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Genre Challenge 2015-17 > Award-Winning Books - August 2016

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message 1: by Liz, Moderator (last edited Jul 28, 2016 03:50AM) (new)

Liz | 3510 comments Mod
It's award-winning books for August. They can be Booker winners, Pultizer, Costa, National Book Award, Hugo, Nobel Prize, Orange Prize, etc. etc. from any year. So let's see if they live up to their accolades!

I'm thinking of trying The Orphan Master's Son (which would give me North Korea for around the world), or maybe Olive Kitteridge (and I'd get another US State)...

The Orphan Master's Son by Adam Johnson Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout


message 2: by Mercia (new)

Mercia McMahon (merciamcmahon) | 610 comments Oh that could be my excuse to read either Costa winner Elizabeth Is Missing and The Lady Astronaut of Mars, which won the Hugo (for novelette) in London when I was in the audience.

Elizabeth Is Missing by Emma Healey The Lady Astronaut of Mars by Mary Robinette Kowal


message 3: by Tania (new)

Tania | 1008 comments Think I am going to go for Now in November by Josephine Winslow Johnson , won the Pulitzer in 1935


message 4: by Bill (last edited Jul 27, 2016 04:14PM) (new)

Bill | 2764 comments I've a few possibles with my initial cursory look at my library;
- Whitbread Award winner - Behind the Scenes at the Museum by Kate Atkinson;
- Hugo Award winner - The Demolished Man by Alfred Bester
- Nebula Award - Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card
- Edgar Award - The Black Echo by Michael Connelly
- Commonwealth Writer's Prize - Good to a Fault by Marina Endicott

I'll keep looking.. :)


message 5: by Andrew (new)

Andrew | 1010 comments Oh dear, I have just finished The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen which won the Pulitzer this year but I would highly recommend it, back to my tbr list now.


message 6: by Tania (new)

Tania | 1008 comments Does it has to be those awards? I was looking at The Book Thief which seems to have won every thing but them.


message 7: by Liz, Moderator (new)

Liz | 3510 comments Mod
Tania wrote: "Does it has to be those awards? I was looking at The Book Thief which seems to have won every thing but them."

Don't worry Tania, it's not just those awards, I was just giving a few suggestions. :)


message 8: by Liz, Moderator (new)

Liz | 3510 comments Mod
Bill wrote: "I've a few possibles with my initial cursory look at my library;
- Whitbread Award winner - Behind the Scenes at the Museum by Kate Atkinson;
- Hugo Award winner - [bo..."


Great selection. I've been meaning to read [book:Behind the Scenes at the Museum|28940] for years! Let me know how you get on.


message 9: by Kate, Moderator (new)

Kate | 1381 comments Mod
Aha, this is going to give me the opportunity to finish The Seducer which won the Nordic Prize for Literature in 2001. Awful book that I'm half way through (on page 303) and I abandoned it back at the start of the year. I'm determined to finish it to get Norway for around the world challenge and this is the incentive I need!


message 10: by Ian, Moderator (last edited Jul 29, 2016 03:31AM) (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
Shame to read a crap book. Better reading The Snowman (Harry Hole, #7) by Jo Nesbø by Jo Nesbø which won the Bokhandlerprisen in 2007......roughly translates from Norwegian as "bookshops price" but is an award in Norway and a great crime novel which brought Harry Hole to international fame.

Me I'm going to read The Vegetarian by Han Kang by Han Kang which won the Booker International this year.

May also try Lost City Radio by Daniel Alarcón by Daniel Alarcón and All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews by Miriam Toews both of which won some less well known awards.

Of recent big award Booker, Orange/Baileys, Costa winners, The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan and The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller are probably my favourites.


message 11: by Danielle (new)

Danielle (daniellecobbaertbe) | 374 comments I had a look at my library books. Luckily one has won an award, namely: Sleeping on Jupiter. Looking at my booklist, I could read The Impressionist


message 12: by Bill (new)

Bill | 2764 comments I'm starting this challenge with Edgar award winner, The Black Echo (Harry Bosch, #1) by Michael Connelly The Black Echo, the first Harry Bosch mystery by Michael Connelly, I've just started watching the TV series and have been enjoying quite a lot so this seems appropriate.


message 13: by Ian, Moderator (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
Finished The Vegetarian by Han Kang by Han Kang.

