World, Writing, Wealth discussion

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The Lounge: Chat. Relax. Unwind. > Peril or adventure?

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Near 13-th parsec sign on an interstellar highway to Betelgeuse, you spot someone flagging you down for a lift. You can't be sure, but at least it's not a highway police wanting to give you a ticket for speeding at 200K miles per second..
Would you stop and take a chance?


message 2: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments I would. In case someone is in trouble.


message 3: by Tara Woods Turner (last edited Oct 02, 2016 07:07AM) (new)

Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments I would not. I would slow down and get relevant information, tell the driver I will send help and then call the highway patrol. I'm not stopping and I'm not getting out of the car. I will call for help as I'm driving and if possible loop back around and see how things are looking. I have handled similar situations before in this manner.


message 4: by Angel (new)

Angel No.


message 5: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments If you are travelling between the stars, and you personally want to be alive when you get there, you need to travel at relativistic speeds. You could not stop, even if you wanted to. It is also extremely difficult to see how they stopped, whatever "stopped" means without a defined frame of reference :-)


Tara Woods Turner | 2063 comments Many perils started out innocently as adventures.


message 7: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Ian wrote: "You could not stop, even if you wanted to. It is also extremely difficult to see how they stopped, whatever "stopped" means without a defined frame of reference :-)..."

Yeah, the mechanics are important as well as a probability to meet hitchhikers in the outer space, but I just wanted to describe a situ for decision -:)


message 8: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Ian wrote: "If you are travelling between the stars, and you personally want to be alive when you get there, you need to travel at relativistic speeds. You could not stop, even if you wanted to. It is also ext..."

Ian do you believe we are governed by forces outside of our orbit or control?


message 9: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments @ Nik - couldn't resist :-)

@ Mehreen - it depends on what you mean by control. I don't believe there are any supernatural forces, but I suppose there may be forces we know nothing about yet. Then again, I can't control gravity, but it is there, and the citizens of Aleppo probably can't control anything. As far as space travel, etc, goes, I think we have a rough idea of everything in space, and planets will obey the laws of physics as we know them. There will be a lot of technology available that was yet have no idea about.


message 10: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 03, 2016 09:18PM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Ian wrote: "@ Nik - couldn't resist :-)

@ Mehreen - it depends on what you mean by control. I don't believe there are any supernatural forces, but I suppose there may be forces we know nothing about yet. Then..."


Thank you Ian. I was alluding to the recent data received from satellites that have shed light on origin of life, the cosmos, the cycle of birth and rebirth and all of that I'm sure you are aware of without going into too much details. The metaphysical realities as it were. From what I have gathered and I'll share them with you. Without oxygen, carbon-dioxide or the essential gasses no life on earth can can survive. In a way then, if we largely depend on them for survival, by default they must have full control over us and perhaps our thoughts. How they control the human intelligence which varies from person to person is another thing. But more generally, this is what I ask.


message 11: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments @ Mehreen. Ha, for what it is worth, I have an ebook out there that summarises the evidence up until 2011 as to how planets formed and how life might have got started, and I have added my own ideas. It is a bit heavy going because I analyse over 600 scientific papers. I am thinking vaguely about writing a more digestible summary book one day.

As for the elements, apart from hydrogen and helium, whatever is on earth stays here (gravity). As to what controls human thought/consciousness, that is a complete unknown at present. I am reasonably convinced something does, but what it is is somewhat open ended.


message 12: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 03, 2016 09:20PM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Ian wrote: "@ Mehreen. Ha, for what it is worth, I have an ebook out there that summarises the evidence up until 2011 as to how planets formed and how life might have got started, and I have added my own ideas..."

Thank you so much Ian. I am not a scientist but full of scientific curiosity, specially about our universe, galaxy, how did life come about so on and so forth. I am sure you have written an excellent ebook. I liked what you said about gravity and how everything else apart from hydrogen and helium stays - brilliant!

