What's the Name of That Book??? discussion

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Suggest books for me > Titles for Novice Readers

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message 1: by Guru (last edited Jan 21, 2017 12:05PM) (new)

Guru Jad (jahamie) | 16 comments Hello All,
Please, can you help me form a list about the best novels to start with for novice readers?
Age Range : 20-30.
Thank you in advance.


message 2: by Scott (new)

Scott What age range are we looking at here?


message 3: by Justin (new)

Justin | 51 comments Novice can mean many things, about what age group are you looking for?


message 4: by Guru (new)

Guru Jad (jahamie) | 16 comments Justin wrote: "Novice can mean many things, about what age group are you looking for?"

Scott wrote: "What age range are we looking at here?"

Hello..
The age group is 20-30.


message 5: by Kris (new)

Kris | 34460 comments Mod
Moved this topic to the "Just to Chat" folder.


message 6: by Aerulan (new)

Aerulan | 1199 comments Can you give a little more info about what you are hoping to accomplish and for whom?
The "best" book for one novice reader probably isn't going to be the same as for another. If you're just trying to encourage reading in general for someone who doesn't read, choosing books that fit with their interests and temperament are probably going to work better than choosing from just a generic "best books" list.


message 7: by Guru (new)

Guru Jad (jahamie) | 16 comments Kris wrote: "Moved this topic to the "Just to Chat" folder."

Thank you Kris for moving the thread to its correct category.


message 8: by Guru (new)

Guru Jad (jahamie) | 16 comments Aerulan wrote: "Can you give a little more info about what you are hoping to accomplish and for whom?
The "best" book for one novice reader probably isn't going to be the same as for another. If you're just trying..."


I agree with you that reading should fit readers' interests. But my target is introduce people to a multitude of genres and from that point forward, they can choose and select by themselves.

I teach English for University students of different majors. Most of the students are ignorant about what I personally consider as Basics (Classics and the famous known books and authors). So, I was wandering if I compile a dignified list of What You Should Have Read by the time students get to university level.

I like to take other devoted readers' opinions to ensure that the list is quiet Objective and General rather than being based upon my personal preferences (for instance, I am fond of Shakespeare and Keats and Poe and Emily Dickinson - and I have read all of their works at a very young age during school - but that doesn't mean they are the best works to start with).

Thank you for your reply.


message 9: by Aerulan (last edited Jan 22, 2017 05:37PM) (new)

Aerulan | 1199 comments Jad wrote: "I agree with you that reading should fit readers' interests. But my target is introduce people to a multitude of genres and from that point forward, they can choose and select by themselves...."

Thank you for the extra info Jad, this group has lots of people with a wide range of backgrounds and goals and two very similar questions might be looking for entirely different responses. So more detail is always helpful in getting suggestions that will work best for what you are trying to do.

I don't have any particular books to suggest at the moment, though if you haven't looked through the listopia section here on GR you might want to give that a try too. You might find some lists that are close enough to what you're trying to do to make a good starting point.


message 10: by Lobstergirl, au gratin (last edited Jan 22, 2017 07:22PM) (new)

Lobstergirl | 38279 comments Mod
The Good Earth
The Great Gatsby

are both written in a simple enough style that they are comprehensible plotwise, at least. The former you could probably say is simple through and through.

1984
The Diary of a Young Girl
Fahrenheit 451

are all easy reads.

Pride and Prejudice or Emma might be too much of a challenge for a novice adult reader, but you've got to start somewhere.

Something by Kurt Vonnegut.

I've heard A Tale of Two Cities can be read by novices.

Some of the Sherlock Holmes stories.

Something by Franz Kafka; The Metamorphosis for students who don't like long books, The Trial for students who do.

Some of the stories of Guy de Maupassant.


message 11: by Guru (new)

Guru Jad (jahamie) | 16 comments Aerulan wrote: "Jad wrote: "I agree with you that reading should fit readers' interests. But my target is introduce people to a multitude of genres and from that point forward, they can choose and select by themse..."

Thanks .. I will check the list.


message 12: by Guru (new)

Guru Jad (jahamie) | 16 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "The Good Earth
The Great Gatsby

are both written in a simple enough style that they are comprehensible plotwise, at least. The former you could probably say is simple thr..."


Thank you a lot for your suggestions.

And regarding A Tale of Two Cities,, usually all Charles Dickens' novels are suitable to students like the aforementioned novel and Oliver Twist and Great Expectations and David Copperfield.. plus Orwell's Animal Farm and Steinbeck's The Pearl. These were used to be part of our scholastic curriculum.


message 13: by Justin (last edited Jan 23, 2017 01:37PM) (new)

Justin | 51 comments are there certain kinds of thing you think you would enjoy, something filled with action? something that will make you think? Thrillers? Stuff set in the future, or fantasy?


message 14: by Guru (last edited Feb 03, 2017 02:37PM) (new)

Guru Jad (jahamie) | 16 comments Justin,

I believe a proper list should be a collective one, ranging from the realistic to the fiction. A bit of everything (save obscene novels) would be great.

Based on this, the list would contain:
1- Plays (comedy)
2- Plays (tragedy)
3- Realistic Fiction.
4- Nonfiction.
5- Fantasy.
6- Satire.
7- Science Fiction.
8- Adventure/ Thriller.
9- Detective/ Mystery.


message 15: by Christina (new)

Christina | 24 comments I would most definitely recommend East of Eden, by John Steinbeck.

I have a friend who is a writer with a master's degree in English Lit, and this is his all time favorite book. Knowing that, I avoided reading it for years, thinking it would be too difficult, or too classic for me. I was wrong; I absolutely loved it! The writing is superb, and there is so much to get out of the characters and the story. It's quite allegorical. Highly recommended for novice and expert readers alike.

East of Eden by John Steinbeck


message 16: by Lobstergirl, au gratin (new)

Lobstergirl | 38279 comments Mod
And Then There Were None and all the Agatha Christie books would be good for adult novice readers.

Jules Verne for old fashioned classic adventure/fantasy.

Arthur Hailey for schlocky adventure/drama/thrillers.

Tobacco Road

To Kill a Mockingbird


message 17: by Ann (last edited Oct 21, 2019 11:57AM) (new)

Ann | 530 comments Personally, I love young adult books. Some that stood out for me:
The Giver
Hatchet
Frindle
Where the Red Fern Grows
The Fault in Our Stars
A Wrinkle in Time
The Hunger Games
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
The Neverending Story
The Mysterious Benedict Society

If any of them like movies, you can do a book/movie comparison.


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