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The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Hercule Poirot, #4)
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The Murder of Roger Ackroyd > Week 3, SPOILERS!, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

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message 1: by Alexa (new)

Alexa (AlexaNC) | 435 comments And now we can discuss Agatha Christie's The Murder of Roger Ackroyd in its entirety! Watch out - SPOILERS!


Charlene Morris | 1129 comments Mod
I finished the book. I think I was expecting it to be like Murder on the Orient Express. I didn't get who was the murder.


Charlene Morris | 1129 comments Mod
At the end I definitely felt horrible for Caroline who would be the one to find the last dead person. One wonders if Caroline would be able to piece the "dots" together.


message 4: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
Certainly! Whether she will admit it, is a different story.


Charlene Morris | 1129 comments Mod
Do you think that the death of the murderer was "justice" for the murder of Roger Ackroyd?

I don't think so, especially the way the book made it sound like it would be all glossed over and hushed up. Those that needed to know would but it wouldn't be public knowledge. It makes it easier for the murderer's family left behind though.


message 6: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
So, what did everyone think of the solution? There are many critics of this book, but it was voted the best crime novel ever. Do you agree? http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-ent...


message 7: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
This article includes some reviews: http://agathachristie.wikia.com/wiki/...


message 8: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
A review of some of Christie's book by an Indian: http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/lr/2...


message 9: by Kimberley (last edited Oct 28, 2016 06:49PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kimberley Challman | 19 comments After finishing the book last night, I closed it and said, 'wow.' The end caught me off guard. I was almost left with a feeling of disappointment about who the who turned out to be. And I felt sad for Caroline. But, then, I had to think about the fact that there was no one else I wanted it to be. It was a good read for me, and it feels good to have read my first Agatha Christie novel.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 352 comments Thanks for those links Emily.

This is probably my 4th reading. So I remembered whodunnit but had forgotten some details like the dictaphone.

I agree it is one of Christie's best - but I would rank And Then There Were None Murder on the Orient Express Endless Night & another half remembered one above it. (I still hopefully look for it)

I loved Caroline - one of Christie's best secondary characters.

Very fair portrayal of the servants.

My edition had one strongly anti-semitic passage - always stuns me when I come across them, but I still prefer to read uncensored.

I'll have my thoughts more organised after I have done my review. :)


message 11: by Suki (new) - rated it 5 stars

Suki St Charles (goodreadscomsuki_stcharles) | 60 comments Carol ♛ Type, Oh Queen! ♛ wrote:
"My edition had one strongly anti-semitic passage - always stuns me when I come across them, but I still prefer to read uncensored."
This was my first time reading this book, and that anti-Semetic comment just flew up out of nowhere! I had to go back and reread to confirm what I had seen. I do agree, though, about preferring to read uncensored.



message 12: by Suki (new) - rated it 5 stars

Suki St Charles (goodreadscomsuki_stcharles) | 60 comments I really enjoyed the book, but the dedication kind of ruined it for me- it telegraphed that suspicion would fall on everyone in turn, and it is usually the narrator who is above suspicion, it seemed obvious that he was the guy. I had quite liked his character, and kept hoping that I was wrong. I enjoyed all the twists and turns in the plot, and, if I hadn't read the dedication, the identity of the murderer would have come as a surprise. My favorite scene was the mah-jongg game- the recounting of the play was very funny.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 352 comments Suki wrote: "I really enjoyed the book, but the dedication kind of ruined it for me- it telegraphed that suspicion would fall on everyone in turn, and it is usually the narrator who is above suspicion, it seeme..."

I rarely read dedications & I don't think my edition had one. It's an old ebook one I converted for kindle.

What Christie did that was clever was Dr Shepherd appeared to be a substitute for Hastings - would seem lazy work by the author & then with the solution you realise Shepherd is nothing like Hastings at all! Very clever writing!


message 14: by Alexa (new)

Alexa (AlexaNC) | 435 comments Thanks so much Charlene, for leading this discussion! We all really appreciate it!


Marilyn | 192 comments Charlene wrote: "Do you think that the death of the murderer was "justice" for the murder of Roger Ackroyd?

I don't think so, especially the way the book made it sound like it would be all glossed over and hushed ..."


I finished this book a few weeks ago and admit that I am too trusting of narrators.

Justice? In 1926 would suicide be considered a gentleman's version of justice? It was an ok ending for the story but it didn't feel like justice. By hushing it up, Caroline, the biggest gossip in town, was now the target of the gossip in town.


message 16: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - added it

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
In 1926, a gentleman was allowed to commit suicide. Of course, a member of the lower classes would have been publicly hung.

I just taught this book two weeks ago and one gentleman said that he believed the public would be told the 'case was unsolved,' which would have saved Caroline from the gossips. I am not sure I agree with him, because then there would be suspicion hanging over everyone else.

These Golden Age mysteries were considered puzzles or 'whodunits,' and were treated as games. I don't think the reader is supposed to think of the consequences of the crime on the families involved.


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