World, Writing, Wealth discussion

34 views
World & Current Events > Culturally insensitive speech

Comments Showing 1-50 of 75 (75 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 24, 2016 03:33PM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments What constitutes culturally insensitive speech? Can these be categorised as hate speech? Please give examples.


message 2: by Jeannine (new)

Jeannine Harris | 27 comments It is such a difficult task to answer that one. I'm not sure how it works in other parts of the world but in South Africa, given our history, on the one hand, all the multicultural friends you have, might feel perfectly comfortable with any and all cultural terms but on the other, one word that remotely leans itself to differentiation can spark deep hurt and defenses. The key? I have found that it depends on whether your audience knows you or not and of course the context. I think you have to be very careful. There is no straight forward answer.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Slurs or offensive language is usually defined by their ability to cause hurt. Hate speech is legally defined by its ability to cause action. "I hate roses" is offensive but "These inferior roses need to be taught a lesson" is hate speech.


message 4: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13825 comments In this context, if I understand it correctly, I wonder why 'national'or 'racial' insults are stronger than general ones. If you say, 'you are an idiot' - it's so innocent almost like a compliment -:), but if you say 'you are a Russian idiot', this can be a major thing. Why?


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Nik wrote: "In this context, if I understand it correctly, I wonder why 'national'or 'racial' insults are stronger than general ones. If you say, 'you are an idiot' - it's so innocent almost like a compliment ..."

It ties the insult to your identity instead of to your ability, which is not only variable but subjective. You can stop being an idiot or fat or lazy or you can argue that you are none of those things. But you can not stop being Russian or black or a female or gay etc. Our identity should never come under attack because it is the same as saying someone is worthless.


message 6: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13825 comments Tara wrote: "You can stop being an idiot..."

Not always a curable disease -:)


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Nik, you kill me lolol. Sometimes the disease is less dangerous than the cure!


message 8: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13825 comments True -:)


message 9: by Michel (last edited Oct 24, 2016 12:51PM) (new)

Michel Poulin A good example of culturally insensitive speech, made into illustrations, were the comic books on the adventures of TINTIN, published decades ago in Belgium and known worldwide. In particular, 'TINTIN AU CONGO' was a particularly offensive piece of colonial racism pushed to the extreme, depicting Africans and Congolese as moronic, irresponsible beings turned into caricatures. I raise this because images and drawings can also inflame ethnic hatred and racism: look at the reactions in the Muslim world to the various cartoons on the Prophet Mohammed published in Europe. I say that culturally insensitive speech and artwork will often be perceived as racism by those targeted by the speech/artwork. What the author(s) of the speech/artwork think of it then becomes mostly irrelevant.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Michel wrote: "A good example of culturally insensitive speech, made into illustrations, were the comic books on the adventures of TINTIN, published decades ago in Belgium and known worldwide. In particular, 'TIN..."

Charlie Hebdo, anyone?


message 11: by Leer (new)

Leer Es | 24 comments I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs. Usually a stereotype and may or may not be done to intentionally hurt someone's feelings.
(All Arabs are towel head, camel jockeys.)
Hate speech is a call for violence or subjugation against a person or people based on that stereotype.
(All Arabs are jihadi fanatics that need to be nuked and/or enslaved.)

*NOTE : I don't hate Arabs or any other group of people. Anyone who judges by the group is a fool. Take people one at a time.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Leer wrote: "I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs. Usually a stereotype and may or may not be done to intentionally hurt someone..."

Agree with your definition.


message 13: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 24, 2016 11:08PM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Leer wrote: "I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs. Usually a stereotype and may or may not be done to intentionally hurt someone..."

Very well said, Leer. We are here to discuss issues, not to judge anyone. Thanks to the moderators.


message 14: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) How about anything that comes out of Donald Trumps mouth?


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Justin wrote: "How about anything that comes out of Donald Trumps mouth?"

You mean he's not your favorite bad ombre?


message 16: by Graeme (last edited Oct 24, 2016 11:02PM) (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Leer wrote,
I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs....

What if someone believes that the public execution of gays and adulterers is entirely appropriate, and comes from a society which also believes that and takes action to enforce such punishments.

