Asti's AP Lit & Comp 2016-2017 discussion

Their Eyes Were Watching God
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TEWWG - Violence

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message 1: by Mrs. Asti (last edited Oct 13, 2016 09:57AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Mrs. Asti | 14 comments Mod
In great literature, no scene of violence exists for its own sake. Consider a moment in Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God" that confronts the reader or audience with a scene or scenes of violence. In a well-organized introductory paragraph, explain how the scene or scenes contribute to the meaning of the complete work. Avoid plot summary.


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message 2: by Erin (last edited Oct 15, 2016 06:31PM) (new)

Erin Gallo | 13 comments Erin Gallo
In the novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God" by Zora Neale Hurston, violence plays a significant role throughout and allows readers to comprehend the era this novel had been written during. It is essential to make sure the readers understand how violence is seen through the characters’ eyes as well, because although it seems to the audience that violence is completely abnormal and uncalled for, in this novel it is perceived to be as casual and in some cases, moral. For example, one scene that stood out was in chapter seventeen when Tea Cake had grown aggressive with Janie; It states “Before the week was over he had whipped Janie.” (Pg.147) but then follows with “Not because her behavior justified his jealousy, but it relieved that awful fear inside him.” (Pg.147) now that awful fear he so felt was caused by how threatened he felt by Mrs. Turner’s brother. From just a snippet of the paragraph, the author reveals an entirely different side from dreamy and faultless Tea Cake and that can instantly change the way readers perceive him in the remaining chapters. However, not even the fact that he whipped Janie is as appalling as to how he responds to Sop-de-Bottom, it is as if Tea Cake encourages the appraisal when Sop-de-Bottom said “Tea Cake, you sho is a lucky man.” relating to how he has Janie wrapped around his finger (Pg.147). Hurston pushes her readers to fix their idea of violence to take it as the towns people do which came off as something positive. Yes, the women and men were talking about it but Hurston includes “It aroused a sort of envy in both men and women.” to elaborate exactly what chatter was going around. Along with revealing a negative side of Tea Cake, Hurston also reveals a side of the Janie readers grown to know along the chapters. Hurston achieves this by particularly writing about how Janie reacts to Tea Cake’s violence, she states “the helpless way she hung on him” (Pg. 147); The readers need to take into account how she reacted when Joe Starks hit Janie as stated he “struck Janie with all his might” (Pg.80) which they grew apart after. The author leaves a blank slate to encourage her readers to think as to why Janie did not get as hurt as she did with Jody and although to some it may be evident, it depicts an altered image of Janie in the readers’ minds. Overall, the novel as a whole relies on these events of violence to shape it, whether it is to help the readers understand the time period, the characters or simply the plot.


message 3: by Xayanjely (new)

Xayanjely Lopez | 14 comments Xayanjely Lopez

Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Are Watching God" is a complex story that involves violence, grief, friendship, agony, intimacy, and excitement. One of the more evident features in the novel is violence. Violence is seen throughout the book many times on different occasions. One particular scene that involves great violence is the scene where Nanny agressively slaps Janie. "She slapped the girl's face violently, and forced her head back so that their eyes met in a struggle." This action made by the grandmother can be seen as one made out of discipline simply because she is Janie's guardian. Although that may be the case, Nanny forced herself to hit Janie because Janie was not listening or understanding what Nanny was trying to tell her. On top of that she continued to whine when Nanny only wanted the best for her. Janie thinks that "the vision of Logan Killicks was desecrating" and "she merely hunched over and poured at the floor." Janie's behavior is a result of her young age and innocence. Because of these characteristics that she posses, she is unable to comprehend that sometimes people must make sacrifices even though it may not please them. After Nanny's belligerent action she quickly recoils and speaks to Janie in a soft voice. She notices watch damaged has been done and quickly regrets it. This scene contributes to the entirety of the novel by illustrating a picture of Nanny's and Janie's relationship. In addition to that, it becomes one of the many reasons that Janie ends up hating Nanny for.


message 4: by Joel (new)

