The Readers Review: Literature from 1714 to 1910 discussion

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2016/17 Group Reads - Archives > Nominations - November 2016

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message 1: by Gem , Moderator (new)

Gem  Paullin | 749 comments Mod
Nominations for November are now open.

Please remember that the book should fit our time period, 1800-1910. Each member can nominate one book that has not been read by the group in the last two years. Nomination thread will be closed in one week or when eight books have been nominated - whichever comes first.

On a personal note the end of November begins the holiday craziness around here. In order not to compound that I'd like to limit the length of the nominations to nor more than about 400 pages maximum.


message 2: by Rosemarie, Moderator (last edited Oct 06, 2016 11:17AM) (new)

Rosemarie | 2893 comments Mod
I would like to nominate The Country of the Pointed Firs by Sarah Orne Jewett. It is a collection of related stories about people living in a New England town. The mood in the stories is
mellow, with likeable characters, which makes the book a good break from rushing around all day.


message 3: by Frances, Moderator (new)

Frances (francesab) | 1870 comments Mod
I'll nominate The Awakening by Kate Chopin.


message 4: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Hmmm, we've never read any Kipling. The man Henry James called "the most complete man of genius, as distinct from fine intelligence, that I have ever known." The first English Language writer to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature (1907), and still the youngest recipient to date (he received it at age 42).

He has gone into and out of favor over the years, but according to Douglas Kerr, "as the age of the European empires recedes, he is recognised as an incomparable, if controversial, interpreter of how empire was experienced. That, and an increasing recognition of his extraordinary narrative gifts, make him a force to be reckoned with."

Isn't it time we encountered him?

I'll nominate his great novel of India, Kim


message 5: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 675 comments Great idea, E’man! Several good nominations here already.


message 6: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2893 comments Mod
I have read Kim not that long ago. I thought it was a really enjoyable book to read.


message 7: by Pragya (new)

Pragya | 2 comments The Awakening has been on my agenda for some time. I would second that.


message 8: by Dianne (new)

Dianne | 91 comments these nominations look great so far! I"ll throw Silas Marner by George Eliot into the nomination mix.


message 9: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2893 comments Mod
I will definitely second that. In fact, all the books look like good choices!


message 10: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 1 comments I would recommend Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe (I can not get my links to work on my phone sorry).


message 11: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Leslie wrote: "I would recommend Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe (I can not get my links to work on my phone sorry)."

Uncle Tom's Cabin


message 12: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2893 comments Mod
Another good book.


message 13: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Rosemarie wrote: "Another good book."

If you're referring to Uncle Tom's Cabin, have you actually read it?

Tastes differ, of course, but I worked my way through much but not all of it with great difficulty. I know historically it's a very important book. But as a novel ... well, as I say, tastes differ!


message 14: by Rosemarie, Moderator (new)

Rosemarie | 2893 comments Mod
I read Uncle Tom's Cabin and actually enjoyed it, but it is long. Once you get over the dramatic tone of the writing, you realize that the novel has a serious message. Another of Harriet Beecher Stowe's novels, The Minister's Wooing, is on a lighter note.

As you say, Everyman, we all have different tastes-- and that is a good thing.


message 15: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4487 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "I read Uncle Tom's Cabin and actually enjoyed it, but it is long. Once you get over the dramatic tone of the writing, you realize that the novel has a serious message. Another of Harriet Beecher St..."

It appears to be longer than the page limit Gem set. It's her call whether to include it or not


message 16: by Lori, Moderator (new)

Lori Goshert (lori_laleh) | 1369 comments Mod
Henry James has some shorter novels. The American, maybe? It's just at 400 pages.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...

(Daisy Miller is half that size, if you really want something short)


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