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The Bluest Eye
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2016 Group Reads > October Read: The Bluest Eye

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capsaicine | 92 comments Hey everybody! It's unanimous! This month we'll be reading and discussing The Bluest Eye, written by Nobel Prize laureate, Toni Morrison, in celebration of Nobel Prizes being released this week. Who's in?


message 2: by kisha, The Clean Up Lady (new) - rated it 5 stars

kisha | 3907 comments Mod
Awesome! I love this book. I'm definitely down for a reread. It's a quick read too.


message 3: by Brina (new)

Brina I will read if i can clear schedule. 2 days of holidays done, 5 left.


message 4: by Carol (new) - added it

Carol (carolfromnc) | 4436 comments I'm very excited for this one. Placing a hold at the library now...


message 5: by Lulu, The Book Reader who could. (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lulu (lulureads365) | 2489 comments Mod
I love this book! I'll be reading along


message 6: by Brina (new)

Brina Library has my copy :)


capsaicine | 92 comments Hey everybody! Here's a tentative schedule for our reading and discussion:

Second week of October: Autumn & Winter
Third week of October: Spring
Fourth week of October: Summer

I'm excited for this re-read!


message 8: by kisha, The Clean Up Lady (new) - rated it 5 stars

kisha | 3907 comments Mod
I'm so excited!!!


message 9: by Brina (new)

Brina I will try my hardest to keep up with my holidays and the baseball playoffs. Getting my copy on Monday and I will see how much I can read each week.


message 10: by Trudy (new) - added it

Trudy (goodreadscomtrudyspages) | 414 comments I read it many years ago. I would enjoy a reread. The kindle edition has narration by Toni, herself.


message 11: by Carol (new) - added it

Carol (carolfromnc) | 4436 comments Trudy wrote: "I read it many years ago. I would enjoy a reread. The kindle edition has narration by Toni, herself."

Oh, man. I may have to listen to that just because, although I will definitely read a hard copy.


message 12: by Lulu, The Book Reader who could. (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lulu (lulureads365) | 2489 comments Mod
When will we be starting?


capsaicine | 92 comments Whenever you're ready! Let's get the discussion going! Feel free to express your thoughts and reflect on Autumn and Winter this week. Also, some thoughts to ponder:

What do you think the marigolds which did not blossom in the fall of 1941 symbolize?

What do you think Morrison implies when she writes that the
Breedloves' ugliness "did not belong to them?"


message 14: by kisha, The Clean Up Lady (new) - rated it 5 stars

kisha | 3907 comments Mod
"What do you think the marigolds which did not blossom in the fall of 1941 symbolize?
"

I think it symbolized the darkness that was to come. It set the tone of this novel...or at least "fall". Marigold's symbolizes sunlight because it is dependent on sunlight to bloom.


Anastasia Kinderman | 942 comments I would love to read along, I just need to find the time. I'm so behind.


message 16: by Brina (new)

Brina I can start tomorrow. I will try to read over Friday night and Saturday which is my unplugged time. Looking forward!


message 17: by Lulu, The Book Reader who could. (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lulu (lulureads365) | 2489 comments Mod
I kinda forgot how "heavy" this novel is.


message 18: by A.D. (new)

A.D. Koboah (adkoboah) | 261 comments Leona wrote: "Whenever you're ready! Let's get the discussion going! Feel free to express your thoughts and reflect on Autumn and Winter this week. Also, some thoughts to ponder:

What do you think the marigolds..."


I think the marigolds not blossoming signifies that something unnatural or something that goes against the natural order of things is taking place. The first few pages of the novel seem to suggest that. She starts off the novel a bit like a child's story or a fairy tale and in the next paragraph she disrupts that by taking away the full stops to show that something is disrupting that fairy tale or child's story and in the third paragrah she takes away the spaces so that it becames quite frenetic and doesnt make much sense to show that something completely unnatural is happening or that something has completely broken down. Even when she mentions the marigolds she compounds that sense of the unnatural, or a loss of innocence, by comparing the two little girls planting the seeds in dirt with Breedlove planting his seed in Pecola's dirt.

I think maybe by saying that the Breedlove's ugliness did not belong to them suggests the impact that maybe slavery or oppression has in creating dysfunction.

I agree, Lulu it is quite heavy and quite difficult reading at times.


Anastasia Kinderman | 942 comments I got the book, now for time to read it!


message 20: by Lulu, The Book Reader who could. (last edited Oct 25, 2016 11:32AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lulu (lulureads365) | 2489 comments Mod
I'm about 60% through this book, listening to the audio version by Toni Morrison. I love the innocence of the three girls (Freda, Claudia, and Pecola).