How do you discuss such a topic, from a position that executing gays and adulterers is wrong, with someone who holds those beliefs to be right - without being deemed to be culturally insensitive?


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "Leer wrote, I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs....
What if someone believes that the public execution of gays and..."


You deal with that by questioning their beliefs respectfully and stating why you do not agree with them as opposed to condemning their beliefs or telling them where they are wrong. You can't decide on another person's ethics or morals you can only compare and contrast them to your own. It is hard not to do that, I know, but it is the right thing to do. It takes practice and discipline not to tell people that they are idiots or wicked when you feel in your heart that they are. But they may feel the same about you so where would we all be if we forced our views on others? What must be adhered to is the law and I am grateful that, for the most part, i live in a country where the majority of what I believe to be right and true is reflected in the nation's laws. For the most part lol.


message 18: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "Leer wrote, I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs....
What if someone believes that the public execution of gays and..."


Hmmm. That's a hard one Graeme. I wouldn't wish execution even on pedophiles. Maybe life imprisonment.


message 19: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Tara wrote: "Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "Leer wrote, I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs....
What if someone believes that the pub..."


Excellent Tara!


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Mehreen wrote: "Tara wrote: "Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "Leer wrote, I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs....
What if someone believes..."


I used to believe in the death penalty but it is quite complicated so I just err on the side of caution with it. Some people deserve to die nut there are so many examples where the legal system got it wrong that it scares me.


message 21: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Tara wrote: "Mehreen wrote: "Tara wrote: "Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "Leer wrote, I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs....
What if ..."


It scares me too. It upsets me very much when the innocent wrongly get death penalty. I would err on the side of caution here. However, letting pedophiles go free scares the hell out o' me.


message 22: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan WRT the death penalty, it strikes me that it comes down to what people think is the greater injustice.

[1] To not punish the guilty, or

[2] To punish the innocent.

I'm against the death penalty precisely because I think that it is a greater injustice to punish the innocent than it is to let the guilty go free.

Given human fallability and the opportunity for corruption, I prefer that the state does not have the power to execute people, because invariably the innocent will be killed.


message 23: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Tara wrote: "Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "Leer wrote, I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs....
What if someone believes that the pub..."


Hi Tara, I get where you're coming from and I respect that.


message 24: by GR (new)

GR Oliver | 479 comments The death penalty isn't about punishment or justice. It's about anger, hate, and self sinning.


message 25: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments GR wrote: "The death penalty isn't about punishment or justice. It's about anger, hate, and self sinning."

Whose hatred for whom though? I would hate to send the innocent under a guillotine.


message 26: by GR (new)

GR Oliver | 479 comments Those who committed the sinful act. Those who want punishment sin in return. It's equal on both sides.


message 27: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 25, 2016 03:53AM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments GR wrote: "Those who committed the sinful act. Those who want punishment sin in return. It's equal on both sides."

I see what you mean. But for those who haven't sinned or those more sinned against than sinning, what do you say then?


message 28: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan What if like me, you don't believe in sin.


message 29: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Tara, I was reflecting upon what you wrote, and it makes perfect sense for everyone who is willing to live in a fair, just and civil society. (Which includes me 100%).

But what about those people who don't want to live in a fair, just and civil society, who will undermine, co-opt and subvert your approach (and any approach) to enable the reaping of value from other peoples lives.

It strikes me that there are many conversations in society, and not just in good reads groups, but everywhere, that fail to address the presence of evil in the human condition.

I'm left with the unhappy impression that all of us, myself included, are little more than people who are sitting in a circle with our hands over our eyes, discussing better ways to be nice to each other while something truly horrific is occurring right in front of us - but we dare not look at it.


message 30: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "Tara, I was reflecting upon what you wrote, and it makes perfect sense for everyone who is willing to live in a fair, just and civil society. (Which includes me 100%).

But what about those people ..."


Oh we look at it alright. But powerless to make a change. One person's evil is another's person's good. Hard to identify evil. There was a time when cannibalism was considered okay in some cultures. Just as meat eating is okay to many of us, however, not to a vegetarian. So, to get back to our topic, sensitivity is important. How we execute it and to what end is hard to determined.


message 31: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2151 comments Tara wrote: "Mehreen wrote: "Tara wrote: "Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "Leer wrote, I would feel culturally insensitive speech would be to say something disparaging about someone's background or beliefs....
What if ..."

