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Other Prizes > Gordon Burn Prize

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message 1: by Paul (last edited Jun 22, 2021 08:19AM) (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Another newish UK prize which focuses on innovation and, dare I suggest, may have been born (like the Folio and Goldsmiths) out of Booker frustration.

"The Gordon Burn Prize seeks to reward a published title (fiction or non-fiction) written in the English language, which in the opinion of the judges most successfully represents the spirit and sensibility of Gordon's literary methods: novels which dare to enter history and interrogate the past; writers of non-fiction brave enough to recast characters and historical events to create a new and vivid reality. Literature which challenges perceived notions of genre and makes us think again about just what it is that we are reading."

Past winners:
2013: Pig Iron
2014: The Wake (excellent choice)
2015: In Plain Sight: The Life and Lies of Jimmy Savile
2016: All That Man Is
2017: The Long Drop
2018: Census
2019: For the Good Times
2020: This Is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality


message 2: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments The shortlist for 2017 is out:

http://gordonburnprize.com/shortlist/

Interestingly Lincoln in the Bardo and Autumn both made the longlist but didn't make the shortlist.

Pleased to say the Women's Prize for Fiction shortlisted First Love did, as well as a book that has been getting a lot of mentions in my twitter timeline of late, Black Teeth and a Brilliant Smile.


message 3: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments The prize that first introduced Ben Myers to the world...

I forgot to update the 2017 winner which was Denise Mina with The Long Drop.


message 4: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments And the 2018 shortlist is out - looks intriguing. From the Bookseller write up:

"The late Michelle McNamara was shortlisted for her true crime tale about the Golden State Killer, I'll Be Gone in the Dark (Faber). She died unexpectedly in her sleep in 2016 just ahead of completing the book, so it was finished by her lead researcher and close colleague, and was framed by an introduction by Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn and a "moving" afterword by her husband Patton Oswalt.

Also shortlisted are a "powerful and moving" novel by Jesse Ball entitled Census (Granta Books), which follows a father and son who are journeying across a tapestry of towns; H(a)ppy by Nicola Barker (William Heinemann), described as a "post-post apocalyptic Alice in Wonderland; In Our Mad and Furious City, a "brave and orginial" novel by Guy Gunaratne (Tinder Press, Headline); Crudo by Olivia Laing (Picador), a "funny and emphatically raw account of love in the apocalypse", and The Cost of Living by Deborah Levy (Hamish Hamilton), "a searching examination of all the dimensions of love, marraige, mourning and kinship"."


message 5: by Maddie (new)

Maddie (ashelfofonesown) | 113 comments I have read Michelle McNamara's book and really enjoyed it. The other ones are on my TBR in some capacity so I guess I'll have to start following this prize more closely!! :-)


message 6: by Tommi (new)

Tommi | 486 comments That’s definitely a strong list. I’ve read three out of the six shortlisted books and they’re all somewhere in the 4–5 star range for me.


message 7: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments And the winner is Census by Jesse Ball.


Gumble's Yard - Golden Reviewer | 5087 comments Just the excuse I need to re read it given my first experience was tainted by a badly formatted NetGalley ARC.


message 9: by Neil (new)

Neil | 1829 comments Really liked that book, except for not being sure of the stuff about cormorants. Maybe someone can put me straight.


message 10: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Interesting that of the 4 novels on the list, the 3 eligible (ie Uk/Irish author) ones were all Goldsmiths shortlisted.


message 11: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments I am just in the process of reading Gordon Burn's own Alma Cogan - he was a fascinating writer.

For example he did the Crudo / Autumn thing of a book narrating current events almost in real time before either Smith or Laing did.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/201...


message 12: by Ang (new)

Ang | 1685 comments Paul wrote: "I am just in the process of reading Gordon Burn's own Alma Cogan - he was a fascinating writer.

For example he did the Crudo / Autumn thing of a book narrating current events almost in real time before either Smith or Laing did."



Ahem:

https://www.goodreads.com/comment/sho...


Gumble's Yard - Golden Reviewer | 5087 comments Ang wrote: Ahem:..."

