Books of Literature by Nobel Prize Winning Authors: 2020 Challenge discussion

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Out of Africa > Week 1

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message 1: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Comments posted here.


message 2: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Kamante and Lulu are both beautiful stories of Africa coming to Blixen and her being enriched by them. Kamante is a native boy and Lulu a deer. Karen describes them and their interaction with something of nostalgia and longing. She also describes the places around such as the Ngong Forest and her life in Africa.


message 3: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Section 2 has less happy memories. A shooting incident involving several children is sad but the way that 'justice' is dispensed is interesting. The differences between the tribes I also find interesting. You can hear Karen's joy in being alive in Africa in some of the scenes where she is riding her horse or looking at the night sky. That by the stars the people are guided and travel much at night makes sense. Even though there is much danger I never got the sense that Karen felt afraid but rather rejoiced in the land and it's unique beauty and almost mystic wonders.


message 4: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 263 comments I have started reading the book today. My first impressions are mixed, so I will see how the book develops. (As a vegetarian, I am not impressed with her background of shooting animals.)


message 5: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments The first part was not my favourite; the best part I think is section III. Animal hunting is typical of the time and being aware of the feelings of animals was not usual. That whole 'Empire conquering and building' and 'white-man rules the world' ethos was probably what brought about the Great War.
I think the book is a beautiful description of the time and place. Karen is telling it as it is.


message 6: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 263 comments I have read a bit more and am getting used to her writing style. You can tell she really cared for the people around her, also her love of nature.


message 7: by Rosemarie (new)

Rosemarie | 263 comments I have finished the first part and have mixed feelings about the book, perhaps because it is representative of the time it was written. I am sure she was a good landowner, but the way she describes the different groups of native Africans and their characteristics states a lot about the prevailing attitude at the time. She was helpful to her " tenants" but seemed to be above them, because she was European.
It is an interesting look at her life, but I haven't warmed to the book yet.


message 8: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 365 comments Rosemarie wrote: "I have finished the first part and have mixed feelings about the book, perhaps because it is representative of the time it was written. I am sure she was a good landowner, but the way she describes..."

I agree that at first there is a white supremacy attitude but anything else would have been unusual for wealthy Europeans of the time. The beauty of the book is the fact that she does change and sees Africa and her people with eyes of wonder and respect. I think Africa changed her for the better and this is why she wrote the book; it is a love story to Africa.


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