Science Fiction & Fantasy Award Winning Book Group discussion

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Award Discussion > Hugo Award Discussion

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message 1: by Joe (new)

Joe (finalblowjoe) | 264 comments Mod
The title says it all. Discussion on the Hugo Awards; which started in 1953.


message 2: by Jon (new)

Jon | 366 comments Mod
The deadline for this year's Hugo nominations is coming up. March 17th at 11:59 PM where I live (Pacific Standard Time). I missed the nomination phase last year because of my penchant for procrastination.

Also in case anyone is interested you can vote now for the Locus Awards. You don't have to be a subscriber to the magazine to vote, but subscribers votes will count for double.

Has anyone nominated yet?


message 3: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
I haven't nominated because I just don't read enough new fiction to feel that I have a good overview of the genre - especially short fiction where I've read pretty much nothing.

I have heard people say that you should vote even if you haven't read very widely, because the wisdom of crowds will work. If I vote for the best new stuff I've read, someone else will vote for the best new stuff I haven't read.

The other thing with the Hugos is that some of the categories are weird. I've read some of the history of how it all came about, but even so, I'm never going to have an opinion on 'Best Editor' and can never remember the difference between fan work, semi-pro work and 'real' work.


Rachel (Kalanadi) (kalanadi) Nick wrote: "The other thing with the Hugos is that some of the categories are weird. I've read some of the history of how it all came about, but even so, I'm never going to have an opinion on 'Best Editor' and can never remember the difference between fan work, semi-pro work and 'real' work. "

I've nominated and voted since 2014, and STILL don't understand fan writer / fan artist / semiprozine / fanzine. Last year I did tons of work to nominate in every category, but this year I let myself ignore some categories.

Having been to WorldCon now, fan categories make sense because fandom and its history is HUGE there. Actually seeing it vs. hearing about it online was an eye-opener. But I'm not tapped into that enough to have an informed opinion.

Got my noms in for this year! I did it early just so I wouldn't forget the deadline. I'd better look up the Locus deadline too... haven't even looked at their poll yet.


message 5: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Rachel (Kalanadi) wrote: "Got my noms in for this year! I did it early just so I wouldn't forget the deadline."

Congrats! Are you attending this year? I was seriously thinking about going while it's in Europe (coz who knows when it'll be back), but it ended up clashing with work commitments :(

I will probably by the supporting membership and vote if the shortlists aren't complete dross.


Rachel (Kalanadi) (kalanadi) Nick wrote: "Are you attending this year? I was seriously thinking about going while it..."

Not this year, a trip to Finland was a bit too much! But San Jose in 2018, cross fingers.

SP/RP factions are either really quiet this year, or blatantly ignored, and I can only hope that's a good sign. I am tired of that crap, but it won't stop me from paying every year to "No Award" their idiocy as long as it lasts :-D


message 7: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Yup, I think it is all blowing over now mostly. But I also think Beale is a grudge-holder so I won't be surprised if he continues to attempt to ruin things, one way or another. Whether he has any effect is a different matter!


message 8: by Sofie (new)

Sofie (sostorm) | 5 comments I did some nominations but am mostly excited for the nominations list. I haven't read a ton this year but as I'll be attending worldcon this year I intend to read and vote for at least some of the categories.


message 9: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Sofie wrote: "I did some nominations but am mostly excited for the nominations list.."

I always get excited for the nominations list as well. It's pretty much all the short fiction I read in SF.


message 10: by Jon (new)

Jon | 366 comments Mod
Got my nominations done on Thursday. I nominated in five categories but I only filled the bracket in the Best Novel category. When do they usually post the short list?

I haven't heard any SP/RP talk this year but like Rachel (Kalanadi) I'll pay up again to No Award them where applicable.

I live in southern California so I might try to get to Worldcon 76 in San Jose next year. I've never been to one before so that would be exciting!


message 11: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Jon wrote: " When do they usually post the short list?"