Joel Mena | 1 comments In the novel “Their Eyes Are Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston, the author shows two different versions of violence. One type of violence is when Jody Starks hits Janie because he feels she is being disrespectful. The second type of violence is when Tea Cake whips Janie to show the others that Janie is his. The violence in both these scenes show the type of person both Tea cake and Jody Starks are. It shows that Tea cake is the type of person who really cares for Janie and does what he feels is best to be able to stay with Janie till the end. While Jody Starks acts out in anger towards Janie because he feels disrespected. This goes and changes the way that Jody is seen by the reader. After this incident Jody is seen as too controlling and possessive. While the scene with tea cake shows the reader just how much the he loves Janie to go to the extent of whipping her and showing he is hers.


message 5: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Traebecke (obiwance) | 7 comments In Zora Neale Hurtson's novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God," includes various characteristics demonstrated throughout the course of the story. Though, a particular trait that often stood out was violence towards Janie. These violent scenes portrayed different versions of the word violence itself. And so, Janie soon begins to accept the violence as something to be welcomed and embraced. Violence to her eyes often made her realize whether the person who inflicted that pain upon her really is and opens her eyes to the world and truly see those for who they really are. Since pain can cause love or distaste.


message 6: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Munoz | 7 comments In "Their Eyes Were Watching God" by Zora Neale Hurston, violence, and love is shown through the eyes of one person. In the novel, without love there wouldn't be any violence within the book. For example, in Chapter 17 pg. 147, Tea Cake whips Janie to show the Turners Family who has in possession over Janie and to relieve his fear of them. Tea Cake did this out of the love for Janie. He wanted the Turners to leave them alone and to prevent anymore ideas of them getting into Janie's head. Tea Cake has never wanted to put Janie into arms way but it was necessary for him to do in order to declare his love for Janie. As we can see, Janie doesn't fight back because she isn't the type of person who fights back. The way the novel puts violence is to do it out of the love of a community, or people. Such as Chapter 17, pg. 150-153, Tea Cake starts a fight at Mrs.Turners restaurant to run the Turners out of the Everglades and so everyone canalize happily without worrying about them. Violence will always have its meaning in every story. It just depends on how authors use it and symbolize just like Zora Neale Hurston in "Their Eyes Were Watching God." Hurston way of violence is to make it out of love.


message 7: by Dulce (new)

Dulce Lazo | 6 comments Dulce Lazo

In Zora Neale Hurtson’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” Violence has been a significant aspect throughout the novel. The exhibition of domestic violence is one of the most evident actions especially towards Janie. The use of violence not only includes Physical but as well Verbally abusive. One example of Physical abuse to Janie is when Joe strikes her when his dinner is not satisfactory in which he does it publicly, her relationship with Jody reveals the desire for Power and Control which leads out to be Violence. There seems to be a continues pattern of Violence and Control in Janie’s life. In addition, Janie learns that love is linked to Violence, such as when both Joe and Tea Cake beat/ whip her to declare their dominance.


message 8: by Luis (new)

Luis Gonzalez | 8 comments In Zora Neale Hurston’s, “Their eyes were watching god,” violence makes up a huge aspect of the time period in which the book was written in. Throughout the novel, the reader is able to obtain an idea on how woman were objectified back in the day and not having choices in their lives. In the series of events that take place, violence is an occurring role in the story. To begin with, the reader is able to understand this when Nanny strips Janie of her freedom. She demands that she be married to Logan Killicks to provide Janie with protection. Although, Nanny’s intentions are pure, Janie is not fond of her choices. Therefore, the reader understands Janie was forced to marry Logan when she did not want to that, can be considered as sexual violence. The next event takes place when Logan Killicks belittles Janie. This type of emotional violence helps the reader understand that woman were treated with little to no respect because it depicts Janie as unimportant and worthless in society. The last event established the idea of men being superior over woman when Jody Starks slaps Janie out of anger. He mentions her as “incompetent” when she's unable to cut a plug of tobacco for a customer, and while also insulting her looks. Janie repels by insulting Jody which makes him feel impotent in front of everybody leading him to slapping Jane. These events entail the unfortunate lives of women, and how Zora Neale Hurston was able to exemplify the events into a story.


