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Ancillary Justice (Imperial Radch, #1)
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Series Read: Imperial Radch > Imperial Radch Book 1: Ancillary Justice

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message 1: by mark, personal space invader (last edited Oct 02, 2016 11:01PM) (new)

mark monday (happy-end-of-the-world) | 1274 comments Mod
Our new Series Read is Ann Leckie's Imperial Radch.

Ancillary Justice is the first book in the series. It was published in 2014 and swept all of that year's awards, winning the Best Novel Award for the Hugo, the Nebula, the Arthur C. Clarke, and the British Science Fiction Association.

I'm really excited to start reading this one!


Mickey | 595 comments I'm in!

I started yesterday and already I am hooked. It looks like a good one.


message 3: by Laz (new) - rated it 5 stars

Laz the Sailor (laz7) One suggestion: there is a significant quirk to this story which has caused some readers to DNF. Please try to work through it, as once you get used to it, you'll find it fascinating.


message 4: by Maggie, space cruisin' for a bruisin' (new) - rated it 4 stars

Maggie K | 1282 comments Mod
I read this last year and simply LOVED it......Might have to do a re-read!


Shelly | 9 comments I read the trilogy this past spring and loved all three books. I'd love for Leckie to write more in that universe.


Stuart Ridgway | 15 comments I've been trying to finish this for quite some time now. Struggling.


Alexa (AlexaNC) | 302 comments I adore this! Seriously looking forward to rereading it!


message 8: by Brian (new) - added it

Brian Kirksey (gojiras) | 2 comments Looks promising.


Ragnhild (ragstheweaver) | 2 comments Laz wrote: "One suggestion: there is a significant quirk to this story which has caused some readers to DNF. Please try to work through it, as once you get used to it, you'll find it fascinating."

The POV is definitely a bit challenging to begin with, Don't know if this is what you're referring to, but I came to love it throughout the book!


message 10: by Laz (new) - rated it 5 stars

Laz the Sailor (laz7) Ragnhild wrote: "The POV is definitely a bit challenging to begin with, Don't know if this is what you're referring to, but I came to love it throughout the book! "

Gives "head hopping" all new meaning!

There is one other thing that some folk didn't like, but I'll wait until the open discussion starts.


LindaJ^ (lindajs) | 260 comments Haven't written my review or read any reviews yet. I liked it a lot.


message 12: by Mickey (last edited Oct 29, 2016 12:23PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mickey | 595 comments This book kept reminding me of the science fiction show Andromeda (TV series) with that Herculean character Kevin Sorbo. Where the ship had a couple of avatars in which they could talk to each other. It also reminded me of David Brin's - Glory Season a world of mostly ruled by women.

I enjoyed reading Ancillary Justice. The character and world builds was well done and the writing was very good.

However there was an area that made me wonder if I had the structure of the society correct. Everywhere in the book referred Seivarden as a female, but Doctor Strigan kept referring to Seivarden as "him" a male and the Ancillary kept referring to Seivarden as "her". This section of the book made my brain hurt. I would think a medical doctor would know the difference.

This book is just so British. An empire ruled by a family monarch that has internal conflicts and of course tea and crumpets.

Not sure if anything is new or different from other science fiction novels. Still this book has a very good story that flows from page to page.

Since it is at the end of the month, I kept wondering if I needed to hide much of this review.

Now back to my oolong chai tea and chewy almond cookies.


Shelly | 9 comments Everyone in the Radch Empire is referred to with what we think of as the female sex pronouns: her, she. Outside the Radch Empire, sex specific pronouns are used. Once I got used to this, which took about 40 or 50 pages, I'll admit, I didn't really notice the pronouns and realized a character's sex didn't matter, which was, I believe, the author's intent. However, from descriptions of Seivarden, I believe she (or he, if you prefer) was physically male.


Mickey | 595 comments So, I am seeing all the characters as female, when they are not. My brain is hurting again.


Robert | 45 comments I also took around 40-50 pages to get used to it and understand the presentation. I then found it served for me what I agree was the intent - a characters gender didn't matter.

I thought this was one of the best (scifi) books I have read in a few years - greatly enjoyed it and recommend it generally. It was a great story, presented in an interesting and unexpected and new environment. The gender aspect was one interesting twist - which for me added to but did not dominate my appreciation.

I was intrigued when in Powells bookstore (portland) and the book was in a 'feminist literature' display; till then it didn't strike me that this could be considered a "feminist" twist. I can see the point, though am still not sure I would characterize it that way...


message 16: by Laz (new) - rated it 5 stars

Laz the Sailor (laz7) Laz wrote: "There is one other thing that some folk didn't like, but I'll wait until the open discussion starts."

The gender reference is the item I was referring to last month. Since the default gender in English is male, I first thought that the author simply reversed that, but then it became more complicated.


message 17: by Mickey (last edited Nov 03, 2016 12:11PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mickey | 595 comments Yea, it gets much more complicated in the next book.

Yea, those Athoek holidays in chapter 6 in the next book is Definitely anti male, which seems to reinforce an all female society.

Also Anaander Mianaai rulers are mostly clones. So I was fairly certain that the society was made up of females. And just wondering if that one section with the off world doctor was typos using "him" instead of "her".

I have read other books that has primarily run by females and enjoyed those books as well.

Still, the methodology of reproduction is a bit hazy here.

This is science fiction and authors are free to create new non gender pronoun sounding new words. Also the use of "citizen" was a good one.


message 18: by Laz (new) - rated it 5 stars

Laz the Sailor (laz7) You remembered how to spell all those alien names!


Mickey | 595 comments Laz wrote: "You remembered how to spell all those alien names!"

No, my kindle has a people tab that displays all the characters names and book links.


Shelly | 9 comments In physical descriptions, Seivarden definitely comes across, to me, at least, as being male. I was undecided as to what Anaander Mianaai was physically. But for the most part, after those first 40 or 50 pages, and especially in the second and third books, I didn't see any given character as male or female, just people. I really loved the series and appreciated how it expanded how I viewed characters.


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