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Monthly Book Suggestions > November Bonus- National Adoption Month

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message 1: by Mariah Roze (last edited Oct 03, 2016 04:34AM) (new)

Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1370 comments Mod
Hi Everyone! Please poster your book suggestions here for National Adoption Month :) This will be open till 10/13/16.


message 2: by Mariah Roze (new)

Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1370 comments Mod
Stephanie wrote: "I've read and would recommend Orphan Train. Sorry on phone so can't link."

Loveeeed that book! That is one of my suggestions too!


message 3: by David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party (last edited Oct 03, 2016 10:46AM) (new)

David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party | 63 comments I'm at work right now, but I'm being bad and doing a quick search for adoption books on company time! Shhh...please don't tell my boss! ;)

This sounds like a compelling fiction book starring an adopted girl:
How to Save a Life by Sara Zarr How to Save a Life

If people would like to go nonfiction instead, this is rated as an excellent resource for people looking into adoption:

Adoption Nation How The Adoption Revolution Is Transforming America by Adam Pertman Adoption Nation How The Adoption Revolution Is Transforming America

I'll look for more when I get off of work. Hope this helps! :)


message 4: by Mariah Roze (new)

Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1370 comments Mod
David "proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party" wrote: "I'm at work right now, but I'm being bad and doing a quick search for adoption books on company time! Shhh...please don't tell my boss! ;)

This sounds like a compelling fiction book starring an ad..."


Ohhhh good picks!

Question! Is the How to Save a Life book the one that goes with the movie How to Save a Life? or are they completely different?


David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party | 63 comments Mariah wrote: "Ohhhh good picks!

Question! Is the How to Save a Life book the one that goes with the movie How to Save a Life? or are they completely different? "


I just Wikipedia-ed it, it looks like the movie and book are actually not connected. When I looked again, though, I did notice that I have a lot of GR friends who gave the book 5 stars! That's promising! :D


message 6: by Mariah Roze (new)

Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1370 comments Mod
David "proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party" wrote: "Mariah wrote: "Ohhhh good picks!

Question! Is the How to Save a Life book the one that goes with the movie How to Save a Life? or are they completely different? "

I just Wikipedia-ed it, it looks..."



Ohhhh that is a really good sign!! :)


message 7: by Mariah Roze (new)

Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1370 comments Mod
Here are my suggestions :)

Three Little Words by Ashley Rhodes-Courter
Three Little Words by Ashley Rhodes-Courter
"Sunshine, you're my baby and I'm your only mother. You must mind the one taking care of you, but she's not your mama." Ashley Rhodes-Courter spent nine years of her life in fourteen different foster homes, living by those words. As her mother spirals out of control, Ashley is left clinging to an unpredictable, dissolving relationship, all the while getting pulled deeper and deeper into the foster care system. Painful memories of being taken away from her home quickly become consumed by real-life horrors, where Ashley is juggled between caseworkers, shuffled from school to school, and forced to endure manipulative,humiliating treatment from a very abusive foster family. In this inspiring, unforgettable memoir, Ashley finds the courage to succeed - and in doing so, discovers the power of her own voice.

Another Place at the Table by Kathy Harrison
Another Place at the Table by Kathy Harrison
For more than a decade, Kathy Harrison has sheltered a shifting cast of troubled youngsters-the offspring of prostitutes and addicts; the sons and daughters of abusers; and teenage parents who aren't equipped for parenthood. All this, in addition to raising her three biological sons and two adopted daughters. What would motivate someone to give herself over to constant, largely uncompensated chaos? For Harrison, the answer is easy. Another Place at the Table is the story of life at our social services' front lines, centered on three children who, when they come together in Harrison's home, nearly destroy it. It is the frank first-person story of a woman whose compassionate best intentions for a child are sometimes all that stand between violence and redemption.

Choosing to SEE by Mary Beth Chapman
Choosing to SEE by Mary Beth Chapman
Mary Beth Chapman is the wife of Grammy and Dove Award winning recording artist Steven Curtis Chapman. Together they began Show Hope, a nonprofit organization dedicated to caring for the world's most vulnerable children by providing financial assistance to families wishing to adopt, as well as increasing awareness of the orphan crisis and funneling resources to orphans domestically and internationally. Mary Beth serves as president of Show Hope and is a speaker for Women of Faith 2010 with her husband. She is also coauthor with Steven of the Shaoey and Dot series of children's picture books. Mary Beth and Steven have six children: Emily, Caleb, Will Franklin, and adopted daughters Shaohannah Hope, Stevey Joy, and Maria Sue, who is now with Jesus. The Chapmans live in Tennessee.

