World, Writing, Wealth discussion

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All Things Writing & Publishing > A world famous author tells it like it is

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Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments I completely agree. To an extent you must write for the c aft. http://www.laurakinsale.com/tea/detai...


message 2: by Michael (new)

Michael Fattorosi | 477 comments I dont.

Writing for oneself is art. Writing and expecting someone to buy it - is business. And when it becomes a business you are beholden to your customers.

Its very simple, if you dont want it to be a service industry dont try to sell your work. Keep it for yourself/family/friends or simply give it away.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Michael wrote: "I dont.

Writing for oneself is art. Writing and expecting someone to buy it - is business. And when it becomes a business you are beholden to your customers.

Its very simple, if you dont want i..."


In this case I have to disagree because if people buy millions of copies of your book they like what you're doing. If you then start listening to them and catering to that you lose the creative spark that made them like your books in the first place. That's not good business.


message 4: by Nihar (new)

Nihar Suthar (niharsuthar) | 38 comments Love this post Tara!

-Nihar
www.niharsuthar.com


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Nihar wrote: "Love this post Tara!

-Nihar
www.niharsuthar.com"


Thank you, Nihar :) Welcome to the discussion (and to the group lol)


message 6: by Nihar (new)

Nihar Suthar (niharsuthar) | 38 comments Thank you! I'm looking to bulk up the economics folder of this group :p

-Nihar
www.niharsuthar.com


message 7: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 1020 comments It's a service industry for some people, but it doesn't have to be for everyone. I understand wanting to be protective of the characters and words to an extent. If you want to make a living off it though, it ventures into the service industry territory.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments The author of the post in the link is a wealthy woman because she trusts her writing instincts. I think that is why she says it's not a service industry. Of course there is no one size fits all when it comes to how we approach authorship but I hope to only ever write what comes from inside and what makes me happy. If people don't enjoy it then I'll just be one of those unlucky souls who love to write things no one else is interested in. And if people do like what I write I would be silly to fix what isn't broken. When I write i am an artist, not a business. But when the book is finished I cease being an artist and become a business, to some degree. I could never be happy if I confused the two. One must market and promote as if it were a business but one should write what organically occurs in the heart and mind. That's just my experience - I realize it's difference for everyone.


message 9: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Cunegan (jdcunegan) | 60 comments As a writer, my responsibility is to be true to the story and to my characters. If I can't do that, then I've failed as a creator, as a writer, and as an artist -- no matter what my sales chart might say. I would *love* to rake in hundreds of thousands of dollars from my books, but I won't sacrifice my creative vision or instincts to get there.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments J.D. wrote: "As a writer, my responsibility is to be true to the story and to my characters. If I can't do that, then I've failed as a creator, as a writer, and as an artist -- no matter what my sales chart mig..."

I agree with you.


message 11: by Zee (new)

Zee Monodee (zee_monodee) | 0 comments I think this pertains to the saying 'write what you love'. If you're not doing that, it's a struggle for your brain. When you love what you're writing, it flows, and this reflects in the words, in the flow of the story. As an editor, I can spot those books that were written to 'make a quick buck', for example, jumping on the 50 Shades bandwagon when this is not what the author usually writes.

Like Tara said, an author is an artist when writing, then a businessman in the service industry when selling.

I do believe that what you write has to come from the heart, though. A book that has heart will resonate with readers, even if they can't pinpoint exactly why they loved the book; they just know they did, and they then also love the author and most probably will make said author an auto-buy in the future.


message 12: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13507 comments I think it permeates through many threads that writers have different motivation for writing. Some write to sell, while others - for art, to express something they feel, want, etc. Don't see any problem with either motivation. What do I care what the motivation was, if the result is cool?
Hard to evaluate, who has better chance for success - the one who writes for the market or the one who writes 'for him/herself' and hopes it'll resonate with the audience.


message 13: by M.L. (last edited Oct 13, 2016 10:07AM) (new)

M.L. It seems rather hollow to do art for the sake of money: consider it a 'service industry.' Everyone is different! :-)


message 14: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2146 comments I think it's like any industry, you can divide the creators into two groups - those who follow the trends and those who create the trends. Maybe there are a lot of 50 Shades copycats making money by writing to market, but consumers didn't know they wanted that market until EL James created it.


message 15: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) This reminds me of the classic line, "Reviews aren't for the author they are for the reader". Both can make a case but at the end of the day, if we write we do so because we're good at it and we love doing it. We don't do it for the industry because we are the industry.


message 16: by Angel (new)

Angel Justin wrote: "This reminds me of the classic line, "Reviews aren't for the author they are for the reader". Both can make a case but at the end of the day, if we write we do so because we're good at it and we lo..."

Well said, Justin. Mic drop.


message 17: by Alex (last edited Oct 14, 2016 02:21PM) (new)

Alex (asato) J.J. wrote: "I think it's like any industry, you can divide the creators into two groups - those who follow the trends and those who create the trends. Maybe there are a lot of 50 Shades copycats making money b..."

i rather agree w/this assessment in that there are two extremes and a bell curve describes the distribution. furthermore, i've heard that there are writers who'd rather be writing what they love (for example, sci-fi) but write erotica (for example) b/c it pays the bills. so, there's another bell curve distribution of those who write for the sake of money and those who write for their art.

now, which ones--either one at the extreme ends or those somewhere in the middel--are the more successful is another debate.


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