Audiobooks discussion

240 views
Non Fiction Book Lovers Unite

Comments Showing 1-46 of 46 (46 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Karan (new)

Karan | 8 comments What are some great non fiction books you are currently reading or have recently finished? I would love to hear and discuss them as i too have read dozens! :)


message 2: by Peg (new)

Peg | 18 comments Pit Bull: The Battle over an American Icon by Bronwen Dickey. I enjoyed the book and was happy to pick up the audio as a Daily Deal just a few days ago!


message 3: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3670 comments My #1 nonfiction audio is superbly narrated by one of our contributing narrator members, Karen White: Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea. I mentioned the title in chatting with a couple of librarians recently, and their eyes lit up "Oh YES!"

Leah Remini's memoir of Scientology Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology is one better heard in her own voice than in print I'd say.


message 4: by Robin P (new)

Robin P | 1063 comments The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics is excellent. I don't read much nonfiction but this was more amazing than fiction. If you like history, John Quincy Adams was surprisingly relevant. The political conflicts were a lot like today. And The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo is another dramatic story.


message 5: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 1522 comments I finished listening to What Stands in a Storm: Three Days in the Worst Superstorm to Hit the South's Tornado Alley a couple weeks ago - I actually teared up during portions of it! (who does that in non-fiction!!!!)


message 6: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments I love non-fiction. Often these are more gripping than fiction. Stalin's Daughter: The Extraordinary and Tumultuous Life of Svetlana Alliluyeva or Sophia: Princess, Suffragette, Revolutionary or Deep South: Four Seasons on Back Roads or....... I could go on and on. Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. is very good. Lindbergh and Gift from the Sea are fun to read together.

John, I agree with the one you mention on North Korea. I read the paper version years ago.

Robin, you mention John Adams. I agree there too, but in fact anything by David McCullough is a sure bet.

Non-fiction need not be dry or bring. Some are though, but then you just move on. Just as with fiction!


message 7: by Sophie (new)

Sophie (sophiesworld) | 11 comments I may read Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea which was mentioned at some point but I think it will be too upsetting for me.

I've been listening to Modern Romance which is a factual book and has a few interesting statistics/titbits.

I like fiction and non fiction. I like spiritual books and true travel stories.


message 8: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 316 comments Has anyone else tried the Stanford neurobiologist Robert Sapolsky's books or Great Courses? I gave 4 or 5 stars to all but one of his books. He narrates very well.


message 9: by MissSusie (new)

MissSusie | 1951 comments The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot narrated by, Cassandra Campbell & Bahni Turpin

Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson narrated by, Scott Brick

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah

Between Breaths: A Memoir of Panic and Addiction by Elizabeth Vargas

The Sound of Gravel: A Memoir by Ruth Wariner

Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark and the Spending of a Great American Fortune by Bill Dedman & Paul Clark Newell Jr., narrated by, Kimberly Farr


message 10: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3670 comments Sophie wrote: "I like spiritual books and true travel stories.
"


Try the travel stories of Burmese writer Ma Thanegi. I don't think I'd like her memoir of being a political prisoner, but these are amazing! (digression as they aren't audio)


message 12: by Karan (new)

Karan | 8 comments Any business minds in here? I have read dozens of books on startups and business marketing and would love to hear what you guys think of the best ones for this topic?

I have compiled a very unique list myself of my top 3. And thats right it doesnt have Zero to One... shocker.

Can check my 3 here below:) Would love to get your thoughts and and questions!

http://www.bestaudiobooks.co/single-p...


message 13: by Joy (new)

Joy (audioaddict1234) | -7 comments I read business/management/leadership books, but not really entrepreneur stuff. I also like behavioral economics.

A recent listen was Work Rules by Laszlo Bock of Google.


message 14: by Karan (new)

Karan | 8 comments Joy wrote: "I read business/management/leadership books, but not really entrepreneur stuff. I also like behavioral economics.

A recent listen was Work Rules by Laszlo Bock of Google."