The Kid What Happened After My Boyfriend and I Decided to Go Get Pregnant by Dan Savage
The Kid: What Happened After My Boyfriend and I Decided to Go Get Pregnant by Dan Savage
Dan Savage's nationally syndicated sex advice column, "Savage Love," enrages and excites more than four million people each week. In The Kid, Savage tells a no-holds-barred, high-energy story of an ordinary American couple who wants to have a baby. Except that in this case the couple happens to be Dan and his boyfriend. That fact, in the face of a society enormously uneasy with gay adoption, makes for an edgy, entertaining, and illuminating read. When Dan and his boyfriend are finally presented with an infant badly in need of parenting, they find themselves caught up in a drama that extends well beyond the confines of their immediate world. A story about confronting homophobia, falling in love, getting older, and getting a little bit smarter, The Kid is a book about the very human desire to have a family.

Geisha, a Life by Mineko Iwasaki
Geisha, a Life by Mineko Iwasaki, Rande Brown
Celebrated as the most successful geisha of her generation, Mineko Iwasaki was only five years old when she left her parents' home for the world of the geisha. For the next twenty-five years, she would live a life filled with extraordinary professional demands and rich rewards. She would learn the formal customs and language of the geisha, and study the ancient arts of Japanese dance and music. She would enchant kings and princes, captains of industry, and titans of the entertainment world, some of whom would become her dearest friends. Through great pride and determination, she would be hailed as one of the most prized geishas in Japan's history, and one of the last great practitioners of this now fading art form. In Geisha, a Life, Mineko Iwasaki tells her story, from her warm early childhood, to her intense yet privileged upbringing in the Iwasaki okiya (household), to her years as a renowned geisha, and finally, to her decision at the age of twenty-nine to retire and marry, a move that would mirror the demise of geisha culture. Mineko brings to life the beauty and wonder of Gion Kobu, a place that "existed in a world apart, a special realm whose mission and identity depended on preserving the time-honored traditions of the past." She illustrates how it coexisted within post-World War II Japan at a time when the country was undergoing its radical transformation from a post-feudal society to a modern one.

I Beat the Odds From Homelessness, to The Blind Side, and Beyond by Michael Oher
I Beat the Odds: From Homelessness, to The Blind Side, and Beyond by Michael Oher
Michael Oher is the young man at the center of the true story depicted in The Blind Side movie (and book) that swept up awards and accolades. Though the odds were heavily stacked against him, Michael had a burning desire deep within his soul to break out of the Memphis inner-city ghetto and into a world of opportunity. While many people are now familiar with Oher's amazing journey, this is the first time he shares his account of his story in his own words, revealing his thoughts and feelings with details that only he knows, and offering his point of view on how anyone can achieve a better life. Looking back on how he went from being a homeless child in Memphis to playing in the NFL, Michael talks about the goals he had for himself in order to break out of the cycle of poverty, addiction, and hopelessness that trapped his family for so long. He recounts poignant stories growing up in the projects and running from child services and foster care over and over again in search of some familiarity. Eventually he grasped onto football as his ticket out of the madness and worked hard to make his dream into a reality. But Oher also knew he would not be successful alone. With his adoptive family, the Touhys, and other influential people in mind, he describes the absolute necessity of seeking out positive role models and good friends who share the same values to achieve one's dreams.

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline
Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline
Nearly eighteen, Molly Ayer knows she has one last chance. Just months from "aging out" of the child welfare system, and close to being kicked out of her foster home, a community service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping her out of juvie and worse. Vivian Daly has lived a quiet life on the coast of Maine. But in her attic, hidden in trunks, are vestiges of a turbulent past. As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly discovers that she and Vivian aren't as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance. The closer Molly grows to Vivian, the more she discovers parallels to her own life. A Penobscot Indian, she, too, is an outsider being raised by strangers, and she, too, has unanswered questions about the past. As her emotional barriers begin to crumble, Molly discovers that she has the power to help Vivian find answers to mysteries that have haunted her for her entire life - answers that will ultimately free them both.


message 8: by Margitte (new)

Margitte What a great selection of books, Mariah! All the nominations are so worth reading. It's a difficult choice.


message 9: by Mariah Roze (new)

Mariah Roze (mariahroze) | 1370 comments Mod
Margitte wrote: "What a great selection of books, Mariah! All the nominations are so worth reading. It's a difficult choice."

Thank you :) People nominate books and then everyone votes :) It is really cool!


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