message 9: by Luis (new)

Luis Gonzalez | 8 comments Luis Gonzalez

In Zora Neale Hurston’s, “Their eyes were watching god,” violence makes up a huge aspect of the time period in which the book was written in. Throughout the novel, the reader is able to obtain an idea on how woman were objectified back in the day and not having choices in their lives. In the series of events that take place, violence is an occurring role in the story. To begin with, the reader is able to understand this when Nanny strips Janie of her freedom. She demands that she be married to Logan Killicks to provide Janie with protection. Although, Nanny’s intentions are pure, Janie is not fond of her choices. Therefore, the reader understands Janie was forced to marry Logan when she did not want to that can be considered as sexual violence. The next event takes place when Logan Killicks belittles Janie. This type of emotional violence helps the reader understand that woman were treated with little to no respect because it depicts Janie as unimportant and worthless in society. The last event established the idea of men being superior over woman when Jody Starks slaps Janie out of anger. He mentions her as “incompetent” when she's unable to cut a plug of tobacco for a customer, and while also insulting her looks. Janie repels by insulting Jody which makes him feel impotent in front of everybody leading him to slapping Jane. These events entail the unfortunate lives of women, and how Zora Neale Hurston was able to exemplify the events into a story.


message 10: by Crystal (new)

Crystal | 12 comments Crystal Verdecia period:1

Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God" presents the protagonist Janie who struggles to find true love and a sense of true freedom. Janie was always under control by someone in her life (Nanny, Joe Starks, Logan Killicks) until she met Tea Cake. Tea Cake showed her true love and freedom; and made her feel things she didn’t know she could feel. Zora Neale Hurston confronts the reader with a many scenes of violence that reveals many things about the characters and about the author. There are two scenes of violence but with a different outcome and different things are revealed. The 1st scene of violence is where Jody strongly slaps Janie for being this disrespectful and embarrassing him in front of people who looked up to him. In this scene Janie’s feelings for him change and the image of him “fell of the shelf”; Jody was no longer as great as he seemed. Then 2nd scene is when Tea Cake smacks Janie which is completely different from the scene with Jody. Tea Cake didn’t want to slap Janie but he did it to show possession of Janie and to show Mrs. Turner that Janie is his and to show who’s boss. Janie’s reaction is different as well. Janie loses respect for Jody but With Tea Cake nothing changes; she still loves and is okay with Tea Cake hitting her. Another thing that is revealed is how the author portrays the violence scenes. For Jody, it was something so serious that changed Janie’s feelings and the reader’s feelings towards Jody but with Tea Cake’s scene she uses humor to brush to brush off the fact that he hit Janie. Hurston makes it clear to the reader how different these men are to Janie. These scenes help build the novel to show that Tea Cake and Janie have an unconditional love and helped presents how Tea Cake and Janie’s relationship is so much more meaningful to Janie because of Janie’s past relationship.


message 11: by Sharina (last edited Oct 16, 2016 03:25PM) (new)

Sharina | 13 comments Sharina Hernandez

Violence, in most works of literature, is more than a mere punch in the face. It can be a form of relieving tension as well as a way to introduce a pivotal change in character or plot. Similarly, it can be used as something symbolic to the story as a whole. Zora Neale Huston uses violence throughout her novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God”, each with their own distinct reasons. One such scene is between Janie and her grandmother Nanny when Nanny slaps Janie after being caught kissing Johnny Taylor. In this instance, violence is used to portray the complex relationship the characters share as well as a way of dissipating the tension between the two after “Johnny Taylor [lacerated] her Janie with a kiss” (page 12). Another incident is between Janie and Joe Starks when Janie serves a distasteful dinner. In order to provide a pivotal change in Janie’s perspective of Joe, the author creates a violent scene between the two. Both of these scenes illustrate the main character being hurt, each revealing the intentions of the characters.


message 12: by Elijah (new)