Can you recommend any management or leadership books which stood out to you?


message 15: by Joy (new)

Joy (audioaddict1234) | -7 comments Karan, It's Your Ship by Capt Michael Abrashoff is especially well done and practical.


message 16: by Sophie (new)

Sophie (sophiesworld) | 11 comments Thank you for your recommendations John (not sure how to tag you).
Think I've got the Japan book on my to-read list and I've read some of Robert McFarlane's books (as in part of his books), very well written and I like them.
Unfortunately some of the best books in my opinion, or ones I've enjoyed most, don't appear to be in audio format. Maybe because they are not as popular or well known.


message 17: by Karan (new)

Karan | 8 comments Joy wrote: "Karan, It's Your Ship by Capt Michael Abrashoff is especially well done and practical."

Thanks Joy! I'll be sure to check it out


message 18: by Karan (new)

Karan | 8 comments Any Earl Nightingale and Napoleon Hill fans?

I believe the misuse, misunderstanding or lack of any understanding at all, and negligence of the human mind is one of the greatest tragedies of our human experience on this spinning planet.

As T.E Lawrence said,

"All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible. "

This article will be of great service to you, check it out from the link below :)

3 Life-Changing Audiobooks that Reveal the Power of the Human Mind

http://www.bestaudiobooks.co/single-p...


message 19: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3670 comments A nonfiction title that may resonate with group members: My Invented Country : A Nostalgic Journey Through Chile.


message 20: by ms.petra (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) | 16 comments I just downloaded Leah Remini on my Overdrive app.


message 21: by ms.petra (new)

ms.petra (mspetra) | 16 comments I just finished the Elon Musk book. I loved When Breath Becomes Air. I listen to a little of everything.


message 22: by Julieanne (new)

Julieanne Baker (pinkjulip) | 1 comments I'm a huge fan of biographies read by the author.

"Scrappy Little Nobody" by Anna Kendrick -- This was hilarious to listen to... I know it got some bad reviews but I'm convinced that those people read the book and didn't listen to it. She was a little dry in the beginning but I more often than not found myself laughing out loud in my car.

"Yes Please" by Amy Pohler -- I'm a huge Parks and Rec fan... but this book also had so many good messages and quotes in it. I actually paused the book when she got to a part where she talked about writing to her younger self and things that she'd want her to know... one being that "No is a complete sentence".... and as a perpetual appologizer... it just hit me hard. I may be biased... but LOVED this. And come on, comedians reading their own bios is just awesome ^_^

As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride by Carry Elwes -- This is the book that actually got me hooked on audio books. I LOVE the movie and getting to listen to Carry speak for hours on end was enjoyable to say the least. His stories about Andre the Giant were pretty funny!

The book I'm currently listening to is "Gumption" by Nick Offerman -- Now admittedly, I'm listening to this more because I love Nick Offerman and less because I'm interested in history BUT I'm still enjoying it ^_^ If anything, it's made me want to listen to it with the hard copy on my lap so that I can make note of all of the vocab he uses that I'm unfamiliar with..... it's hard to look up words while you're driving haha.


message 23: by Megan (new)

Megan (altmegan) I listened to Forensics: What Bugs, Burns, Prints, DNA and More Tell Us About Crime earlier this year and really enjoyed it. Content and narration were both very good!


message 24: by Megan (new)

Megan (altmegan) Margaret wrote: "Has anyone else tried the Stanford neurobiologist Robert Sapolsky's books or Great Courses? I gave 4 or 5 stars to all but one of his books. He narrates very well."

I have not, but I love reading about science and the brain. Do you have any specific favorites you would recommend to try first?


message 25: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) | 196 comments Julieanne wrote: "As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride..."

I read that - and then when I saw it in audio, I had to get it again. I'm saving it for a rainy day.