If we're turning this into a discussion on the death penalty, I do support it, but I think that support has not changed as I get older and see things differently because it takes so long in this country from the time of sentencing to the execution. Where it can take decades to run through appeals, often suspects see technology improve enough to where previously untestable evidence suddenly becomes testable. That time delay gives lawyers and justice non-profits time to dig into cases searching for evidence of bias or evidence of a wrongful conviction.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments J.J.
From that perspective I agree. I guess I was thinking about vintage death penalty protocol lol. I know it sounds medieval but for some individuals in society, yeah, they gotta go.


message 33: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Hi Mehreen.

Wrt your first question, I agree with Tara's analysis.

Wrt the nature of evil, it can be pinned down and I will open a thread for discussion. But not right now on my phone.


message 34: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2151 comments Tara wrote: "J.J.
From that perspective I agree. I guess I was thinking about vintage death penalty protocol lol. I know it sounds medieval but for some individuals in society, yeah, they gotta go."


I think where my opinion has evolved is that I don't think it needs to be applied in all cases, and I can certainly understand the decision of prosecutors not to pursue it because the cost of the appeals process now makes it more expensive to taxpayers than a sentence of life without parole.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments J.J. wrote: "Tara wrote: "J.J.
From that perspective I agree. I guess I was thinking about vintage death penalty protocol lol. I know it sounds medieval but for some individuals in society, yeah, they gotta go...."


I think it should be applied in perhaps 3% of all capital cases. Hands down.


message 36: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Murderers of small children should be executed, period, especially if caught red-handed. There is no place in the World for monsters like them.


message 37: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 26, 2016 02:05AM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Michel wrote: "Murderers of small children should be executed, period, especially if caught red-handed. There is no place in the World for monsters like them."

Murderers and pedophiles, rapists and what have we should be dealt with severely, if proven guilty. But as is the case, often innocent people become victims. And we don't want innocent people to get caught up in death sentence.


message 38: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 26, 2016 02:03AM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments There are no easy solutions. That is the problem.


message 39: by Leer (new)

Leer Es | 24 comments Boy have we strayed from the original question.
In response to Tara's question about respecting or questioning a person's beliefs that run morally counter to our own I can only say that it is a discussion that can ONLY be had between two or more people capable of talking about the subject without tying up intense emotions in it. If one of both sides of the discussion is too emotionally involved with the subject it can be nearly to entirely impossible to convince or be convinced of any point of view.
This discussion upon the death penalty has certainly taken a decided emotional turn over a purely objective view. Whether he was aware of it or not when Michel used the term "monsters" he was removing the human element from any person that has committed such a crime. It is easier to kill that which isn't human in our eyes. If someone takes the time to really learn about some of these people it becomes much harder to condemn them to death. Ask any sniper any they will tell you that they have to learn everything they can bout their target. Often watching them for days. Learning their habits, seeing their frustrations. Then when they are most human and most vulnerable the sniper takes his shot. It often leaves a terrible psychological scar on these elite marksman.
That being said I do support the death penalty, but I never forget that there is a person and not an animal on the receiving side of the equation.
Sorry, I got down a little rabbit hole. Just passing on my own observations.


message 40: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Thanks Leer.

A thoughtful comment


message 41: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Leer wrote: "Boy have we strayed from the original question.
In response to Tara's question about respecting or questioning a person's beliefs that run morally counter to our own I can only say that it is a di..."


We have strayed quite a bit haven't we? To come back to culturally insensitive comments. What are they?


message 42: by GR (new)

GR Oliver | 479 comments Mehreen wrote: "GR wrote: "Those who committed the sinful act. Those who want punishment sin in return. It's equal on both sides."

I see what you mean. But for those who haven't sinned or those more sinned agains..."


It's all equal. The more you sin, the more sin is against you. And likewise with less.

I don't know of anyone who doesn't sin. We all sin. I guess it depends on what you call sin. Even the saints sinned. The only difference, they realized their sin. Most people don't.


message 43: by GR (new)

GR Oliver | 479 comments Graeme Rodaughan wrote: "What if like me, you don't believe in sin."