An unusual, very disturbing yet ultimately compelling read about the social pressure to conform which contrasts passionate obsession with cold emotional detachment leading ultimately to a visceral spiral into madness. 4 stars because it was really good though always too uncomfortable a read to be described as really enjoyable.


message 14: by Sue (new)

Sue | 1340 comments Reading The Long Dry which won a Betty Trask prize. Set on a farm in a dry spell in Camarthenshire it will also give me a welsh county and, judging by the first few pages, a good read too.


message 15: by Liz, Moderator (new)

Liz | 3510 comments Mod
Just finished Olive Kitteridge. Beautiful writing, well drawn characters, melancholy atmosphere peppered with dry humour. I thought it a well-deserving winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Onto the next one...

Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout


message 16: by Em (last edited Aug 07, 2016 01:12PM) (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments I'm going to cheat a bit and count Restoration by Rose Tremain Restoration by Rose Tremain that I'm reading for 17th Century Time Traveller Challenge as it won Sunday Express Book of Year in 1989 and shortlisted for Booker too! I like the look of Olive Kitteridge - another one for my never ending to be read list...


message 17: by Mercia (new)

Mercia McMahon (merciamcmahon) | 610 comments Elizabeth is Missing by Emma Healey
I love novels where mental health issues are dealt with well and Elizabeth is Missing is up there with some of the best. Very well written and a joy to read with moments of laugh out loud situational humour.

There'e even a badge on the cover mentioned that it was the 2014 Costa Book of the Year.


message 18: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Acker | 8 comments How does one learn more about these awards? Or is it by recommendation? Thanks in advance.


message 19: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Acker | 8 comments Mercia wrote: "Elizabeth is Missing by Emma Healey
I love novels where mental health issues are dealt with well and Elizabeth is Missing is up there with some of the best. Very well written ..."


Hello. May I suggest my book if you like this sort of topic? I can only hope you'll find it interesting.


message 20: by Teresa (new)

Teresa Hildebrandt (goodreadscomteresahild) | 9 comments The Four Books!


message 21: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 355 comments Ah, excellent. While on holiday I finally gave in and read Min kamp 1 (My Struggle 1) by Karl Ove Knausgård. That was nominated for a bunch of awards and won a couple (like the Norwegian Critics Award). I refused to read it at the time because of all the hype.

My verdict: I liked it better than I had expected, though it was terribly long winded at times. 3 stars, and would have read the second book too if the holiday hadn't come to an end. (I found the three first books on the shelves where we were staying.)

And I guess I could make another attempt at getting around to The Book Thief, since I didn't have the time last month.

I also have Like Water for Chocolate coming up for Mexico. It won The Prêmio Jabuti prize in Brazil, and the American Book Sellers' Award.


message 22: by Kate, Moderator (last edited Aug 10, 2016 01:44AM) (new)

Kate | 1381 comments Mod
I've finally finished The Seducer which was an epic 606 pages and boring as anything! It had one or two good points but not nearly enough for such an investment of time. It won the Nordic prize for literature and is the first in a trilogy. Having given it only one star I won't be reading the other 2 books!
However, as I recorded the number of pages I had read at intervals I discovered the graph which shows your progress with a book so I guess it wasn't all bad!


message 23: by Ian, Moderator (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
Read and enjoyed a YA book - yes me??? Award winning side was a complete accident as was reading it 'cos it was set in Puerto Rico for my ATW trip but found out afterwards it had won an award so here it is.

The Meaning of Consuelo by Judith Ortiz Cofer which was the winner of the Americas Award for Children's and Young Adult Literature in 2003.


message 24: by Ian, Moderator (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
Elizabeth wrote: "How does one learn more about these awards? Or is it by recommendation? Thanks in advance."

You'll find details of all the big general awards like the Booker, the Costa, the Baileys - all British based and the ones listed by Bill and others above plus individual newspaper awards or things like the New York Times top 100 books of the year, either by simple google/other search engine search or by searching either GR groups where someone will always post the long listed and short listed books each year and you'll also find historic nominations and winners. I tend to search in Wikipedia.