So basically

- Olivia Laing steals an idea that Gordon Burn did previously, and pretends its original

- Paul steals an idea from Ang saying that "Olivia Laing steals an idea that Gordon Burn did previously, and pretends its original" and pretends its original

Or has someone already posted to say that?


message 14: by Val (new)

Val | 1016 comments I think we can excuse Ali Smith stealing the idea, on the grounds of doing so brilliantly (even though I didn't get enough of the references to play bingo).


message 15: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments But you can't excuse Paul, is that what you are saying :-)


message 16: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Moving along swiftly - and nicely timed - the longlist is out.

And the first of I hope many nominations for Lanny (and nice to see Wendy Erksine from the RoC list):

Lanny by Max Porter

Sweet Home by Wendy Erskine

The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker

Lowborn: Growing Up, Getting Away and Returning to Britain’s Poorest Towns by
Kerry Hudson

The Vogue by Eoin McNamee

Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

For The Good Times by David Keenan

Heads of the Colored People by Naffissa Thompson-Spires

Chamber Music: Enter the Wu-Tang by Will Ashon

Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss.

This Brutal House by Niven Govinden

Heart Berries by Terese Marie Mailhot


message 17: by Antonomasia (new)

Antonomasia | 2632 comments Nice seeing a few new ones appear.

Realised I'm tired of some of these already, just from seeing them around (especially on GR) even though their press/awards season hasn't actually started yet, e.g. Lanny (which I probably will read anyway), The Vogue.


message 18: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments I suspect - and certainly hope - you are going to hear a lot more of Lanny.


message 19: by Val (new)

Val | 1016 comments Paul wrote: "But you can't excuse Paul, is that what you are saying :-)"
No.
Stirrer!


message 20: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 4339 comments I’m so happy Lanny is nominated for a prize.


message 21: by Paul (last edited Jul 17, 2019 03:03AM) (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Shortlist:

Lanny by Max Porter

The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker

Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

For The Good Times by David Keenan

Heads of the Colored People by Naffissa Thompson-Spires

This Brutal House by Niven Govinden

Lanny marches on. A little surprised Silence of the Girls also does - irrespective of its merits, it didn't seem that innovative, although perhaps the deliberate historical anomalies (the WW1 references) mark it out.


message 22: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 4339 comments There were WWI references??


message 23: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments The description of the siege based on WW1 trench warfare with deliberate anomalies such as field hospitals. They also sing a 20th century rugby drinking song at one point. see Gumble Yard’s review.


message 24: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments And the 2019 winner is .................

For The Good Times by David Keenan


message 25: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Longlist out for one of my favourite prizes (with a similar aim to Goldsmiths but including non-fiction)

Jenn Ashworth, Notes Made While Falling (Goldsmiths Press)

Luke Brown, Theft (And Other Stories)

Garth Greenwell, Cleanness (Picador)

Kirstin Innes, Scabby Queen (4th Estate)

Mark Lanegan, Sing Backwards and Weep (White Rabbit)

Casey Legler, Godspeed (Scribe)

Paul Mendez, Rainbow Milk (Dialogue)

Jenny Offill, Weather (Granta)

Deborah Orr, Motherwell (W&N)

Peter Pomerantsev, This Is Not Propaganda (Faber)

Lemn Sissay, My Name Is Why (Canongate)

Lisa Taddeo, Three Women (Bloomsbury)


message 26: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Of which I've read precisely zero.

I listen to a lot of Mark Lanegan's music though - here's him at his best https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PE5f5...


message 27: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments One from the Women's Prize
One from a 2020 Booker judge
One from a former "Not the Booker" winner


message 28: by Robert (new)

Robert | 1960 comments I am becoming a big fan of this prize - So far I'm going through the winners and afterwards I'll work on the shortlists - mind you I already have most of the titles so it won't take long to catch up


message 29: by Robert (last edited Jun 17, 2020 04:02AM) (new)

Robert | 1960 comments Paul wrote: "Of which I've read precisely zero.

I listen to a lot of Mark Lanegan's music though - here's him at his best https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PE5f5..."