The website says 'April',but not an exact date. So I'm guessing they're leaving themselves a little wiggle room in case they get delayed. It's tough getting stuff out on a deadline when everyone's a volunteer.


message 12: by Joe (new)

Joe (finalblowjoe) | 264 comments Mod
So, the short list has now been anounced. It can be found here, among many other places: http://www.thehugoawards.org/hugo-his...
What are peoples opinions on it so far? Any interesting surprises or weird appearances?

I've only read one of the best novels but have heard many opinions and thoughts about the other five.

With Novellas I've read half of them; The Ballad Of Black Tom only last week in fact.

I've read all five of the Novelettes (not counting the Alien Stripper one as that's just a joke that got through).

Best Short story I'm amazed that I've read them all. I can't choose between them as I liked them all equally.

All the other categories I'm very spotty with overall. There's odd things here and there I know but not enough to choose between anything.


message 13: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Oh exciting!

When it comes to the novels, I'm excited to see Too Like the Lightning because I've heard good things. Deeply disappointed that I will be reading another Becky Chambers novel, since the first was so bad!

I haven't read any of the shorter fiction, but I recognise a lot of the names, so I suspect I'm going to enjoy reading them.

I spen years looking forward to the day when Best Dramatic Presentation Short Form woudl no longer be the 'Doctor Who' award, but I'm kind of sad to see that it's well on it's way to becoming the 'Game of Thrones' award. Oh well, they are popular. I'm glad to see that Black mirror finally has a nomination.


Rachel (Kalanadi) (kalanadi) Nick - I am thrilled Too Like the Lightning made the list too! I was put out that Locus didn't include it in their recommended reading list (for debut novel). Clearly a bunch of people loved it though!

As for the 2017 shortlist overall...

Wow. Oh wow. 43 of my nominations made the shortlist. I can hardly believe it. Ranking my votes in almost every category is going to be tough. I've read about 75% of the fiction and Best Related Work categories. Like Joe, I'm very happy I've read all the works in Best Short Story (and Best Novelette), except for the puppy trash. That's amazing considering how fractured and varied the short fiction market is.

Anybody have thoughts on the inaugural Best Series category? I thought older series would dominate, but I'm pleasantly surprised. I nominated The Expanse, which I'm caught up on (as well as the Vorkosigan Saga). My only disappointment is that Fractured Europe didn't make it.


message 15: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
A lot of the Best Series stuff comes under the heading of: 'Looks good, I've been meaning to get round to it.'

I've read the first of The Craft Sequence and the first of the Vorkosigan Series, and both of them I enjoyed but didn't prioritise (they both seem to me like the sort of thing I would eat up if it were at the library, but I don't need to own a copy).

The only Seanan McGuire book I've tried to read was Parasite, written under the pen name Mira Grant. It was so awful that I've sworn off all her other work. Perhaps, I should give her another go.

And yes, Fractured Europe was higher up my to-read list than anything that made the short list!


Rachel (Kalanadi) (kalanadi) Nick wrote: "The only Seanan McGuire book I've tried to read was Parasite, written under the pen name Mira Grant. It was so awful that I've sworn off all her other work. Perhaps, I should give her another go."

I disliked Parasite too. I can say some of her short fiction is MUCH better and Every Heart a Doorway was nothing like Parasite. Better written, better story. Though I think it's becoming clear that Every Heart's appeal to many people is its representation, rather than a particularly fantastic plot.


message 17: by Joe (new)

Joe (finalblowjoe) | 264 comments Mod
Like Rachel I expected best series to be older ongoing series but happy to see it different from that. I couldn't help smiling when I saw the vorkosigan saga there as I was reading one of them right before seeing the shortlist.

Nick, it won't be the Game of Thrones awards much longer as they've nearly finished making them all now I believe; maybe 2 years at most left.


message 18: by Jon (new)

Jon | 366 comments Mod
I've read five of the six in the Best Novel category (nominated three of them) so I feel pretty good there. As far as the short fiction goes I've only read The Ballad of Black Tom which I really liked. I'd like to read everything else in those three categories but we'll see. If I get to all of the novellas I'd be pretty happy.

