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Book and Film Discussions > Writers and readers - tell us why you LoVe your genre!

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Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments When did you fall in love with your favorite genre(s) and what keeps you coming back for more?


message 2: by Ric (new)

Ric Santos | 0 comments I've always enjoyed fiction/sci-fi because there are no rules. I can create what I want and who I want and it makes sense within that realm.

While there are silly stories within the genre, I want to be part of those who create a serious story within the fantasy everyone can believe in and not just take as another weird sci-fi tale.


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Ric wrote: "I've always enjoyed fiction/sci-fi because there are no rules. I can create what I want and who I want and it makes sense within that realm.

While there are silly stories within the genre, I want..."


Well said. We often admire the things in others that we ourselves cannot accomplish. I greatly admire and am a bit mystified by science fiction writers because the world building is so elaborate at times and the creativity build around technology is fascinating to me. The reading public should be very glad that I have no desire to write it LOL, but I love reading it.


 Alex ~They/them~ ~Annabeth Chase and Alex Fierro are the best~ (percybluefood) | 145 comments I enjoy Fantasy/Dystopian, because they are kind of like an escape from reality for me, and I love visiting all of those other worlds, even tho it's not real and I'm really interested into magic, and all those mythical creatures- well it's real within your imagination, but still....and I enjoy sci-fi, because it's interesting, and I enjoy supernatural, because I'm interested in all those creatures and stuff and I enjoy romance, well it's kind of a love-hate relationship with romance, I like romance, because it's kind of interesting, and cute. And I hate it because it kind of makes love seem easy sometimes, and irl love is really complicated. I enjoy Mystery/thriller, because I love all those adventures, and stuff, and irl I'd always wanted an adventure, and I'd been interested in mysteries for a long time. I enjoy Realistic fiction, because it makes me think that I'm not really alone with all the real life stuff. As for horror, I haven't really read any books that are in horror yet, but I'm planning to just try horror


message 5: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin I always loved science-fiction because it allows someone to let his/her imagination run wild. Since my imagination is like a volcano in constant eruption, I decided to concentrate on writing science-fiction. I also happen to love history, which was why I write so much time travel and historical fiction novels. When I do, I am very scrupulous about respecting historical facts as much as possible.


message 6: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7211 comments When I was a kid I was really into science and science fiction, much more than any other genre. As an adult I branched out into fantasy big time and horror to a lesser extent. Now I'm half way between all three.

The key motivations were to satisfy a sense of wonder and imagination - I love big ideas - and to escape the everyday mundane world that I found difficult to fit into.

Now I write what I love to read.


message 7: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13426 comments As a fan of action with humorous undertone, I believe Tarantino needs a little more competition, because the pauses between the movies are long and he's declared retiring soon and coming to compete in literary world-:)


message 8: by Jen Pattison (new)

Jen Pattison | 409 comments I love reading historical fiction because it helps me to imagine what my ancestors' lives were like, and to understand how things came to be in the present. For writing, I can't write fiction as I don't have a creative/imaginative cell in my body, so non-fiction allows me to stick to researched facts and my opinions.


Leviathan Libraries (leviathanlibraries) Sci-Fi gives me hope for the human race.

Horror gives me a chance to get out all my anger/fear/rage/despair in a safe fashion.


message 10: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9467 comments I write Sci-fi and thrillers, because that is what I like reading, but with the Sci-fi, I like to try to keep the background plausible. Thus when I have gone into interstellar travel, I keep within the boundaries of Einstein's relativity, and in my opinion, the time dilation effect permits stories that are just a interesting as others. Thus when you set off for another star, and when you return, everyone you knew before will be dead. That gives room for quite a few twists to the story. But I also hope to try to show what scientific thinking involves, and no, it does not, or should not, mean diving into mathematics. (Eventually you have to, but that can safely be left out of stories.)


message 11: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin The incoming movie PASSENGERS, with Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, should be of great interest to you Ian, as it is about two passengers of an interstellar liner waking up too early from cryogenic sleep and finding themselves the only ones awake aboard their ship. I believe that it opens in December. It is on my MUST LIST.


message 12: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9467 comments Michel wrote: "The incoming movie PASSENGERS, with Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, should be of great interest to you Ian, as it is about two passengers of an interstellar liner waking up too early from cryoge..."

I shall have to keep an eye out for that, thanks.


message 13: by Zee (new)

Zee Monodee (zee_monodee) | 0 comments I love romance because of the hope it provides that there will always be a HEA - that struggles and everything do bring you to a better place.