More genre based awards are a bit more difficult to find but if you like say crime - you'll probably get the annual Dagger Awards and similar by just searching in GR groups or via google with "best crime fiction 2016 or 15 or 14 etc.

The awards lists are always a good source of inspiration to find a few books that you may not come across otherwise. Hope that helps and good hunting.


message 25: by Ian, Moderator (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
“She had a face like a slapped arse and an arse like a bag of Doritos”
― Lisa McInerney, The Glorious Heresies

Winner of the Baileys Womens Prize for Fiction 2016 and as a result to be added to my to read list.


message 26: by Sue (new)

Sue | 1340 comments Ian wrote: "“She had a face like a slapped arse and an arse like a bag of Doritos”
― Lisa McInerney, The Glorious Heresies

Winner of the Baileys Womens Prize for Fiction 2016 and as a result to be added to m..."


Lol!


message 27: by Andrew (new)

Andrew | 1010 comments In the rain of Scotland starting The Shipping News by Annie Proulx winner of a shed load in 1993/4 including Pulitzer. If i can manage it before end of month i fancy 'Glorious heresies' , Ian's quote has won me over. i also want to try this year's theakston's crime award prize winner I Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh


message 28: by Ian, Moderator (last edited Aug 13, 2016 04:46AM) (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
Feel for you in Scotland mate. Was watching the sunny cricket in London on Thursday with driving rain here in the NW with strong winds and the radiators on. But the weather has been even worse pants all week oop there. Have added the theakston's, ta.


message 29: by Liz, Moderator (last edited Aug 14, 2016 06:43AM) (new)

Liz | 3510 comments Mod
I just finished The Orphan Master's Son I think I'd describe it as Kafkaesque. It reminded me a little of Catch 22 and a little of 1984. Often bleak and occasionally very funny - a strange, but gripping novel. I have no idea whether it reflects the true experience of living in North Korea, but I'm not willing to put it to the test....


message 30: by Sue (new)

Sue | 1340 comments Liz wrote: "I just finished 'The Orphan Master's Son'. I think I'd describe it as Kafkaesque. It reminded me a little of Catch 22 and a little of 1984. Often bleak and occasionally very funny - a strange, but ..."

I recently read 2 books 1 set in each of the Koreas and felt the same way! Looking forward to this one though!


message 31: by Andrew (new)

Andrew | 1010 comments Ian wrote: "Feel for you in Scotland mate. Was watching the sunny cricket in London on Thursday with driving rain here in the NW with strong winds and the radiators on. But the weather has been even worse pant..."
I didn't even find a deep fried mars bar to lift the clouds, although read the rebooted rebus 'standing in another man's grave' which as i was in the home of tartan noir was atmospheric although not quite as good as previous books. The Pakistani's seem to be proving quite tough at mo Ian hope you are enjoying!


message 32: by Sue (new)

Sue | 1340 comments Am startng One Hundred Years of Solitudewhich has won various prizes (but none I'd heard of). The whole South American magic realism genre is not one I understand or particularly like so have enrolled on one of Futurelearn's free online courses about Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez. Have to read 5, yes 5, of his books so that should slow up my travels a bit!


message 33: by Liz, Moderator (last edited Aug 14, 2016 06:42AM) (new)

Liz | 3510 comments Mod
Sue wrote: "Am startng One Hundred Years of Solitudewhich has won various prizes (but none I'd heard of). The whole South American magic realism genre is not one I understand or particularly like ... Have to read 5, yes 5, of his books so that should slow up my travels a bit! ..."

Lol! You must be a glutton for punishment, Sue.

I read 'One Hundred Years...' a while back. I remember it was very beautiful in places, but I kept getting confused with all the different characters, there are so many!

I've meant to read more by him, but I keep putting it off. Perhaps I should try Love in the Time of Cholera or Chronicle of a Death Foretold. If it will get me Columbia for Around the World, it will be worth it!

Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez


message 34: by Sue (new)

Sue | 1340 comments Sadly I have already been to Columbia. Just wanted to see what all the fuss is about really. On the second chapter and constantly referring to the family tree.


message 35: by Laura (new)

Laura I think I'll be reading quite a few books for this challenge but mainly because most of the books I've wanted to read recently happen to also be award winners. So far I've read Gateway and Life During Wartime which were both pretty entertaining sci-fis.