I'm pretty happy with the Best Series category. I've read at least the first novel in each one and in four of them I've read at least the first three. I was pleasantly surprised to see the Peter Grant/Rivers of London series in there. I nominated it but I didn't think that an urban fantasy series had a chance in heck of making it. Really disappointed that the Fractured Europe series didn't make it. That's probably my favorite current ongoing series. Not sure how this category works as it goes on though. Is it just going to end up as the same series being shortlisted each year, kind of like Nick's new 'Game of Thrones Award'? Put out a new book and you can keep winning the award? Or once a series wins it can no longer be nominated?


message 19: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
I've had a look and I found this definition on Tor:

'An eligible work for this special award is a multi-volume science fiction or fantasy story, unified by elements such as plot, characters, setting, and presentation, which has appeared in at least three volumes consisting of a total of at least 240,000 words by the close of the calendar year 2016, at least one volume of which was published in 2016.'

That does sound like as long as the author keeps producing one book a year the same series could win year after year, doesn't it? I hope if they decide to keep the award they put in some kind of rule about no repeat wins. Ideally, it would just be for finished series, but then who gets to decide if a series is finished?
I would've voted for Game of Thrones after book 3, but I'd never vote for it now since the last book was such a turgid mess. You really have to see a whole series to judge it.


message 20: by Sofie (new)

Sofie (sostorm) | 5 comments Random thoughts, I guess, since the nominations lists is so all over the place. I'm generally happy for the nominees. I look forward to reading/watching them etc.

I did sincerely enjoy Becky Chambers last story as a very cosy sci-fi and had planned on reading her first. I haven't yet gotten around to the Broken Earth books yet so I'll see how I'll do with that one.

My absolute favourite short story of them all was "A Fist of Permutations in Lightning and Wildflowers", maybe because I've lost someone close to me this last year and it just tore through my heart as a storm.

I'm very excited to see a music album nominated for dramatic presentation. Variety in the SF scene is always good.

I must have read the qualifying criterias for best series wrong, since I (when I nominated) thought it had to be a series which was finalised in 2016. It made me a bit giddy to see Rivers of London up there, they're always fun to read even if I don't necessarily think it's the best series out there.

I'm pretty excited about the Related Works categories as well - a lot of stuff there I've been meaning to read.

Semiprozine will be really hard for me, I love a lot of those. I'm very glad that the Booksmugglers got a nominations, they are a blog I pretty much check daily. I think the same goes for fanzine, a lot of good stuff there.

For the books I did put together https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/110637.2017_Hugo_Awards_Finalists>a goodreads list since the one that already existed didn't have the related works and suggested that no one else should add anything. I need this to keep track for my votes.


message 21: by Joe (new)

Joe (finalblowjoe) | 264 comments Mod
The Hugo awards are being announced as I'm writing this. Will be interesting to see the results soon.


message 22: by Jon (new)

Jon | 366 comments Mod
The 2019 Hugo Award Finalists were announced back in early April

Best Novel
The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal
Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers
Revenant Gun by Yoon Ha Lee
Space Opera by Catherynne M Valente
Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik
Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse

I found the full list of finalists on Tor.com in a post from Tuesday, April 2, 2019.


message 23: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
No hard SF, here. :(

I am a little sad that the Hugos seem to be drifting towards fantasy or space fantasy. Alastair Reynolds and Peter Watts were both eligible this year, and have been cruelly overlooked!

the popularity of Becky Chambers just baffles me! Those books are so bad - terrible writing and saccharine moralizing. Blurgh!

I really enjoyed the first of Yoon Ha Lee's series though, I suspect this will encourage me to finally get around to reading the whole trilogy.


message 24: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Hugo winners announced at Tor.com.

Marie Robinette Kowal's The Calculating Stars has won this as well as the Nebula!

Becky Chambers Wayfarers got best series, which makes me despair. Those books were soooo bad.


message 25: by Sophie (new)

Sophie (romeowyn) Nick wrote: "Hugo winners announced at Tor.com.

Marie Robinette Kowal's The Calculating Stars has won this as well as the Nebula!

Becky Chambers Wayfarers got best series, which makes me despair. Those books ..."