I like chick-lit because it is light and fluffy and funny, and I often need a break and a laugh so this is my total indulgence moment.

Non-fiction - I gravitate a lot towards nutrition (I believe food can make a huge difference in our health), and also memoirs, because I love seeing how other people live, how they experience life, how they come through - basically, the resilience of the human mind and heart.


message 14: by Lucy (new)

Lucy Banks | 18 comments Such a good question! I love fantasy / magical realism as it's always a joy to dip out of reality for a while, and to see just how far the author's imagination can take them - the more 'far-out' the better.

I also enjoy a good horror novel, simply because I think it's such an art-form to write something that genuinely scares (but captivates at the same time - that's the important bit!). And the same applies to comedy - for the same reasons; it's incredibly difficult to write something that actually makes people laugh out loud.


message 15: by Frank (new)

Frank Ryan (frankryan) | 14 comments It must seem unusual that, as a physician and biological scientist, I enjoy writing epic fantasy. But then, if you look back at several well known names in the category, they often involve people who come from academic backgrounds. Why do I love fantasy? Well, part of it derives from the fact is something close to the opposite of the clinical fact-derived reality of my background. But after writing both thrillers and contemporary fiction, I experience a wonderful release in fantasy. Writer, and reader, are invited to explore a world one could never enter in real life. The rules are changed. It isn't that there are no rules. The fantasy world must involve rules, albeit they may be very different from any that exist in the real world. That means that writer and reader can enjoy an extraordinary odyssey in the company of beings they would never meet in reality. One can fly, explore the oceans or stars, fight battles with ogres and other monsters, be subject to and employ magical powers and weapons. As writer, you can make it as complex or simple as you like, create flowing prose or simple direct prose - you are not quite as hidebound as a writer of many other categories. Yet, in the sort of fantasy I write, deep characterization is as important as it is in contemporary fiction. This latter is particularly important to my creativity.

Does it help that I come from a world in which I have treated large numbers of people and have studied human evolution, including the human genome, in depth? Yes. This provides many ideas for novelty. But then I would imagine that many other backgrounds would also provide novelties that I would never think about.

Fantasy can be terrifying, or fun, sexy or spiritually exalting. All of this makes it a liberating experience for a writer.


message 16: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7211 comments Hi Frank,

Well said.

Cheers Graeme


message 17: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2144 comments Lilyn G. (Scifi and Scary) wrote: "Sci-Fi gives me hope for the human race.

Horror gives me a chance to get out all my anger/fear/rage/despair in a safe fashion."


This.

Horror was my genre of choice when I was younger. It's almost cliched now that "deviant behavior" is punished, but on a broader and very general scale, the victims almost "deserve" their fate - even if their "crimes" are silly by societal standards and people don't really deserve to die for smoking a joint. It's more the message behind it that you live a just life and you're going to make it. The survivor character is usually a tale of power and triumph. Maybe it's an allegory for what you want to see in real life: those who take the easy way don't make it, but put in the effort and fight, and you succeed.

I know there is a train of thought in recent times that horror is an allegory for homosexuality with the survivor character mirroring the struggle gays have as they grow up and start to realize they're not like everyone else. That struggle to survive in the story is almost a mirror to the struggle to come to grips with that sexuality and the ultimate decision to accept it and even come out of the closet.


message 18: by Anna (new)

Anna Chant | 16 comments I love historical fiction because it lets me get to know the real people who helped shape our world. Factual history often doesn't get into the character's skin in a way that historical fiction can. When writing I always feel that my characters found me, rather than me creating my characters. I love getting to know them and always find it strange after a good writing or reading session to find myself back in the 21st century!


message 19: by Alexander (new)

Alexander Engel-Hodgkinson (nexus_engel) | 52 comments The speculative/cyberpunk subgenre in science fiction, because it is without borders or boundaries, where anything is possible. ;)

I first stumbled upon it when fourteen-year-old me found DVD copies of Akira and Ghost in the Shell in my brother's friend's movie stash (with his permission, of course) and decided to give them a watch. Both films stayed with me for a very long time, eventually prompting me to look more into the subject, which has led to me becoming another in a long, long list of contributors in that literary genre. Its bleakness and high-and-low contrasts in society and technology fascinate me, as well as its anti-authority/anti-corporate themes (among other themes, like existentialism and nihilism). Its imagery, aesthetics and atmosphere are perfect--they inspire thought and they look nice doing it.


message 20: by Zee (new)

Zee Monodee (zee_monodee) | 0 comments Anna wrote: "I love historical fiction because it lets me get to know the real people who helped shape our world. Factual history often doesn't get into the character's skin in a way that historical fiction can..."