I think the two best non-fiction experiences I have had have been two presidential bios: Ron Chernow's [[book:Alexander Hamilton|16130] and Candice Millard's Destiny of the Republic. They were both fascinating, and beautifully narrated.


message 26: by Grumpus, Hearing aide (new)

Grumpus | 474 comments Tracey wrote: "I think the two best non-fiction experiences I have had have been two presidential bios: Ron Chernow's [[book:Alexander Hamilton|16130] and Candice Millard's Destiny of the Republic. They were both fascinating, and beautifully narrated."

No argument here--fascinating and beautifully narrated is well said.


message 27: by Christine (new)

Christine | 23 comments I finished listening to Cleopatra: A Life and throughly enjoyed it.


message 28: by Anne ✨ (new)

Anne ✨ Finds Joy (annefindsjoy) | 14 comments Julieanne wrote: "I'm a huge fan of biographies read by the author.

"Scrappy Little Nobody" by Anna Kendrick -- This was hilarious to listen to... I know it got some bad reviews but I'm convinced that those people..."


Agreed - I thought it was really funny, and yes of course to really appreciate it you have to listen to her deliver her own lines of humor - I love her wit!


message 29: by Anne ✨ (new)

Anne ✨ Finds Joy (annefindsjoy) | 14 comments Julieanne wrote: "I'm a huge fan of biographies read by the author.

"As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride by Carry Elwes -- This is the book that actually got me hooked on audio books. I LOVE the movie and getting to listen to Carry speak for hours on end was enjoyable to say the least. His stories about Andre the Giant were pretty funny!."


I have been wanting to get to this one, thanks for reminding me, I need to bump it up the list!!


message 30: by John, Moderator (last edited Jan 31, 2020 06:01PM) (new)

John | 3670 comments These are a couple of titles from the past year I thought I might pass on...

The Diary of a Bookseller, kind of a given that a book about running a Bookshop would be attractive to most serious readers. However, I think this one worked out quite well as an audiobook. Was sorry when it finally came to an end, thinking that I might likely give it another listen in the future, which is quite uncommon.

Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen, story of the authors lifetime love of all things Greek. I think it was a wise choice on my part to listen to the audio rather than read the print edition. Though it may have taken some getting used to until I was fully engaged, I came away feeling that she truly succeeded in conveying her passionate interest.


message 31: by Pamela (new)

Pamela | 76 comments I could heartily recommend to this group: Volume Control: Hearing in a Deafening World by David Owen. It is all about the ears! It is a narrative non-fiction, journalism type book, we get the author's own experience with his ears and tinnitus. While the book does not go into far depth of any one topic, excepting tinnitus, it does cover many aspects of the ears.


message 32: by Anne ✨ (new)

Anne ✨ Finds Joy (annefindsjoy) | 14 comments Pamela wrote: "I could heartily recommend to this group: Volume Control: Hearing in a Deafening World by David Owen. It is all about the ears! It is a narrative non-fiction, journalism type book, ..."

thanks for highlighting, this sounds interesting... adding to my TBR


message 34: by Kulbir (new)

Kulbir | 1 comments I am struggling with finishing my projects and to do lists, so i thought about approaching some ideas in books. Currently reading Finsish what you start, hope it helps.


message 35: by Fran (last edited Mar 28, 2020 05:46AM) (new)

Fran Wilkins | 543 comments I agree with a lot of the recommendations. Especially anything by Chernow and of course Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea.

I like Simon Winchester and Erik Larson's contributions to nonfiction as well.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration
I recently listened to The Feather Thief and The Library Book. Both were unexpectedly good. Who knew Victorian fly tying or the burning of the L.A. Central Libary (and a history of the library) would be so interesting.
I'll also add in Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland if you are at all interested in the politics of Northern Ireland and Elephant Company: The Inspiring Story of an Unlikely Hero and the Animals Who Helped Him Save Lives in World War II.

