The Readers Review: Literature from 1714 to 1910 discussion

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2016 Group Reads - Archives > The Moonstone - First Period Chapters 19-22, Second Period Chapter 1-4

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message 1: by Pip (new)

Pip | 468 comments Comments for section 3: Section 3 - First Period Chapters 19-22, Second Period Chapter 1-4

Sorry for posting late, everyone. My PC is in a coma and that's where all my notes are stored.

I'll make all the remaining threads now so that people can go ahead and discuss. I'll add questions and observations on the sections if and when my computer revives.

Off the top of my head, this section introduces Clack. How did you get in with the change in narrator and narrative style?


message 2: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2803 comments Mod
I think that Miss Clack is a self righteous snoop and a real prig. Collins complete switch in style from the delightful Betteredge with his Robinson Crusoe, to Miss Clack and her tracts, is a great success.


message 3: by Lori, Moderator (new)

Lori Goshert (lori_laleh) | 1320 comments Mod
I also liked hearing from different narrators.

Some notes I had from this section:

1. I loved Betteredge's "superiority to reason!"

2. Cuff believe Rachel has a debt. How could she have a debt? She's not exactly the shopaholic type. Could someone be blackmailing her? For what? Did someone else in the family do something, and she has to pay someone else to keep it quiet?

3. Does Rachel already know about the "Indian conspiracy," and did she stage a robbery to throw the Indians off the track so she can sell (or keep) the diamond in peace?

4. Collins mentions the roses a lot. Is the Moonstone hidden in the garden? Are we meant to suspect the gardener?


message 4: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2803 comments Mod
I don't think Collins suspects the gardener. But certain people did have conversations in the garden, so maybe that is why it is important. I wonder if Wilkie Collins loved roses? That might explain why he mentions them a lot.
I don't see how Rachel could have a debt either. It is highly unlikely that she would have an opportunity to incur a debt with her mother in the same household.


message 5: by Roxane (new)

Roxane Rosemarie wrote: "I don't think Collins suspects the gardener. But certain people did have conversations in the garden, so maybe that is why it is important. I wonder if Wilkie Collins loved roses?

I am noticing the roses too. I wonder if they are not a clue or a metaphor. If I remember correctly, Cuff is arguing with the gardener as to whether or not the white moss rose needs to be grafted onto the dog rose in order for the moss rose to bloom?

I know a good writer does not put in extraneous details. The details he chooses must move the plot along, so I feel somehow the roses are important here... especially the argument with the gardener. And what is the song that Cuff is always humming?



message 6: by Roxane (new)

Roxane I have just met Miss Clack, and already she is getting on my nerves with her self deprecation and parading her piety for all to see. She says, " It cost me a hard struggle before Christian humility conquered sinful pride..." Conquered? Ha!

Collins has done a superb job with character development, that's for sure, and I do like the change of narrative and style... but I do not like Miss Clack! What a fitting name for her!


message 7: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2803 comments Mod
The annoying Miss Clack has a name that suits her well. She is a complete change from Gabriel, that is certain.


message 8: by Brit (new)

Brit | 80 comments I read the Moonstone a while ago as part of a different group read on Goodreads. There, as well as in this group reads, some find the narrators unreliable. I prefer to think of them as coming from different perspectives, many times very flawed in their understanding. So like in real life, we must figure out what is real and what must be taken by a grain of salt.

For that reason I enjoyed Miss Clack's narrative. I doubt she grasped the actual situation, but when the mystery is resolved, I can look at her narrative and see what she got right and where she was way off base.


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