Also when people die say at the ripe old age of 100 or 120, what elements of this body do the mother earth use to generate new life? Unless of course the body is eaten away by insects which is a different recycling process altogether.


message 13: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments We have a program in our body for the production of the entire organism from scratch, we contain production facilities. Why is it programmed to re-generate some of the cells and not the others, like neurons, for example?


message 14: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 04, 2016 12:22AM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Nik wrote: "We have a program in our body for the production of the entire organism from scratch, we contain production facilities. Why is it programmed to re-generate some of the cells and not the others, lik..."

Do you mean after we die this program re-generates new life?


message 15: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Nik, it is called evolution. Dinosaurs did not worry about toothache - they simply replaced their teeth over and over again. We can't do that because it was an asset that for our ancestors it did not give competitive advantage, so evolution lost that and concentrated on something more advantageous at the time.


message 16: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Mehreen wrote: "Do you mean after we die this program re-generates new life? ..."

I might be not precise scientifically here, but the embryo, basing on a program contained in the combination of genes/chromosomes/dna is able to develop from a few cells to a complete human organism, taking from the outside 'raw-materials' in the form of food/liquid/air and produce 'in-house' all the body parts. Some cells regenerate: you have a cut, after a while new skin grows, but neurons 'burn' and don't regenerate for all I know. The program is there, the facilties too (for they once created the neurons), but the shop is closed? -:)


message 17: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Ian wrote: "Nik, it is called evolution. ..."

Maybe. I wonder why we and our cells with us age, instead of reproducing fresh cells for every organ, every 5-10 years under a five-year plan -:)


message 18: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Nik wrote: "Ian wrote: "Nik, it is called evolution. ..."

Maybe. I wonder why we and our cells with us age, instead of reproducing fresh cells for every organ, every 5-10 years under a five-year plan -:)"


Good Question. We are born with a lot of intelligence to ask
intelligent questions, to which the answers are not found readily. All will be revealed bit by bit in good time.


message 19: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Actually, from what I understand, it has recently been found that neurons and nerve cells can regenerate. The mechanism is the difficult bit. I gather you can regenerate just about everything from stem cells but we tend to run out off stem cells as we age. There's a lot I don't know/understand about this, though.


message 20: by Mehreen (last edited Oct 04, 2016 04:30PM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Ian wrote: "Actually, from what I understand, it has recently been found that neurons and nerve cells can regenerate. The mechanism is the difficult bit. I gather you can regenerate just about everything from ..."

Can we then deduct from this that one day, we could become immortal?


message 21: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments My guess, Mehreen, is no, and I am not sure why anyone would want to be. Just think of what the population crisis would end up like.


message 22: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Ian wrote: "My guess, Mehreen, is no, and I am not sure why anyone would want to be. Just think of what the population crisis would end up like."

I didn't say I want to be. I just want to understand the nature of things. God knows research is underway for that too.


message 23: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Kuhn (kevinkuhn) | 45 comments I've read that lobsters are basically immortal. They typically die of other causes verses old age. They are also excellent with melted butter . . .


message 24: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments And what would you do?


message 25: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Nik wrote: "And what would you do?"

With the context, I am not sure I follow. Become a lobster? Eventually die? Probably the latter, in my case.


message 26: by Nik (last edited Sep 20, 2018 02:05AM) (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Ian wrote: "With the context, I am not sure I follow. Become a lobster? Eventually die? Probably the latter, in my case."

Becoming a lobster may be a better alternative.


message 27: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments What about you - would you pick up a hitchhiker?


message 28: by Lizzie (new)

Lizzie | 1629 comments No. I am single and unable to defend myself. I refuse to carry a gun. I won't even pull over because in most cases I am in my convertible with the top down and therefore it would be just as risky for me to even stop to get info to pass on.


message 29: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments When I was a wee lass in college, I picked up hitchhikers and was one myself at times. That was in the '70s. In the '18s, no one hitchhikes any more - they just walk hopelessly by the roadside, knowing no one will stop if they put up a thumb. I say a politically incorrect prayer for them.


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