That is a problem. And, it is something I really don't want to get into. But, do you know right from wrong? If you do, than you know what sin is. Sin is a social condition, and has nothing to do with religion. Religion just incorporated it to subject people. Sin changes from society to society, and within society. Plus, it changes over time. When I was a kid, sex was a sin--any kind. As I grew up, it changed to "Iffy." Today, it's no longer a sin. In fact, in some parts of society, it's encouraged.

For instance: When I was in the military 1960-65, sex of any kind was a court-martial offense, if caught in the act. Now, it's totally different. I retired from the Department of Defense (DoD), and sex, of any kind, is now encouraged. Basically for psychological and health reasons.

I've seen many young men come into the military with religious backgrounds. Once gone through the psychological training of combat (all military training is psychologically based), they now can kill without sin. Those who have a deep religious base, really have a problem. And the military is full of these types of individuals. It's a big military problem. They can't adjust to civilian life. I friend of mine, who was once a strong Catholic, now will not go near a church.


message 44: by GR (last edited Oct 26, 2016 01:02AM) (new)

GR Oliver | 479 comments Mehreen wrote: "Michel wrote: "Murderers of small children should be executed, period, especially if caught red-handed. There is no place in the World for monsters like them."

Murderers and pedophiles, rapists an..."


Michel, it sounds like there is a hint of al-Qaeda speaking through you. Execution of any kind is immoral. I'm against the death penalty. There are and must be better solutions to the problem. But, it all stems from the lack of compassion for mankind. It is the development of hate rather than love.


message 45: by GR (new)

GR Oliver | 479 comments Morality would be a good topic to discuss, but I don't know how to start a tread.


message 46: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 26, 2016 01:45AM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments GR wrote: "Mehreen wrote: "GR wrote: "Those who committed the sinful act. Those who want punishment sin in return. It's equal on both sides."

I see what you mean. But for those who haven't sinned or those mo..."


What sins are these? A white lie, is that a sin?


message 47: by GR (new)

GR Oliver | 479 comments Jeannine wrote: "It is such a difficult task to answer that one. I'm not sure how it works in other parts of the world but in South Africa, given our history, on the one hand, all the multicultural friends you have..."

I agree with you Jeannine. Culturally insensitive speech, for me, has been a big problem. It has changed over time. I grew up with the attitude, any form of cursing is a sin. I had a strong religious up bringing. And if I used any offensive words, my mouth was washed out with soap. To this day, I still have reservations about using foul language. Being around soldiers, before retiring, I've pickup some choice ditties.

Over the years society has changed. We see it in movies, TV, radio, and now the Internet. It's now common place. The biggest shock I experienced was when I went to work for the Dept of Def (DoD). It was the first time I heard women speak like guttersnipes. I still can't get over it.

What does this all mean? Society is going to all hell! Today, everything is going to all hell. Everything about society is a mess. Just look at fashions. Women dress like hookers, and men dress like septic grunge.

I guess being 80, I don't fit in this world. I came from a world of elegance and pride, which I don't see in the world today.


message 48: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments GR wrote: "Mehreen wrote: "Michel wrote: "Murderers of small children should be executed, period, especially if caught red-handed. There is no place in the World for monsters like them."

Murderers and pedoph..."


I also think so. Hatred is the root.


message 49: by Michel (last edited Oct 26, 2016 09:14AM) (new)

Michel Poulin GR wrote: "Mehreen wrote: "Michel wrote: "Murderers of small children should be executed, period, especially if caught red-handed. There is no place in the World for monsters like them."

Murderers and pedoph...Michel, it sounds like there is a hint of al-Qaeda speaking through you. Execution of any kind is immoral."


Excuse me? Me, having a hint of al-Qaeda in me because I am for executing the murderers of small children? You are way out of line, GR. How many child murderers got to walk, thanks to leniency in the courts, only to kill again? What about those murdered children who could have lived if those killers would have been taken out for good? Al-Qaida kills to terrorize people into adopting their perverted version of Islam, yet you compare me to them? Get off your high moral horse and stop insulting those who disagree with you.


message 50: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13825 comments Agree, 'hint of Al-Qaeda' was inappropriate. Please, refrain from personal attacks.


« previous 1
back to top