Elijah P. | 3 comments In Zora Neale Hurston's, "Their Eyes Were Watching God", the main protagonist Janie meets and marries three men at separate points of her life. All but the last relationship with Tea Cake gave a true feeling of love to Janie. This being said, the three relationships Janie has differ from each other, however an act of violence whether it be physical or verbal is present throughout the relationships. In each case it either destroys whatever love there was in the relationship or makes it stronger (found in the relationship with Tea Cake). It's due to this that the reader could infer that this conflict represents actual conflict in relationships that all couples go through. I personally find this true as the relationship with Tea cake had the most violence and conflict between the beating Tea Cake gave Janie, the hurricane, and the gunshot which sounded off the ending of their happiness with one another. Through all these conflicts Janie's love for Tea cake continued and grew stronger while conflict with Logan Killicks and Joe Starks ended the relationship or love within the relationship immediately. As a couple, both Janie and Tea Cake made it through the conflict while the other two didn't, thus leading the reader to perceive that these form of conflicts due represent the tough times that couples must face between each other if they truly love eachother.


message 13: by Amlex (last edited Oct 16, 2016 06:03PM) (new)

Amlex Bencosme | 10 comments Amlex Bencosme

Literature, well written and complex, encompasses dynamic themes and symbolical events that work together to construct an experience for both its characters, ergo its audience. In the exemplary novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God," author Zora Neale Hurston presents an unusual, yet pivotal, circumstance for violence between main character Janie Crawford and husband, Tea Cake. The scene involves Tea Cake, ailing as he has fallen victim under the bite of a rabid dog, and Janie who in order to protect herself from his malicious acts must shoot Tea Cake, killing the love of her life. Violence in this scene does not serve to eliminate a character, but it symbolically marks the end of Janie's odyssey: the end of finding God and herself (pg.192, lines: 14-15). Throughout the novel, Janie, as a character, is difficult to organize as she is adventurous, but follows more so than leads. She is tenacious, yet melts at the sight of potential love. The violent seen represents all that she is. Janie is able to lose Tea Cake physically and survives by sealing his presence in her heart and memory, finally able to return to Eatonville. Janie is able to return happy, despite the heartbreaking events, knowing she is stronger and sure of her life than ever before. The violence was not merely an accident or a tragedy, it served a purpose. As a member of the audience, one must figure the purpose, praise the author's eloquence, and ponder Janie's future beyond written words.


message 14: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Manosalva (SMANOSALVA) | 7 comments Sharon Manosalva

In Zora Neale Hurston's, "Their Eyes Were Watching God", violence plays a crucial role in the theme and plot of the story. Throughout the novel there are several instances where Janie, the protagonist of the novel, experiences acts of violence from those who take on a significant role in her life at the time. The author introduces the readers to Janie's world of submission, hurt, and dominance through these scene's of violence. In chapter 19, Tea cake loses self control and out of paranoia fires at Janie several times, leading Janie to taking matters into her own hands and shooting Tea cake dead, this act of violence reveals to the readers just how much Janie truly loves Tea cake; willing to lose the love of her live. Zora Neale Hurston uses violence in the novel to shape Janie, to express how Janie develops from these acts, and how her image is portrayed to both the surrounding characters in the book and to the audience.


message 15: by Kellany (new)

Kellany Marin | 9 comments Kellany Marin
"Their Eyes Were Watching God," by Zora Neale includes various characteristics throughout the book such as passion violence,lost, friendship, and excitement, a specific trait that cough my eye was the abuse Janie would receive from her second husband Joe .These violent parts throughout the book showed the reader Janie's personality and personally gave me a better understanding of why Janie stayed with Joe and the strength she had to not only put up with it but also having the ability to forgive him for everything he did to her. Janie accepted the violence which At first as a female reader it was hard to understand why but has the story went on the violence she once embraced brought her to realizing her worth and in a way she was able to let everything go at once. Joe's violence towards Janie was something she never thought he could do to her when they first met but after many years of Joe becoming more more violent the violence itself made Janie realize who he really was which later on shows her strong character because she was able to trust a man again and fall in love with
t-cake.


message 16: by Solange (new)

