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Readings and Nominations > Nominations for March 2017

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message 1: by Marie (last edited Jan 24, 2017 04:50PM) (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Nominations are open for our March group read. With Women's History Month in March, and the recent anniversary of women's suffrage and the current marches in the US, whatever your views on recent events, I thought a Women's Fiction month might be a good idea. I'll list some suggestions below, they are only a place to start. All suggestions are welcome. All selections should be by female authors and be considered a contribution to the women's movement. Nominations will run through January 26, and voting will run from the 27th through the 31st. I will schedule the read depending on the length of book chosen.

SUGGESTIONS

Any of the works of Virginia Woolf
The Years
Mrs. Dalloway
The Waves
Orlando
A Room of One's Own
To the Lighthouse
Night and Day

The Awakening by Kate Chopin

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

The Group by Mary McCarthy

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell

Nominations
The Bell Jar
The Yellow Wallpaper
Work


message 2: by QNPoohBear (last edited Jan 23, 2017 12:06PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 470 comments This is my speciality. I pretty much majored in women's lit. I'll go see what I have left on my bookshelf and nominate a few more books. I think I have most of those books if I can't get them from the library long enough to read along.

How about Their Eyes Were Watching God or something by a more contemporary author like Toni Morrison or Alice Walker? The Color Purple is tough to begin but wonderfully moving once the story gets going. My professor forced us to read it out loud to get through the tough parts together. I haven't seen the movie.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ I'm happy to nominate The Bell Jar


message 4: by Marie (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
I have The Bell Jar

QNPoohBear wrote: "This is my speciality. I pretty much majored in women's lit. I'll go see what I have left on my bookshelf and nominate a few more books. I think I have most of those books if I can't get them from ..."

How intersectional is Their Eyes Were Watching God? Somehow I've managed to never read either of these, but I know The Color Purple leans far more heavily to racial issues than I want for this read. I really want to keep solely to issues faced by women, without the added struggles of race on top of that. We could definitely have a Black Studies month, and discuss the further fight for black women to obtain the rights of their other female counterparts.


message 5: by QNPoohBear (last edited Jan 24, 2017 03:08PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 470 comments The Color Purple is all about women and women's rights. Celie and Squeak struggle to find their voices. Their Eyes Were Watching God is less about the general struggle for women's rights and more about the main character's journey towards self-love and affirming her own value.

To the Lighthouse was tough even for the graduate students. I didn't have a problem with the stream of consciousness.

What about The Yellow Wallpaper? The Yellow Wallpaper and Other Stories?

Or Anne; A Novel

I think we should read Louisa May Alcott's Work: A Story of Experience (why does the state library have this under children's? It's not a children's book!) “…Work is an expression of Alcott’s feminist principles and a major effort toward synthesizing in popular, readable form the broad set of beliefs encompassing family, education, suffrage, labor and the moral reform of social life that defined feminist ideology in the nineteenth century.” (pg. 191 from Critical Essays on Louisa May Alcott edited by Madeleine Stern). It's not one I own but I've read her short story “HOW I WENT OUT TO SERVICE” and I own a t-shirt with the quote "She has read too many books and it has addled her brain"


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments I have both Woolf and "The Yelllow Wallpaper" on my TBR list. I don't think I could do the Bell Jar again, and to be honest--is that one more of a personal journey, as well, and not so much about women's rights? I found it more of a personal story than a universal.


message 7: by Marie (last edited Jan 24, 2017 04:49PM) (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "I have both Woolf and "The Yelllow Wallpaper" on my TBR list. I don't think I could do the Bell Jar again, and to be honest--is that one more of a personal journey, as well, and not so much about w..."

It is more of a autobiographical journey, but it does question a lot of the double speak aimed at women and their expected roles at the time, and at the opinions on depression and mental illness in women.


I have The Yellow Wallpaper and Work. Which Woolf would you guys be most interested in?


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments EIther, though I've heard more about Yellow than I have Work


message 9: by Marie (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "EIther, though I've heard more about Yellow than I have Work"

No, I meant which Virginia Woolf title would you be interested in. I've heard Orlando is her best. To The Lighthouse or A Room of One's Own are the more popular.

The Yellow Wallpaper is Charlotte Gillmnan. Work is Louisa May Alcott


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments Sorry, haha, I¨m working and skimmed right over that! My apologies....anything at all. I own Lighthouse and A Room, but I´ll read anything.


message 11: by Marie (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Sorry, haha, I¨m working and skimmed right over that! My apologies....anything at all. I own Lighthouse and A Room, but I´ll read anything."

I figured it was something like that, but I got a good laugh out of it when I read it. ;)


message 12: by Piyumi (new)

Piyumi | 57 comments Hi, I studied Virginia Woolf for my Lit classes back in my uni days, but I found an amazing quote from To the Light House and posted it on FB. Couple of my friends seeing it also recommended A Room Of One's Own....consequently both of which I have not read, so I'll put my vote for both as I would love to get lost in her Stream of consciousness form of writing once again.


message 13: by Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ (last edited Jan 25, 2017 02:56PM) (new)

Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ I think I can get hold of most Woolf titles.

The only Woolf I've attempted to read is Night & Day which was a DNF for me, but I believe is not representative of her usual standards. I won't tackle that one again in a hurry!


message 14: by QNPoohBear (last edited Jan 25, 2017 06:26PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 470 comments A Room of One's Own is good. It's short and easy to read if I remember correctly. It's an essay rather than a novel. Alice Walker's In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens: Womanist Prose is in the same tradition. She writes about women of color but the concept can be applied to other women as well. I remember reading it and realizing why my Italian-American grandmother loved baking so much. It was her form of self-expression in a time and culture where she didn't have much of a voice in her younger days. (Boy did she make up for it in later years). In class, a group project took Alice Walker's theme and compared it to the movie How to Make an American Quilt.


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments QNPoohBear wrote: "A Room of One's Own is good. It's short and easy to read if I remember correctly. It's an essay rather than a novel. Alice Walker's In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens: Womanist Prose is..."

hahaha! (The grandma bit! Mine must surely have been stifled in her youth, too! :))


message 16: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 470 comments Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "hahaha! (The grandma bit! Mine must surely have been stifled in her youth, too! :)) "

For a dutiful Italian daughter, she sure had a temper and could swear like a sailor (usually at her older sister); then in her late 90s she lost her filter. I fortunately missed the stifled era and only know the warm, generous, loving grandmother and feisty, stubborn very very old lady.


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments QNPoohBear wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "hahaha! (The grandma bit! Mine must surely have been stifled in her youth, too! :)) "

For a dutiful Italian daughter, she sure had a temper and could swear l..."

Ah! Italian.....yes, that explains a lot! :D
I only knew the grandmother who had no filter........could be really harsh. But she loved me, in her way.


message 18: by Erik (new)

Erik (airxx) | 127 comments I'm surprised the Bronte choice hasn't been more popular. If for no other reason than she is the forgotten sister.


message 19: by Piyumi (new)

Piyumi | 57 comments wooohooo so To The Lighthouse is our March read? awesome! Happy that one of my choices were selected in the end :D by everyone.


message 20: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 470 comments I read both of those in school years ago. I'm not sure I have time to reread them. I think To the Lighthouse is still on the bookshelf so I will rescue it before it's packed or given away just in case I have time to read it and chime in the discussion.


RM(Alwaysdaddygirl) Griffin (alwaysdaddyprincess) (alwaydaddygirl) | 3 comments Aloha,

I read the Yellow Wallpaper and short stories a long time ago. I hated it. I might try it again.


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