I'm intrigued by Pecola's love for Shirley Temple versus that of Claudia's disgust for Shirley Temple and the destruction of the white baby dolls.

How did Claudia's outlook become so different than those around her?

We know that Pecola longs to have blue eyes, so she can be considered beautiful and therefore loved, but where did this mentality come from? Is it because she is so much darker than everyone around her?


message 21: by A.D. (new)

A.D. Koboah (adkoboah) | 261 comments I love the girl's innocence as well. I think Pecola's love for Shirley Temple versus's Claudia's disgust come from the fact that they are picking up on the same thing, but one of them believes it and the other doesn't. And that is what the world around them is telling them about white girls - that white girls are loved and valued but black girls aren't. Pecola loves Shirley Temple because she is unloved and and unvalued and believes what she is told through the actions of those around them, that white girls should be loved and valued. But Claudia doesn't believe it yet so she is disgusted by it. But Claudia does end up believing it.

I read the book ages ago and this is a re-read. I started the first chapter and then stopped as I didn't know if anyone else had started reading the book yet, but does Toni Morrison give a clear description of anyone other than Maureen Peal? There isn't a clear descripton of the girls or their mother yet and I think it might be deliberate as it is as if they could be any of us.


message 22: by Lulu, The Book Reader who could. (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lulu (lulureads365) | 2489 comments Mod
mmm...that is a very good point A.D., there isn't a clear description.


message 23: by A.D. (new)

A.D. Koboah (adkoboah) | 261 comments I've just finished reading the chapter in which she tells us a bit more about the Breedloves and she does give a description of Pecola, but it isn't an individual description of her but one of her and her family as a whole. I loved Toni Morrison's description of (view spoiler)


message 24: by Lulu, The Book Reader who could. (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lulu (lulureads365) | 2489 comments Mod
Lol! Yes I laughed at that as well. (view spoiler)


message 25: by A.D. (new)

A.D. Koboah (adkoboah) | 261 comments It is such heavy stuff and very difficult reading at times. (view spoiler)


message 26: by Harlem Duke (new) - added it

Harlem Duke | 3 comments When I saw "The Bluest Eye" was on the October reading list, I immediately went to my book case and found my old copy. I read this years ago, so re-reading this will be a nice refresher. I just joined the group a couple of days ago, so I have to do double-time to catch up as the month is almost over. I'm up to the part where Claudia admits to having the impulse to do to little white girls, what she does to the white dolls. It doesn't take a psychologist to understand her feelings. She is surrounded by a world where white is considered better. They have better lives. Being exposed to these conditions can breed one of two feelings, hate or admiration.


message 27: by A.D. (new)

A.D. Koboah (adkoboah) | 261 comments Welcome to the group, Harlem.

I agree, being exposed to those conditions does breed hate or admiration. I like the fact that Toni Morrison brings humour into parts of the novel despite the difficult subject matter. (view spoiler)


message 28: by A.D. (new)

A.D. Koboah (adkoboah) | 261 comments I've nearly finished the book now. (view spoiler)


message 29: by Lulu, The Book Reader who could. (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lulu (lulureads365) | 2489 comments Mod
Toni Morrison said Pecola was too passive to tell her own story, that's why Claudia and Freda told it.

It's sad that those who truly could help Pecola didn't (the adults), and the ones who wanted to (Claudia and Freda) couldn't.


message 30: by A.D. (new)

A.D. Koboah (adkoboah) | 261 comments Yeah, it was so sad that the adults weren't even sympathetic to Pecola at all. I got a bit tearful when I read the last chapter describing Pecola whenever the girls saw her. The other thing was that even the hallucination/voice that Pecola spoke to wasn't particularly sympathetic to her either at times. It was a very sad book.


message 31: by Lulu, The Book Reader who could. (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lulu (lulureads365) | 2489 comments Mod
I agree.


capsaicine | 92 comments Reflecting on the setting of the book, the time in which it was written, and present day, what do you think has changed or remained the same with regards to the racism and colorism addressed in The Bluest Eye?


message 33: by Lulu, The Book Reader who could. (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lulu (lulureads365) | 2489 comments Mod
In all honesty....I don't think anything has changed.


message 34: by A.D. (new)

A.D. Koboah (adkoboah) | 261 comments Unfortunately I don't think much has changed either.


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