Solange | 13 comments Solange Cordovi P.1
In Zora Neal Hurston’s novel, “Their Eyes Were Watching God”, violence is a factor that is highly underrated but the real question is why. It could be because the time period this novel was written in or maybe Hurston had an underlying intention. For example, the scene in which Tea Cake abuses Janie is unexpected and underappreciated. The author portrays the scene as routine action. I believe it was written like this to embody Janie’s perception of the action. It seems to be, her love for Tea Cake masks a dramatic reaction to the situation. She knows that Tea Cake does not intend to genuinely hurt her but rather establish his masculinity therefore she brushes it off as ordinary. Janie has learned that love is sacrifice, even if it is her own voice she is scarifying. This scene contributes to the novel because, as readers, we know Janie has had an internal and external battle with understanding love and more importantly finding herself. Janie has the tendency to allow the man she associates herself with, determine her abilities as a woman. Now although Tea Cake has bolstered her feminine liberation she is still at his mercy. Through Tea Cake she has found a true love but has not truly found herself.


message 17: by Arael (new)

Arael Ruiz (arael67) | 8 comments Arael Ruiz

Violence is very abundant in this novel, but if I had to choose one scene in particular that was significant, I would pick Tea Cakes death scene. This scene can be considered significant because it is what ultimately leads Janie to return back home. It also establishes the fact that Janie is now secure enough with herself that she doesn’t have to seek validation from the men that are around her. To the extent that she is willing to potentially take his life away by shooting the man who she cared about the most. The book can be argued to be a feminist work and that scene demonstrates one of the key beliefs of feminism: independence from the metaphorical chains put on women by men. It also entails the idea that women are their own people with their own thoughts, feelings and ideas. Janie coming out alive in that scene would not have been possible without her being open minded enough to take precautions with Tea Cake in case he lost his mind. She then had to put her feelings aside and what was the ethically right thing to do and shoot her husband whom she loved, knowing she would have to deal with the constant agony of losing someone so significant to her and her life but at the same time understanding that it was for her own good.


message 18: by Jay (new)

Jay | 13 comments Jayri Santos
The concept of writing a violent scene in a book is not just to be superfluous and fill in the pages but to add more to the plot of the story. In Zora Neale Hurtson’s “Their eyes were watching God” there are many scenes that include violence. Such scenes include people such as (Janie, Nanny, Joe Starks, and Tea Cake.) When Nanny is introduced to the story she is introduced as a Janie’s Grandmother, as her guardian, and as time goes by that never changes. In chapter one Janie kisses Johnny Taylor a man who is twice Janie’s age and when Nanny sees this interaction between them she slaps Janie in the face once, and is about to do it a second time but stops when she sees Janie’s face. This violent scene between Nanny and Janie is put in to create a sense of the relationship they both have, even though Nanny hits Janie she cares about her enough to involve herself in Janie’s life and advice her on who she should kiss and who she should not kiss. Later on in the novel Joe Starks hits Janie “for not preparing his dinner properly.” Joe does not hit Janie because he loves her or because he cares for her but because he is possessive over Janie. When Tea Cake comes along after Joe Starks has passed away. Tea Cake whips Janie to show Mrs. Turner brother that he has full control over Janie. When Teak Cake whips Janie he does it out of love and out of fear of losing Janie. These violent scenes contribute in such a marvelous way to the plot because it shows the different aspects of Janie’s life and how differently but similarly they all relate. All of the violent scenes contain the obvious, “violence” but not all the scenes are weighted the same an example of this would be difference between Joe Starks hitting Janie and Tea Cake whipping Janie. The novel overall relies on violence to guide it to an appropriate ending.


message 19: by Natalie (new)