Both those books are currently sitting on my TBR shelf... It's a sign I have to get to it.
You're the first person I've heard/read saying they didn't like Becky Chambers ! Could you tell what rubbed you the wrong way ?


message 26: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
So, I only read the first two - maybe the third is great? I seem to remember the 2nd being better than the 1st, but it was largely forgettable.

Main reasons I hated the 1st one:

- Overall just incredibly bad writing on every level: the characters are flat, the dialogue is stilted, it's incredibly slow, there is no plot, there is no action, the world-building is bad with a ton of gaping holes, there is not even any elegance or style in the prose.

- Really aggravating moralising - every chapter was like a little short story where the characters would lecture each other about the moral lesson of the chapter. If you enjoy being beaten over the head with progressive morals then you will love this book.

- The bad writing and the bad moralising combined to make this book actively offensive to me because there were more than a few incidents where there characters were all patting each other on the back for being Good People - but they were only able to take the actions they did because they live in a totally implausible Candy Land (sorry if that's vague but I don't want to spoil it for you!)


message 27: by Joe (new)

Joe (finalblowjoe) | 264 comments Mod
I returned today from the Dublin WorldCon and watched the Hugo ceremony live. Like 2018 it was a fantastic experience and one I'd recommend if you're able to make it one year.

I find it strange that I did have stronger opinions on the Hugo awards in particular but now I've been to two in a row, and indeed plan to make it to many more, I've become fairly ambivilant to who wins. I still have favourites but the experience of being there overrode any particular interest in an individual category.

Also as I plan to try to get to as many WorldCon's as possible from now on if anyone else attends it let me know and we can say hello.

Jeannette Ng's acceptance speech was my favourite


message 28: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Joe, I'm so glad that you had a good time!

I haven't been to a WorldCon since London 2014. I keep telling myself I'll go when it's back in Europe but then 2017 it clashed with work and 2019 I was broke! Maybe the stars will finally align in 2022?

Interesting that greater involvement makes you more ambivalent - I guess once you get involved then the old proverb takes hold: 'It's the taking part that counts!'


message 29: by Jon (new)

Jon | 366 comments Mod
It looks like Redshirts, 2013 Hugo and Locus Award winner, is a free download for those who subscribe to the Tor.com newsletter. The offer expires Friday the 20th.


message 30: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Only North Americans are eligible. 😭


message 31: by Jon (new)

Jon | 366 comments Mod
The 2020 Hugo Award Finalists were announced on Tuesday, April 7th.

Best Novel
The City in the Middle of the Night
Gideon the Ninth
The Light Brigade
A Memory Called Empire
Middlegame
The Ten Thousand Doors of January

The Tor.com website has the announcement along with the complete list of finalists.

I've read and enjoyed The Light Brigade and A Memory Called Empire. I liked TLB a little better but then I tend to like Kameron Hurley's stuff so no surprise there. I have Gideon the Ninth on hold through my library but it will be weeks before I see it. Not really interested in the other three for various reasons.


message 32: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Gideon the Ninth looks absolutely mental - there's some classic fantasy naming conventions going on: 'Harrowhark Nonagesimus, Reverend Daughter of the Ninth House and bone witch extraordinaire'! 😄 I would've thought that was so Badass when I was 15.

The City in the Middle of the Night looks like it ought to be good, and Charlie Jane Anders is a big name, but so many of my friends have given it 1 or 2 star ratings, so I'm not sure what to expect.

Kameron Hurley is pretty good. I thought God's War started strong and then tailed off, but it had a lot of interesting ideas.

I don't understand the appeal of Seanan McGuire's work at all - but it's been a while since I've tried, so maybe it's time to try again...


message 33: by Joe (new)

Joe (finalblowjoe) | 264 comments Mod
Personally this is not the most exciting of shortlists. I haven't read any yet and only have A Memory Called Empire planned for the near future.
I liked God's War but despite liking it at the time it didn't capture my interest enough to make me read the sequels straight away, and still haven't done so to this day.


message 34: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Yeah, I agree Joe, it's not hugely exciting. Maybe I haven't been paying attention, but it feels like it wasn't an exciting year for SF. I'm having a hard time thinking of anything that was particuarly brilliant?


message 35: by Joe (new)

Joe (finalblowjoe) | 264 comments Mod
I've been less up to date with new releases in the last year due to travel but suspect that will not apply this year. Unsure how current events will affect release dates in publishing.


message 36: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Joe wrote: " Unsure how current events will affect release dates in publishing."

