different but interesting so far.


message 30: by John (new)

John Hansen | 2 comments I'm generally a "one book at a time reader." Most days I spend the first half of the day writing and then somewhere in the second half I'll try to find some time to read. The only time that I'll read two books concurrently is if one is non-fiction and the other fiction. However, hiking in the mountains is my passion (even now with all the snow) so quite often the number of books that I read is dictated by the amont of time that I have.


message 31: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 130 comments When I'm in a reading mood I usually try to read a paperback and an ebook. Two books seems like a reasonable amount to read at a time.


message 32: by KarenK2 (new)

KarenK2 (kaykaykay60) | 42 comments At least two .. one 'real ' book which is my daytime reading and another on Ebook which is my evening laying in bed reading.


message 33: by Ɪasa (new)

Ɪasa | 4 comments I am terrible about reading multiple books. Not only do I have a habit of just dropping books wherever I happen to be reading them, I also do a lot of 'secret' reading and hide books in places where I can read a few pages when i'm supposed to be doing something else. (I am my mama's caregiver and she gets anxious if I am not in site for very long). I normally am reading 7-10 books at a time but it has been know to creep up to 16 or 17


message 34: by Joseph (new)

Joseph (jsaltal) I usually have several books going at a time also.


message 35: by J.R. (new)

J.R. | 46 comments I always have several going. It's the only way to keep the TBR list under control.


message 36: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Burmesch | 6 comments Usually I have two, a paper book and an ebook I read while on my treadmill.


message 37: by Nancy (new)

Nancy | 3 comments I usually have 3; one nonfiction (inspirational or informational), one fiction, and one audiobook (for in the car). Except for the audiobook, I prefer old-fashioned physical books.


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