Natalie | 12 comments Natalie Roque
Violence in literary works is often viewed as a type of climax or rising tension for the characters. In the novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God " by Zora Neale Hurston, there are various scenes involving violence, particularly when Tea Cake decides to beat Janie out of fear of losing her. At this point in the story Janie had been no stranger to domestic abuse but her reaction to Tea Cake was what made this scene stand out, she reacts calmly and does not address it directly but rather takes it as just a normalcy in her relationship with him. She is so infatuated with this man she calls her husband that she sees past the abuse, she looks at him a certain way almost as if she's watching God himself. She sees past the violence and instead fixes her eyes on the object of her affection, her idol, her "liberator". This scene reflects off of the title, tying in elements of distress, love and ultimately, violence.
(P. 147)


message 20: by Bryan (new)

Bryan | 12 comments Bryan Rojas

In Zora Neale Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” she writes a narrative of an African American woman named Janie Crawford, who in the past has always been living her life under the control of someone, and has barely felt and understood the concept of freedom and true love. In the book Janie falls in love with a much younger man named Tea Cake, who shows her a different perspective of life, giving her simple freedoms she’s never experienced such as playing checkers, learning to shoot, and working together in a bean field. Their love soon comes to a tragic end though, when Tea Cake catches a terrible illness, driving him to the point of insanity which then leads to Janie killing her own husband to save her own life. This act of violence which Janie calls “the meanest moment of eternity” was a tremendous moment for Janie and the reader. Tea Cake was the only person who allowed Janie to understand what happiness felt like, opening her eyes to value life in a way she never thought was possible before. Yet an important thing to notice during Tea Cakes death was Janie catching him after the shot, holding on to the one thing she loved most for a little longer. What the author is trying to show in this scene is to value the important things given in life, Janie whose life had so little until she met Tea cake appreciated every second with him. The author’s scene portrays an horrific death for her character Janie, but she does it in such a way where the reader can really see true appreciation of life and those who play an important in life.In Zora Neale Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” she writes a narrative of an African American woman named Janie Crawford, who in the past has always been living her life under the control of someone, and has barely felt and understood the concept of freedom and true love. In the book Janie falls in love with a much younger man named Tea Cake, who shows her a different perspective of life, giving her simple freedoms she’s never experienced such as playing checkers, learning to shoot, and working together in a bean field. Their love soon comes to a tragic end though, when Tea Cake catches a terrible illness, driving him to the point of insanity which then leads to Janie killing her own husband to save her own life. This act of violence which Janie calls “the meanest moment of eternity” was a tremendous moment for Janie and the reader. Tea Cake was the only person who allowed Janie to understand what happiness felt like, opening her eyes to value life in a way she never thought was possible before. Yet an important thing to notice during Tea Cakes death was Janie catching him after the shot, holding on to the one thing she loved most for a little longer. What the author is trying to show in this scene is to value the important things given in life, Janie whose life had so little until she met Tea cake appreciated every second with him. The author’s scene portrays an horrific death for her character Janie, but she does it in such a way where the reader can really see true appreciation of life and those who play an important in life.


message 21: by Luciana (new)

Luciana (lucianamia) | 7 comments One prominent scene in "The Eyes Watching God" by Zora Nealle Hurston, is when Joe Starks, Janie Crawfords' husband, slaps her in front of all of the other community members and or friends who would hang around the main shop of the town. Individually, Joe Starks is a upper class mayor of his town who had made a major turning point for the citizens of the area; Janie Crawford is a young girl who runs off with a man(Joe Starks) who gives her an opportunity she has never been given before, making her seem quite naive. The main theme in this scene is "traditional female role vs. men", women were expected to take care of children, the home and to keep a positive and splashing image of their husband..the men were the head of the household and were in charge of making most of the income to sustain their land, homes and businesses. Janie Crawford is slapped because of her reaction towards Joe Starks when he insist that she covers up her long beautiful silky hair, Janie felt as if a sense of herself was being taken away from her, her resistance was something not seen and was not accepted, especially by men....Because of Joes high stature and role he reacted angrily, to him the reaction of Janie was disrespectful and outrageous.