Oh, I hadn't thought of that! I've seen a few authors I follow who have released something this year being melancholy that their sales are low and they can't do any IRL promotions. I suppose there will be a quiet patch when nothing gets released because everyone's been stuck at home.
If it all gets pushed back could make 2021 a busy year?


message 37: by Joe (new)

Joe (finalblowjoe) | 264 comments Mod
2021 will have to have a lot of releases reshuffled to not overlap each other which could have interesting effects on awards.

The New Zealand WorldCon in July was recently cancelled and is going entirely digital. I had everything booked for it but still plan on 2021 in Washington D.C.


message 38: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Joe wrote: "The New Zealand WorldCon in July was recently cancelled and is going entirely digital. I had everything booked for it but still plan on 2021 in Washington D.C."

Bummer! Poor Kiwis. I hope the digital con goes well, but it's hard to see how it can be anything other than a let down.


message 39: by Jon (new)

Jon | 366 comments Mod
So I finished Gideon the Ninth. The YA feel didn't bother me near as much as I was afraid it would. The mystery trope at the heart of the story is one of my favorites and I enjoyed the world building although to be honest there wasn't a lot of it. I guess my problem with this was the characters. While they didn't annoy me like I have heard others say, I just didn't connect with any of them. This left me feeling a bit removed from the action and tension. The last encounter did pique my interest so I might pick up the sequel.

So far The Light Brigade has a slight lead over A Memory Called Empire for my vote. Not sure if I'll pick up any of the other three. Maybe I'll see if I can get them from the library so I can easily drop if they don't work for me.


message 40: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Hmm, when I think of all the other YA adventures that I've read because they were nominated for Hugo awards, I feel like I might give Gideon the Ninth a miss. It's not that I didn't enjoy books like The Goblin Emperor or Redshirts, it's just that they're not hugely interesting.

Unless it wins of course! Then I will be honour-bound to read it!


message 41: by Lori (new)

Lori (loriramey) | 2 comments Here to say I loved Gideon the Ninth -- I'm not really a fan of YA fiction, so it was definitely the story and the "mood" and the overall feel of the book that won me over. I just love Gideon's character. I know people who, if dumped into a similar space fantasy world, would react in similar ways, and I laughed out loud several times.


message 42: by Lori (last edited May 25, 2020 08:35AM) (new)

Lori (loriramey) | 2 comments On the other hand, I feel like two of the current Hugo nominees are a real swing and a miss for me:
The Ten Thousand Doors of January and The City in the Middle of the Night are both pushing their viewpoint really hard, to the point of being preachy. I'm at the ⅓ point in both books and have set them aside to skim-read to the finish later (only because they're on the ballot; I would abandon them completely if I weren't voting).

Look, the Sad Puppies crowd is just plain wrong and I am as much against sexism in sci-fi as anywhere. I like seeing new voices represented on the Hugo nominee list. But I'm *not* in favor of pushing books just because people like their social or political viewpoint, even if I agree with the theme.

If I wanted a sermon, I'd go to church. I love reading good essays. Put the "on the nose" social commentary in non-fiction works. Is subtlety dead in sci-fi right now? lol

On to A Memory Called Empire, which I'm already enjoying a lot more.


message 43: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Lori wrote: "Here to say I loved Gideon the Ninth."