I am totally with you on that, Anna! A lot of the history I know came from reading historical fiction, then prompting me to do my research on the topic if I liked it. I discovered so much about the Tudors (Phillippa Gregory, of course! These books were great The Constant Princess (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #6) by Philippa Gregory The Other Boleyn Girl (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #9) by Philippa Gregory )
Then there was Marie Antoinette Becoming Marie Antoinette (Marie Antoinette, #1) by Juliet Grey
Another one that had me absolutely enthralled and discovering Russian history was this book The Winter Palace A Novel of Catherine the Great (Catherine, #1) by Eva Stachniak


message 21: by Codex (new)

Codex Regius (codex_regius) | 26 comments My parents were avid SF/F-readers, so I definitely got it from them. Living within range of the Upper-Germanic Limes, you also cannot avoid becoming attracted by Romans, so I read Rosemary Sutcliffe as a boy and enjoyed these old monumental movies, like Ben Hur. When I realised that no one has written about the area I live in as it was in the Roman Age, I decided to fill the gap, though ultimately the scope of the series became rather universal. Currently, being a dedicated amateur astronomer, I am more interested in writing science books about the dwarf planets and other minor worlds of the Solar System.


message 22: by Daniel J. (new)

Daniel J. Nickolas (danieljnickolas) | 111 comments Lilyn G. (Scifi and Scary) wrote: "Sci-Fi gives me hope for the human race."

While Science Fiction is not my preferred genre (I say that with the realization that I am dangerously unread in that genre) I remember as a younger person having concerns about the world and where it was headed (Y2K was a serious concern when I was a fifth grader, and the September 11th attacks happened my seventh grade year); I also remember watching episodes of Star Trek Voyager every week and thinking "maybe we'll make it after all."


message 23: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) I write in three genres(Poetry, Horror and Crime) and I love them all for specific reasons.

Poetry- I've loved poetry since I was a freshman in high school. I remember reading poetry and having to do an assignment with it and I just understood it and enjoyed writing poetry. After a while I found myself writing poetry during classes that weren't even English class and I even wrote poetry outside of class. Soon poetry became a part of my life as I wrote poems whenever I got the chance and I wrote about anything I could be inspired by whether I saw it, felt it or was influenced by it. I still am till this day and I still enjoy poetry as much as I did the day I was introduced to it.

Horror- I'm normally not one to like something because everyone else likes it but I feel horror is one of the few exceptions to the rule. I started to love horror around the same time I started to love poetry but I really found an appreciation for it after I started writing more. The more I wrote the more I found that people really dig horror and seeing as they dug it I felt if I can contribute to it then why not enjoy it? So I started watching horror shows and films more and most of all just writing more. The more I've accumulated the more I've appreciated and the more I've appreciated the move I've come to love.

Crime- I'm not at the love stage for the genre but I'm at a great acceptance and enjoyment of it. I have come to enjoy it so much solely because of the research I had to do for my latest novel Opium Warfare which meant not only researching the town but knowing how to study and know what makes a good crime novel. So all that really had made me enjoy the genre of crime.


message 24: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13426 comments Justin wrote: "Opium Warfare which meant not only researching the town but knowing how to study and know what makes a good crime novel..."

Hope you didn't have to join a gang..... for the benefit of the book, of course -:)


message 25: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) Nope, no gang lol


message 26: by Melonie (new)

Melonie Purcell | 14 comments I write and read in SF/F because there are no rules. Anything can happen. I feel like I am living a SF book right now with these elections in the States, but in the book, I would be holding out for an alien invasion or the faeries to come out and get it all sorted. In a way, reading SF/F is like hoping to win the lottery. It could happen. And if it did...


message 27: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7211 comments Hi Melonie,

The challenge with writing Sci-Fi/Fantasy ect is staying internally consistent within the story.

Lots of rules then, but self imposed ones.

What do you think?


message 28: by Melonie (new)

Melonie Purcell | 14 comments Graeme, I totally agree with that. Holy cats! I have a story bible for each series that is indexed and thousands of words long. Any time I make up a word or a name or a rule, it goes in there. And when I am writing, rather than stop and go look it up in my bible, I just put asterisks to mark the spot. It works for me.


message 29: by Joanne (new)

Joanne I love fantasy most. I like escapism. I don't want to be bothered with the world's problems when I read. I am barrages with them enough. I also steer away from reading a lot of sex and violence because it upsets me and makes me anxious.


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