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The Fifth Season (The Broken Earth, #1)
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Previous BotM--DISCUSSIONS > The Fifth Season: Finished Reading **SPOILERS**

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message 1: by Candiss (new) - added it

Candiss (tantara) | 1207 comments Here's a general topic for people who have finished reading The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin.

Caution: Spoilers are likely in this thread!


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 235 comments I adored this unusual novel, especially for the unique world-building!


message 3: by Viv (new) - rated it 5 stars

Viv JM I agree that the world building in this was great!

I thought that Jemisin's characters (as in her other books) are so diverse and interesting. I loved the three-way relationship, and the fact that there was such a matter-of-factly mentioned trans character that was no big deal! Great stuff.

I also loved the way the three characters were slowly revealed to be one and the same.

I am a bit confused by the ending though. What is the deal with the moon?!


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 235 comments This book is only part one, maybe a trilogy, as of now unfinished.

: (


Christine | 620 comments Viv wrote: "I agree that the world building in this was great!

I thought that Jemisin's characters (as in her other books) are so diverse and interesting. I loved the three-way relationship, and the fact that..."


Moon???
A trilogy just started?
I usually like to wait until all three books are completed before reading (damn you George RR Martin!!)


message 6: by Justine (last edited Aug 04, 2016 08:31PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Justine (justinescholefield) | 563 comments I also really enjoyed this and I figured out that these were all narratives of a single life pretty early. What made me think it was the same person is that the narrative of at least two were obviously not on concurrent timelines, and I wondered about the choice to have three distinct life stages of characters like that? Which made me think maybe it was in fact all the same person. Because of that, I read the story quite differently than I otherwise might have.

I was seeing from the start a story of convergence of circumstances that would take the child who is ostensibly rescued/enslaved to become the adult who is accepts/rejects her enslavement to the mother who disavows/reclaims her place as a person with power. I was actively looking for the things in the child and the young woman that would lead to Essun becoming who she is.

I didn't see in advance the revelation that Hoa was the narrator of Essun's journey. I suppose that this book represents us seeing Essun's lifelong preparation for whatever role she is to take in the next book? That is essentially what I saw, but I could be wrong about that.


aPriL does feral sometimes  (cheshirescratch) | 235 comments People like Essun had such powerful abilities so I can easily agree they needed to be trained, yet they were also enslaved through cultural disapproval and a deliberately manipulated shallow education, even more than by physical threats. The rock eaters actually were my favorites, though.


message 8: by Chris, Moderator (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chris (heroncfr) | 585 comments Mod
I really enjoyed this one. I agree with many others, a unique world and a unique storytelling approach. I'm psyched, the next book was released just moments ago! It's next on my list...


Maggie K | 298 comments I enjoyed it too. some of the issues were very intriguing to me.


message 10: by Phil (new) - rated it 4 stars

Phil J | 57 comments I liked it. Here's my review:
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

Viv wrote: "I am a bit confused by the ending though. What is the deal with the moon?!"

Here's the ending, paraphrased:
*She kills her kid to keep him free.
*She flees inland and starts over as "Nessun" aka "you."
*Alabaster is abducted by the stone eater Antimony. He reappears and shatters the capital city, as was depicted in the prologue.
*Alabaster reappears in the underground city, where we find out that he is being gradually turned to stone and eaten by Antimony.
*He asks Syen/Nessun if she's ready yet. There are hints that the seasons were started a long time ago when orogenes smashed the moon into the Earth, or maybe just smashed it into dust. So I'm guessing Syen's destiny is to rectify the problem, possibly by creating a new moon.


message 11: by Phil (new) - rated it 4 stars

Phil J | 57 comments Justine wrote: "I didn't see in advance the revelation that Hoa was the narrator of Essun's journey."

That was the one surprise that I totally didn't see coming, and I kind of don't like it. The first person narration is really chummy, which doesn't mesh well with the way Hoa and the stone eaters are depicted in the book.


message 12: by Justine (last edited Sep 11, 2016 05:04PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Justine (justinescholefield) | 563 comments Phil wrote: "The first person narration is really chummy, which doesn't mesh well with the way Hoa and the stone eaters are depicted in the book."

I disagree on that, Phil. I think Hoa obviously has a special connection to her, which made the more intimate form of address seem appropriate. I think too that at the point at which this book is set, we still don't have a clear picture of when the narrative is taking place. For example, it could be that it is taking place some time in the future when Essun and Hoa's relationship has changed. There has to be reason he is telling her a story in which she features as a one of the participants...so, either she has forgotten and he is reminding her, or maybe he is comforting her by retelling the story of their shared past? It's just a guess though.


message 13: by Phil (new) - rated it 4 stars

Phil J | 57 comments Justine wrote: "Phil wrote: "The first person narration is really chummy, which doesn't mesh well with the way Hoa and the stone eaters are depicted in the book."

I disagree on that, Phil. I think Hoa obviously h..."


That's fair, Justine. Still, as a style point, it was so colloquial that it was jarring. It felt like a character from 20th/21st century America dropped into a story set on an alternate Earth.


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The Fifth Season (other topics)

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N.K. Jemisin (other topics)