I'm currently reading Out Stealing Horses which feels a little stilted, partially because it is populated with characters who have the whole 'real men don't show emotions' problem which makes them slightly difficult to relate to.


message 36: by Sue (new)

Sue | 1340 comments Moonstone: The Boy Who Never Was set in 1918 Iceland. Author is a poet as well. Won the Icelandic Literary prize amongst others.


T. K. Elliott (Tiffany) (t_k_elliott) I've gone for Wolf Hall, which, in one fell swoop, will do:
1. This "prizewinners" challenge.
2. Sixteenth century for the timetraveller challenge (sorry, The Hangman's Daughter, I'll get to you eventually)
3. The Shelf Love challenge from elsewhere, since I've had it hanging around for a while.

Multitasking! :-)


message 38: by Liz, Moderator (last edited Aug 18, 2016 05:30AM) (new)

Liz | 3510 comments Mod
T. K. Elliott wrote: "I've gone for Wolf Hall, which, in one fell swoop, will do:
1. This "prizewinners" challenge.
2. Sixteenth century for the timetraveller challenge ..."



Oh yes! It's great when one book covers multiple challenges :)
(Enjoy Wolf Hall. I loved it, although it seems to divide readers...)


T. K. Elliott (Tiffany) (t_k_elliott) I'm enjoying it so far, although I don't like the present-tense narration. It's allegedly supposed to make the action feel more immediate, but it has the opposite effect on me.


message 40: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 355 comments Wolf Hall has present tense narration? Bleh. I was debating whether or not to put that on my TBR-list, but that decides it in the negative for me.


message 41: by Ian, Moderator (last edited Aug 19, 2016 06:58AM) (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
Andrew's driving Scottish rain now arrived in the NW. Not in time to save the test match for England down in that there London.

Have read the excellent American Rust by Philipp Meyer which won an LA Times Award for First Fiction in 2009 and have just started Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison , a US National Book Award finalist in 1992 and won the Ferro-Grumley Award for Lesbian fiction for 1993. So bit of a side tour to the US.

American Rust was fab, sad and in some ways gives an insight into the popularity today of Trump among white working class Americans as it is set amid the hopelessness of the now desolate ex-steel towns of Pennsylvania where 150,000 jobs were lost in the 90's.


message 42: by Danielle (new)

Danielle (daniellecobbaertbe) | 374 comments I read River Thieves and The Peculiar Life of a Lonely Postman. I suppose one of my next reads will be: The Vegetarian


T. K. Elliott (Tiffany) (t_k_elliott) Well, finished Wolf Hall. I enjoyed it, which came as a bit of a surprise, as my previous experience of Booker Prize winners has been that "won the Booker Prize" can be handily translated as "avoid".

The real surprise was that Mantel obviously has a quiet sense of humour; it made reading the book rather more relaxing than I would have thought (despite the present-tense narration, which I still dislike).

Reviewed here.


message 44: by [deleted user] (new)

I just spent the last two weeks plodding through 275 pages of Beloved which won the Pulitzer. It was all a bit confusing for me, didn't enjoy it.

Also read Elizabeth Is Missing (Costa winner), which was also a little bit confusing but much more readable. (275 pages in 2 days - that's more like it!)


message 45: by Mercia (new)

Mercia McMahon (merciamcmahon) | 610 comments The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth’s Past, #1) by Liu Cixin
I know it's turned September, but 3 of the 4 days I spent reading Cixin Liu's The Three-Body Problem were in August. This odd book won the 2015 Hugo Award for Best Novel. It is part political critique of the Chinese cultural revolution part philosophy and part Twilight Zone. I don't think it was intended to be tongue in cheek, but I could imagine Terry Pratchett writing something like this.


message 46: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 355 comments Slightly delayed, but I did read most of the book in August. Like Water for Chocolate definitely deserves its awards, and it should have a few more.

Once again I didn't get around to reading The Book Thief. :P


message 47: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 355 comments Actually, I've realised that I have also read some award winning children's books. Chris Riddell's Ottoline series. Great fun for children and their parents both.


message 48: by Tania (new)

Tania | 1008 comments Am putting The Dead Lake down for this. It one the independent foreign fiction prize. A strange compelling book that held me.


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