The whole situation also connects to pre- and modern day feminism. Janie's characteristics and attitudes was of a strong female lead, one who was capable of saying and demonstrating how she clearly feels.


message 22: by Erica (new)

Erica Sarria | 7 comments Erica Sarria
In the novel “their eyes were watching god” by Zora Neale Hurston, the time period happens to be in the 1930’s where women were not exactly greatly appreciated nor are they respected. There is a scene where joe starks delivers a blow to janies face that knocks her against a lamp post and as that is happening everyone in the town just watches quietly and does not dare to interfere with it. In that era violence towards a women was more normal than how it is currently. There is a scene in the beginning of the novel where janies nanny slaps her violently but right after pulls janie in to hug her once she sees that she is about to shed tears. This goes to show that in that time period violence was seen as something more normal and not out of the ordinary.


message 23: by Tajae (new)

Tajae | 7 comments In the novel "their eyes were watching god" by Zora Neale Hurston, portrays many different scenes in the text that depicts violence such as when Tea cake hits Janie, he did not hit her for a reason like Joe starks did for messing up his breakfast, but hit her because to show possession due to all the controversies that were going on between Janie and Mrs Turner's brother. This scene is very significant because Janie does not react and for Joe Starks she does, each showing different connections of love between the two.


message 24: by Luis (new)

Luis Mentado | 8 comments In Zora Neal Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God", scenes of violence such as Joe Stark's slapping Janie are used to relieve tension throughout the story. Being that the story took place in a time period where women were seen as less, as property, it is not uncommon to see this type of violence. Scenes of violence were not only barbaric acts done to Janie, but a sort of expression. One that could either push Janie away, or make her see you in a new light. Violence is, although not frequent, a crucial part of the story's development.


message 25: by Sergio (new)

Sergio | 11 comments In Zora Neale Hurston's, "Their Eyes Were Watching God", Hurston uses scenes of violence in order to give more meaning to the overall story. One scene like this is the first time that Joe Starks hits Jamie after she accidentally makes him a bad meal. This scene shows how Joe Starks' view on Jamie has changed as he hits her without a second thought. This scene also shows how Janie's view on Joe has changed as she starts too see him as an abusive husband who wants Janie to do everything he says no matter what. Finally, Joe's abuse show how much janie has started to rely on men as she still stays with him until his death a few years later.


message 26: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Chichester | 13 comments Aaron Chichester
In the novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God", written by Zora Neale Hurston, the submissiveness of women was thoroughly expressed. The events took place during a time where men were extremely superior to women and viewed their spouses as property. Violence was a very prevalent feature of this novel. The inclusion of these violent scenes provided readers with a understanding as to how women were treated during that time and emphasized their social status. For example, in the novel, Mayor Starks strikes Janie for speaking back to him and embarrassing him in front of company at the store. This serves as a common incident in which women were expected to be obedient to their husbands. In conclusion, the violence that took place in the novel provided readers with accounts of how women and men who were in relationships interacted with each other during that time.


message 27: by Paola (new)

Paola Badillo | 10 comments Paola Badillo

Violence can be categorized by a behavior involving physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill someone or something. It can also be strength of emotion, an unpleasant or destructive natural force. Throughout Zora Neale Huston novel "Their Eyes are Watching God" she uses violence to show emotions, and to prove to the readers that even though there is pain; hurt... everything has a reason for happening. One sense that shows a strong imagery of violence is when Janie's grandmother; Nanny aggressively slaps her in the face but then hugs her afterward. Nanny caught her kissing Johnny Taylor and was devastated of her actions. "Johnny Taylor lacerating her Janie with a kiss. The old woman's voice was lacking in command and reproof" Nanny was devastated to see Janie loose her childhood and not listening. Another violent sense occurred at the end, out off all this once was brought to my attention due to the power it carried, the emotions, the way the characters related to one another and even after all the violence to prove her love for Tea Cake, Janie stayed until the end. Janie shot Tea Cake after the survival of the Hurricane. Tea Cake was illusional and ill, he thought Janie was cheating on him due to his illness but she stood by him and help him throughout the sickness until Tea Cake almost killed Janie that is when she chose her live over his. Throughout the novel violence is shown but these two particular sense stood out because these were Janie actual family, these are the true people she loved truly, and even if they did abuse of her she was willing to look passed it because of the passionate/ powerful love she carried for both Teacake and Nanny.


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