I'm encouraged that you're not much of a YA reader and still enjoyed it - now I'm swinging back towards giving it a go. At this rate, I may never make up my mind. :D

I couldn't agree with you more about the message-fic. It's fine for a book to reflect cultural or political assumptions, but preachy is a dead bore. And there does seem to be a lot of it about at the moment.


message 44: by Banshee (new)

Banshee (bansheethecat) | 3 comments Lori wrote: "I like seeing new voices represented on the Hugo nominee list. But I'm *not* in favor of pushing books just because people like their social or political viewpoint, even if I agree with the theme. "

So true! I enjoy social justice themes as long as they are subtle and well-incorporated into a strong plot with good characters. But then there are some books that focus on social justice so much that they forget to be a good novel. If you want to publish an essay, publish an essay instead of disguising it as fiction. The Ten Thousand Doors of January might be just a little bit guilty of that, but the I personally enjoyed the novel enough that I didn't mind that.

Nick wrote: "I'm encouraged that you're not much of a YA reader and still enjoyed it - now I'm swinging back towards giving it a go.."

I tend to have mixed feelings towards YA as well and usually end up giving it middle of the road rating, and yet I also absolutely loved Gideon the Ninth I didn't get any YA vibes from it at all. But a fair warning: it's a hate it or love it type of book.


message 45: by Jon (new)

Jon | 366 comments Mod
Banshee wrote: . . . I also absolutely loved Gideon the Ninth I didn't get any YA vibes from it at all.

To be fair I don't think it's being sold as YA and I probably shouldn't have referred to it as YA. The main protagonists are young (teenagers I think?) and that's what made me think of it that way. I read little to no fiction that is sold as YA so I wouldn't even know where to draw the lines.

Lori wrote: On the other hand, I feel like two of the current Hugo nominees are a real swing and a miss for me:
The Ten Thousand Doors of January and The City in the Middle of the Night are both pushing their viewpoint really hard, . . .


Banshee wrote: The Ten Thousand Doors of January might be just a little bit guilty of that, but the I personally enjoyed the novel enough that I didn't mind that.

So The City in the Middle of the Night isn't available from my library and All the Birds in the Sky was a big miss for me so I'll probably skip it.

I do have The Ten Thousand Doors of January on hold at the library. Looks like I won't see it for about 8 weeks. My worry is that I've heard it described in terms of 'literature' and
'magical realism'. I tend to stay away from books described that way based on past experiences.

Any thoughts from those of you that have read these?


I have to admit that message-fic is hit or miss with me. Sometimes I'll put a book down if I feel it's too heavy handed while at other times it won't bother me at all.


message 46: by Banshee (new)

Banshee (bansheethecat) | 3 comments Jon wrote: "I do have The Ten Thousand Doors of January on hold at the library. Looks like I won't see it for about 8 weeks. My worry is that I've heard it described in terms of 'literature' and 'magical realism'. I tend to stay away from books described that way based on past experiences. "

The line between pure fantasy and magical realism is arbitrary and I wouldn't dare to categorise it firmly in only one of those. The best way to describe the novel is portal fantasy. Think Narnia and Wayward Children series.
When it comes to describing the novel as "literary fiction", well, it certainly has very poetic language. I thought it was beautiful and one of its biggest strengths, but for some other reviewers it's too purple. So it's a matter of preference.
It's also a bit slow at times and low on action. It focuses a lot on ideas instead.


message 47: by Jon (new)

Jon | 366 comments Mod
The Hugo Award winners were announced on Saturday, Aug 1st (Friday, July 31st in my time zone).

Best Novel went to A Memory Called Empire.

I thought it was a good book so I'm pretty happy with the win. I was surprised when I went back and looked at my review that I rated it three stars. In my mind now it's much closer to a four star. The pacing was a little slow for me but that was really the only negative.


message 48: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
I haven't read it but I was very put off by this review.

Political drama which fails at politics doesn't sound very appealing - and it's how I felt about The Goblin Emperor. It wasn't a bad book, exactly, it just felt like none of the characters really understood the concept of power.


message 49: by Sofie (new)

Sofie (sostorm) | 5 comments I thought this was much better than the Goblin Emperor. I agree that the romance came out of nowhere but I did feel there were motivations for the characters actions. The treatment of language and culture were really interesting. But the best sci-fi I've read but pretty good.


message 50: by Nick (new)

Nick Imrie (nickimrie) | 365 comments Mod
Sofie wrote: "I thought this was much better than the Goblin Emperor."

Ooh, that's encouraging!


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