Yup same here. I like his folky stuff too - he released a new album a month ago.


message 30: by Robert (new)

Robert | 1960 comments On another note - How come I can't find a hardback copy of Rainbow Milk? both blackwells and Bookdepo are featuring the paperback? (forget Amazon - postage is steep)


message 31: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Isn't that a good thing - or do you prefer hardbacks


message 32: by Robert (new)

Robert | 1960 comments Paul wrote: "Isn't that a good thing - or do you prefer hardbacks"

Generally I buy the big sized paperback (easy on the eyes) but the only paperback publishing date is April 2021 - strange.


message 33: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments ah understood - Foyles and Waterstones both have but not sure of their overseas postage rates - Bookdepo has the obvious advantage of cross subsidising postage.


message 34: by Robert (new)

Robert | 1960 comments Foyles’ postage is terrible- I’ve never tried waterstones though


message 35: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 4339 comments This does sound like a good prize to follow.


message 36: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Shortlist (http://gordonburnprize.com/shortlist/)

Jenn Ashworth, Notes Made While Falling (Goldsmiths Press)

Deborah Orr, Motherwell (W&N)

Paul Mendez, Rainbow Milk (Dialogue)

Lisa Taddeo, Three Women (Bloomsbury)

Peter Pomerantsev, This Is Not Propaganda (Faber)

Lemn Sissay, My Name Is Why (Canongate)


message 37: by Robert (last edited Jul 23, 2020 06:43AM) (new)

Robert | 1960 comments Great - I've got My name and three women on the tbr stack.

I just bought the Pomerantsev - totally outside my comfort zone but when the Gordon Prize judges pick non-fiction, I'll like it


message 38: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Winner announcement will be 15 October at a digital event on 15 October 2020 at Durham Book Festival


message 39: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments A likely contender for next year - and for the 2021 Goldsmiths - David Keenan (2019 winner, 2017 shortlist) has a new novel coming out - Xstabeth

Pre-orders of the book also comes with a free e-copy of a prequel novella (which sounds as if it will only ever be made available to those that pre-order):

https://www.whiterabbitbooks.co.uk/im...


message 40: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 4339 comments That sounds like a must-read.

I need to quit working to have enough time to read all that I want to read and I need a 2nd job to pay for all the books I want to buy! Or I need to develop the ability to function with no need of sleep or food.


Gumble's Yard - Golden Reviewer | 5087 comments I have only ever twice physically abandoned a book - deliberately left it in a public place for someone else to read as I just had no interest - and one was a David Keenan novel.


message 42: by Robert (new)

Robert | 1960 comments When I first heard that Keenan was a novelist, it took me by surprise- he wrote a book called England’s Hidden Reverse, which is the holy grail among music journalists as it goes in and out print quickly.


message 43: by Tommi (new)

Tommi | 486 comments For the Good Times was probably the best English-original novel I read last year. I remember being bummed it wasn’t longlisted for the Booker, but the Gordon Burn win compensated a little! Looking forward to Xstabeth.


message 44: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Announcement and readings of shortlist from this on on 15th October 8-9pm UK time - live webcast, for which you can register in advance

https://durhambookfestival.com/progra...


message 45: by Paul (last edited Oct 15, 2020 12:54PM) (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Readings and author's talking about their books live now:

https://www.crowdcast.io/e/the-announ...

For those who miss it - clips are on Twitter here

https://twitter.com/durhambookfest


message 46: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments And the winner is ...

Peter Pomerantsev, This Is Not Propaganda (Faber)


message 47: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments I assume the 2021 longlist should be due out some time soon.

Judges this year: Denise Mina has been appointed as the new chair of the judges of the Gordon Burn Prize. Along with literary journalist and editor Sian Cain, novelist and short story writer Irenosen Okojie, and writer and poet Derek Owusu, she will judge the Gordon Burn Prize 2021.

Derek - as a judge, any update on when the longlist is due?


message 48: by Robert (new)

Robert | 1960 comments Paul wrote: "I assume the 2021 longlist should be due out some time soon.

Judges this year: Denise Mina has been appointed as the new chair of the judges of the Gordon Burn Prize. Along with literary journalis..."


This is slowly becoming a fave prize - I like the scope of their longlists.


message 49: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 8234 comments Yes I really like the prize


message 50: by WndyJW (new)

WndyJW | 4339 comments This prize hasn’t been on my radar, but looking at past longlists and winners it should be.


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