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message 1: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Do you think there should be official guidelines before traveling to a foreign country about dress codes as per the custom of the country? For example anyone traveling from the Middle East to the west should be warned against Burqas, and Niquabs, Burquinies and Hijab and vice versa?


message 2: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin I don't know about the USA, but in Canada, the Department of External Affairs publishes on its site a list of advisories, counsels and guidelines per country.


message 3: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Michel wrote: "I don't know about the USA, but in Canada, the Department of External Affairs publishes on its site a list of advisories, counsels and guidelines per country."

But it doesn't say that people can't wear them when they enter those countries, given the the high percentage of dislikes for such clothing in the west.


message 4: by Jen Pattison (new)

Jen Pattison | 409 comments Mehreen wrote: "For example anyone traveling from the Middle East to the west should be warned against Burqas, and Niquabs, Burquinies and Hijab and vice versa?"

Why should they be warned? I don't know about burkinis as I haven't been to a beach for ages but apart from the burqa, in Britain, Germany and Italy I've seen plenty of the others. I think that the recent headlines have blown the 'problem' out of all proportion. Many Europeans aren't bothered at all about what others wear.

If I'm travelling to a country where women are expected to dress modestly I will respect that and dress accordingly. To wear a skimpy top and short shorts is not only insensitive but exceedingly stupid as far as I'm concerned.


message 5: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14956 comments Mehreen wrote: "Do you think there should be official guidelines before traveling to a foreign country about dress codes as per the custom of the country?..."

I think it's the direct task of a foreign ministry to forewarn citizens about things that may get them into trouble because of ignorance about something customary in the foreign turf. If it's the dress code that can get you into trouble, your ministry better let you know about it.
Wrong assumption or recklessness may result in some severe consequences.. For example, there are/were foreigners doing long jail terms in Thailand for what is considered almost 'innocent' offenses in the West like possession of marijuana for personal use.


message 6: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 16, 2016 01:44AM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments I couldn't agree with both of you more, Jen and Nik. Xenophobia seems have taken a new high point.


message 7: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2250 comments What you're talking about goes way beyond dress, but applies to laws in general. We in the US for example enjoy a lot of liberties that don't exist in other countries, or don't exist with the same level of freedom. We've talked about how Germany limits certain hate speech - that's something we should know before going over there, so we don't end up saying something off-handed, then wonder why we're in trouble with the law.

But some of it is common sense too. As restrictive as travel into Iran is for Americans, those that do go in (journalists for example) do seem to understand that they have to be extremely respectful toward the regime if they want to stay out of trouble. Then you have the idiot that went into North Korea (same type of situation) and tore down a propaganda poster on camera. Then wondered why he was arrested. I can't imagine any American thinking North Korea is a situation like Brazil where you can get drunk, vandalize a gas station, and lie about what happen, and the worst that happens is public humiliation and a little legal drama before you're allowed to go home.


message 8: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 1022 comments It's the responsibility of the traveler to find out whatever might apply to them before they go, and with the internet, that has never been easier. Also it's the traveler's responsibility to not do stupid things. And maybe watch "Locked Up Abroad" before venturing anywhere :).

nik says: what is considered almost 'innocent' offenses in the West like possession of marijuana for personal use.

Yeah you could totally go to jail for that here (USA). It varies by state now, but you can't just go across state lines with your stash and assume you're safe because the state you live in allows it.


message 9: by Zee (new)

Zee Monodee (zee_monodee) | 0 comments I think it is stated already in guide books what you should do or not. On all Air Mauritius flights into the island, there is a free magazine called Islander, and it's part a guide book to the island. I clearly recall one section saying do not wear shorts when visiting mosques and temples. So tourists will know what is respectful or not.
Also, in today's age, everyone does their research and reads tons of reviews before going anywhere or even buying anything, so claiming ignorance is really a hard deal now.


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