I have to say I always gravitated toward fiction. When I was a teenager and a young adult my family put the 'fun' in dys'fun'ctional so I was always looking to escape reality. In recent years and because of this group I've really expanded my reading/listening of nonfiction.


message 36: by Fran (new)

Fran Wilkins | 543 comments I'm adding in two more. If you are at all concerned about what you eat try Eating Animals. It's well researched and fact checked. Red Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man's Fight for Justice - absolutely outstanding.


message 38: by Christine (last edited Apr 08, 2020 10:08AM) (new)

Christine | 23 comments This lockdown with all the kiddies at home so listening to The Enchanted Hour The Miraculous Power of Reading Aloud in the Age of Distraction by Meghan Cox Gurdon . The Enchanted Hour: The Miraculous Power of Reading Aloud in the Age of Distraction


message 40: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie | 1121 comments Does anybody know the name of a good audibook on the Celts. I believe there are several of us interested.


message 41: by Squeeze (new)

Squeeze | 6 comments Here's another vote for anything by Simon Winchester. He reads his own books and has an obvious passion for the material. He is also the king of the backstory, which some may not like but I do.

For example, in his book Krakatoa: The Day The World Exploded, he talks about the fall of the Roman Empire, the pepper trade, how gas lamps work, and all about Lloyd's Of London, to name just a few things that might seem to be off-topic but aren't.

If I had to choose a favorite of his, I think it would be Atlantic: Great Sea Battles, Heroic Discoveries, Titanic Storms, and a Vast Ocean of a Million Stories.

He also wrote The Professor And The Madman, which some may know from the 2019 movie of the same name starring Mel Gibson and Sean Penn. The complete title of the book is The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary. It was originally published in England with the title The Surgeon of Crowthorne: A Tale of Murder, Madness and the Love of Words.


message 42: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3670 comments I hated his book on Korea, but otherwise he knows his stuff.


message 43: by Barbara K (new)

Barbara K | 30 comments Loved Krakatoa and The Professor! I had no idea that a movie had been made from it!


message 44: by Squeeze (last edited Jul 09, 2021 02:58PM) (new)

Squeeze | 6 comments The movie was on Netflix a couple months ago. I don't think I ever finished it. I tend to stop movies on Netflix, thinking I'll come back to them, and sometimes I don't. I should finish it if it's still available there.

I saw at least half of it, perhaps more, and thought it was a very good adaptation. It isn't one of those movies that is nothing like the book.

I especially liked how The Professor (I forget his name) explained his plan for the dictionary to a bunch of snobbish actual professors at Oxford who thought he was just some guy with no education. I remember a great scene in which they test his knowledge by throwing random questions at him and...well, you'll just have to watch it. :)


message 45: by Ashley Marie (last edited Aug 28, 2021 05:39AM) (new)

Ashley Marie  | 201 comments Here to second The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics! I never thought rowing would fascinate me the way it did in this book, and now I have a new appreciation for another Olympic sport.
And Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President had me absolutely captivated.

NF I've listened to this year and loved:
The Splendid and the Vile: A Saga of Churchill, Family, and Defiance During the Blitz - I've listened to several Erik Larson books and they're always excellent.
Last Boat Out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao's Revolution by Helen Zia
Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates Jr
Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall
Just as I Am - Robin Miles reads Cicely Tyson's memoir beautifully.

More from recent years:
Ibram X Kendi's Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, read by Christopher Dontrell Piper
Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States
Trevor Noah's memoir, Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood
Tom Reiss's The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo
The Toni Morrison Book Club
Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz's An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States
Jim Beaver's memoir Life's That Way
Stephen King & Stewart O'Nan's Faithful: Two Diehard Boston Red Sox Fans Chronicle the Historic 2004 Season
George Carlin's Last Words, read by his brother Patrick
Sally Bedell Smith's Elizabeth the Queen: The Life of a Modern Monarch and Prince Charles: The Passions and Paradoxes of an Improbable Life
Saroo Brierley's A Long Way Home, adapted into the film LION starring Dev Patel and Nicole Kidman
Kate Clifford Larson's Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman: Portrait of an American Hero
Erica Armstrong Dunbar's Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge
and Sarah Vowell's books are excellent on audio!


back to top